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authorcecelia · 2 hours ago
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Shelby Harris, eighteen-year-old character, begins, and sometimes ends, her chapters with free verse poems. I love her journey. I hope you will too. . #nationalpoetrymonth #yafiction #amwriting #writersofinstagram #authorsofinstagram #readersofinstagram #quotes #bookishquotes #comingsoon #ireadyalit https://www.instagram.com/p/CNlmAohLaoW/?igshid=1eiwaohs23gft
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perpetual-stories · 8 hours ago
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Pixar’s Rules to Storytelling:
hello, hello! Today’s post will be a bit different, similar to the post I made regarding the type of structures you can use to write your story, this will be going over Pixar’s [Structure] Storytelling Rules.
I love Pixar, they are phenomenal at what they do, I can make a few exceptions but that’s beside the point.
These rules were tweeted by a member of the Pixar Studios, her name is Emma Coats, oh man, to work at Pixar would be a dream!
Without further ado here are the the rules they follow for their fantastic movies!
22 Pixar Rules
You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.
You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different.
Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.
Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.
Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.
What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?
Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.
Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.
When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.
Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.
Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.
Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.
Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.
Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.
If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.
What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.
No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on – it’ll come back around to be useful later.
You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.
Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.
Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?
You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?
What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.
( this was copy and pasted from a website)
There you have it folks! Pixar’s Storytelling Rules! It’s a different writing tip but one nonetheless!
Please like, comment, or reblog my post! If you share it on Instagram tag me at perpetualstories
Follow my tumblr and Instagram for more writing and grammar tips and more!
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nerdlysane · 12 hours ago
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#nerdstuff #writersofinstagram #writingisarttoo #writingistherapy #writingsociety #bookstagrammers #bookrecommendations #bookstagram #instabook #bookphotography #bookporn #igbooks #ilovereading #bookhaul #bookhoarder #bookaddiction #bookstoread #whattoread #fortheloveofbooks #bookblogging #bookpics #weekendreads #bookrecs #booknerdproblems #nerdlysane https://www.instagram.com/p/CNkmhuAnZ2S/?igshid=go8ug6lu6dnz
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aileywrites · 12 hours ago
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So You Wanna Write A Chosen One?
Do you really? I mean I’m not gonna stop you, but sighhh.....I’m kidding, but only a little bit. I definitely feel like the trope is over done, but if you really want to write it, then we’re gonna write it well! Chosen ones are really hard to write imo because they always feel a tiny bit, I don’t what the right word to describe it is because the word I have in my head doesn’t really work to describe it, but basically the fact that only one person can defeat the big bag evil (normally, but not always, a white male) and everyone is unworthy, never really sat right with me. Even if its not a white guy, the fact that only one person out of the millions in the whole world is worthy to save the world, just sounds very supremacist to me. But, there can be some interesting nuances to writing a chosen ones, so here are a few tips for writing chosen one characters!
Their Choices Change Everything 
If your character is the Chosen One and the only one who can kill the big bad, then inevitably all the choices they make will have even more of an impact on the story. If Luke Skywalker decides to just chill on Tatootine instead of going to save Leia and thus beginning his predestined quest to return balance to the force, that changes the whole plot of the story. The story actually doesn’t happen because in that scenario Darth Vader offs Leila before anyone can come rescue her. In any story, the choices your character makes matter, but when your character is basically the Savior, the choices they make matter even more. Show them struggling with that. Maybe, they don’t want to do any of this. Maybe they would rather chill at home with their family, but in doing that, they would be dooming hundreds or even thousands of people to death. Showing them actually struggling with having the fates of pretty much the whole world in the palm of their hand adds some nuance to their character, especially if they’re already a reluctant hero. 
Make Them Work For It
A lot of people seem to think that just by being the chosen one a character becomes the all powerful, all knowing, omnipotent SuperHero who is basically undefeatable. I’m not gonna gripe with my problems about that whole trope today, but if you do have an all power, indestructible character you need to show them actually training and learning how to wield all this power, and preferably not over the course of one measly training chapter. They should loose and be beaten. Take Harry Potter for example. Harry’s a shitty wizard, and just because he’s the chosen one he never become a good wizard. At the beginning of the series, he’s a shitty wizard, and at the end of the series he’s a less shitty wizard, but he still isn’t that good. What talent and skill he does have though, he works for. He doesn’t just expect to win every battle because he’s the chosen one, he studies and he trains. Your chosen one character doesn’t have to be all powerful, in fact it sometimes makes for a better story when they aren’t. If they are though, remember to make them work for it!
Give Them A Weakness
This feels like an obvious thing, but there are so many books where the character will just have no weaknesses, and it makes any conflict in the book feel cheap and stilted. If we know that the character is going to win because they’ve been prophesied to kill the villain, then it’s a lot harder to get through the book because any of the conflict is just like eh. To stop that from happening, give them a legitimate, dangerous weakness. Something that if they’re not careful, will kill them. Something that the antagonist can use to exploit them and kill them. Kind of like how in ATLA, the Avatar State is super powerful and helpful and kickass, but if the Avatar dies in that state, then the whole Avatar reincarnation process stops. It’s a really big reward, but a huge risk to enter that state, and we as the viewers know and recognize that. Giving your character a big weakness adds conflict back into the story, especially if the antagonist knows about the weakness and the hero doesn’t, or vice versa. Knowing that the antagonist has a feasible and not absolutely contrived way to kill the chosen one raises the stakes for the story and keeps the reader interested!
Let Them Question Their Journey 
Honestly, I’m a very spiritual and religious person, but I still don’t know if I would just instantly believe if an angel came to me and said, “Ailey, you’re the Savior of the world.” I feel like even the most spiritual people would have moments of doubt and questioning. So many characters just instantly believe that they’re the chosen one and never question their destiny even after suffering a devastating lose. Especially after a devastating lose or the death of a teammate, I believe even the most confident and self-assured chosen one would start to doubt themselves and wonder if they were really meant to be the Savior of the world. Letting them have that doubt shows that they’re human even with this grand destiny. But, if your character never questions their destiny even after a really bad lose, that can be a very interesting character choice. Maybe they’ve always been extremely arrogant or have had an inflated sense of self way before their chosen one destiny was even revealed to them. Showing that internal dialogue of them believing wholeheartedly in themselves even if deep, deep down they know they’re wrong, especially if other characters have told them that they’re wrong can be so damn interesting to read. 
Make Them The Chosen One For a Reason
One of my biggest gripes with the Star Wars series is that they establish that Anakin is supposed to bring balance to the force, but then they don’t show him clearly doing that. Now, I am of the belief, that Anakin’s destiny was to father Luke and become Darth Vader thus, indirectly bringing balance to the force, but who knows. The point is, if you have a chosen one, they need to have a very clear role to play in the story. Why are they specifically the chosen one? How do their powers or destiny influence their choices and behavior? Having a chosen one in your story, a trope that people generally tend to hate, needs to be for a very specific reason. Going back to my ATLA references, by the end of the series, we understand exactly why Aang was chosen to be the Avatar. He’s finally grown to master all the elements and because of the way people treat him, and the way he treats them in return, we understand why anyone else wouldn’t have been able to be the Avatar in that situation. Aang was cautious, balanced, and had a very compassionate perspective. All of those things made him the perfect character to handle the challenges of being the Avatar.
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therealchangeandgrow · 14 hours ago
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I drove over to my daughter Sam’s place and found her outside watching the horses having fun in the pasture. “Dad, I guess you’re mad about me borrowing your time machine, but I just had to!” She explained when Ted Cruz became president in 2016 and nationalized all US businesses, gave half the US Treasury to the rich who funded his campaign, and then the world economy went into a global depression, well I had to do something! Confused I said, “That blowhard Ted Cruz was president?” “Yep, so I went back to 2015 and changed some things. I thought if the worst and most unlikely person won the primary election they’d lose the election, and maybe the financial meltdown wouldn’t happen, so I picked the biggest loser!” Sam looked so sad I couldn’t stay mad at her. Ordinarily she isn’t politically oriented. “Dad, he had failed marriages, ran his businesses into bankruptcy, ripped off working people by not paying bills, scammed others, sex cheating scandals, a real ass...Dad, how could people vote for such a failure?” I said, “Sam, no one could know he’d be so incompetent and screwup the pandemic response! Making business deals and getting product (vaccines and checks) out the door is easy for a real “business man,” but he couldn’t even get that right.” Sam looked down and started knocking her boot against the heal of her other boot. As a kid she did this when something bothered her. “Dad, there’s more. I did something in Paris. You’re not going to like it.” [Music: iMovie audio library, Springtime by Dave Babko. Video by Kate] #horsesofinstagram #springtime #timetravel #storytime #writersofinstagram #writer #changingtime #badpoliticians #changeandgrow https://www.instagram.com/p/CNkTvEIp28h/?igshid=106kfbk845ml0
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flufflygirlpriya · 15 hours ago
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#quotes #quotesdaily #quoteoftheday #quotestagram #quotesaboutlife #quotestoliveby #quote #quotesforlife #lifequotes #motivationalquotes #inspirationalquotes #sadquotes #lovequotes #lovediaries #writinggyaan #writersofinstagram #writingcommunity #writingaway #thoughts #thequoteswritergirl #mumbai #india (at Mumbai - मुंबई) https://www.instagram.com/p/CNkPUKTHg43/?igshid=unns3nyi6hym
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aami98 · 16 hours ago
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Don't we all have some of those deep dark secrets which we can't share,
not even to the person who is in our favorite call.
Not even to our three am therapist.
Those which we would rather take to our grave than put it out there.
We would rather leave the elephant in the room to trample around than speak about it.
Some of those skeletons that even though they are buried deep,
not just six feet, but even deep,
Come out calling our name .
Every time they are exhumed we push them back,
Further down into the depths of our memory.
Leaving them there waiting for them to rot and disintegrate.
Why not share them?
Trust, it's too precious, too priceless and these very skeletons taught us that lesson.
The lesson that even our three am therapist, even our favourite call,
All could dig them up  and may even be our new skeletons.
Teaching us at the end it's just us.
Aami.
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shaayarmoon · a day ago
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Likhaari 🖊️🤗🙏 Show some love { like + Save + Share } Follow - @shaayar.moon ------------------------- My All Writing Content is 100% Original and My Pen Name Is Shaayar.Moon © Penned by Chand Hussain {Real Name} --------------------- I am available on Some Social Media Like❤️ @nojotoapp @yqhindi @youtube @facebook @twitter @wattpad @pinterest #moonsfeeling #shayari #love #poetry #quotes #sad #writer #ishq #writersofinstagram #thoughts #lovequotes #shayar #instadaily #loveyourself #urdupoetry #instagram #likes #hindishayari #writing #photooftheday #shayarilover #follow #poetrycommunity #yourself #words #hindi #likeforlikes #urdu #life ♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️ ♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️♨️ ------------------------------- Google #shaayarmoon ------------------------------- 𝗗𝗼𝗻'𝘁 𝗙𝗼𝗿𝗴𝗲𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗦𝘂𝗯𝘀𝗰𝗿𝗶𝗯𝗲 𝗺𝘆 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗲𝗹 ❤️❤️𝗟𝗶𝗻𝗸 𝗜𝗻 𝗺𝘆 𝗕𝗶𝗼 ❤️❤️ ------------------------------- 𝗧𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗸 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗦𝗼 𝗺𝘂𝗰𝗵 ------------------------- (at Shaayar Moon) https://www.instagram.com/p/CNjUGhdFNU1/?igshid=ctp1hpj9953t
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zerimarclassics · a day ago
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I FREAKING LOVE IT! Don’t get me wrong ⬇️ I love getting feedback on the things I post up. I like talking about it. It’s just kind of a surprise when people I have known my entire life talk to me about what I posted or leave me comments asking legitimate questions. Or suggest new things for me to do. I’m just not used to people talking to me about my interests or etc and because of that I tend to Ungracefully flail and squeak out a “thank you”. So thank you. #tiktok #zerimarclassics #notyouraveragewriter #writersofinstagram #writercommunity #writercommunityofinstagram #family #friends #newthings https://www.instagram.com/p/CNjMgPtlIoQ/?igshid=1rfvx96fe85f8
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diversetv · a day ago
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Another amazing show last night on Writings on the Wall. Thank you to all of the writers who shared your talents and your voices =)
If you enjoy poetry and creative writing, check out the link below to see the show and discover many original writings and the people behind them.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHexbS6hS1U
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perpetual-stories · a day ago
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Types of Story Conflicts
hello, hello! hope everyone is having a wonderful day! today this post will be discussing the different types of conflicts that readers can find in stories.
i won't lolly-gag with too much introduction. i'll just get right to the point!
1. Person vs. Person:
this type of conflict creates friction between friends and lovers or protagonists and antagonists.
this is a very common type of conflict - a classic if you will.
a person struggling over victory over the other person.
there have been numerous examples of this type of conflict.
a popular example can be seen in Victor Hugo's Les Miserables. The popular conflict between Jean Valjean and Javert.
another example is between Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader.
2. Person vs. Nature:
this type of conflict readers find humankind against mother nature, their environment or natural disasters.
the characters are often seen trying to exert dominance over nature.
Herman Melville's Moby Dick; it tells the story of a man's obsession with overcoming nature—specifically, a whale.
Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea is another example of man vs. nature.
3. Person vs. Fate /God:
these conflicts occur when the character is trapped by destiny
these can often in found in Greek tragedies.
Oedipus is fated to marry his own mother, and kill his father despite all the precautions taken to prevent it from happening.
4. Person vs. Self:
the characters in this conflict are often battling between two desires or selves, good or bad.
this type of conflict is probably one of my favorite ones.
i associate it with psychological thrillers even though it doesn't have to be.
one of my favorite novels that perfectly portrays this type of conflict is Crime and Punishment. After Raskolnikov commits murder he becomes paranoid to the point where he drives himself crazy, having a constant battle of turmoil and guilt with his decision.
5. Person vs. Society:
ah yes, the dystopian genre.
this shows the struggles of individuals and the social codes they must face in their world.
the individual or group may or may not be successful in overcoming their problem in their world.
one example of this is George Orwell's Animal Farm. Characters struggle between corrupt powers and power structures.
1984 by the same author is also another example of person vs. society. In this fictional world, Big Brother monitors everyone and everything. Leaving very little freedom to its dwellers.
6. Person vs. Supernatural / Unknown
this is also another favorite type of conflict that I enjoy a lot.
Stephen King is an excellent author known to write this kind of conflicts in his stories.
it puts the characters against the paranormal or otherworld events.
Stephen King's The Shining is an excellent example (as well as a lot of other of his novels.)
7. Person vs. Technology
this type of genre has become popular over the last hundreds of years.
it places characters against scientific discoveries, and artificial intelligence.
Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey, for example, pits astronaut Dave Bowman against the super-intelligent HAL 9000, which believes Dave's shortcomings as a human being mean he must be forcibly removed from the mission.
There you have it folks! Different conflicts you as writers can utilize when writing your next short story or novel. I know this was a short post, but not everything can be long!
If you found this useful reblog, comment, and like. Feel free to share on Instagram and tag me at perpetualstories.
Follow me on Tumblr and Instagram for more writing and grammar tips and more!
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d-l-egan · a day ago
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my fingers prance,
upon black and white
i race to meet the tempo
a tiny smile
warmth in my chest
music notes look like legless men
my mind is empty,
but my fingers,
remember where to go
chasing the moment
my body sways
keys slam
gentle, little bounces
pedal
a note lingers
my finger stretches,
to the black key
a delicately lifted foot,
halts what lingers
by D. L. Egan
。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。
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womanasriot · a day ago
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Consent matters. I wrote this after a friend told me about a bad experience she had at a party (pre-pandemic times) with a guy who did not seem to understand her lack of interest in him. He even asked her at one point if he was making her uncomfortable and when she said he was he was like, "well you should at least be flattered." Um... excuse me. No. No she should not. There's nothing flattering about someone blatantly ignoring what you're telling them. There's nothing flattering about being made to feel uncomfortable when you're in a setting where you should be able to have fun. #womanasriot #alanahayes #poem #poet #poetry #poemsofinstagram #poetsofinstagram #poetryofinstagram #writersofinstagram #writersofig #poemsofig #poetsofig #poetryofig #poetryporn #poetrycommunity #honeybee #queenbee #bumblebee #rap #feminist #feminism #consentmatters #rapeculture #consentcounts #consent https://www.instagram.com/p/CNiU8YqF5oo/?igshid=lgavnrf0sr92
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Relationships are harder now because conversations become texting, arguments become phone calls, and feelings become status updates.
- NicK 11-Apr-2021 11:46 PM
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aileywrites · a day ago
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Writing Royals Part 2
 The last part was all tips about how to write royal characters, and my apparently controversial opinions on certain things, like corsets......Anyways, I have two more tips I wanted to share about writing royal characters, and some questions I use when I’m about writing the people surrounding the royal family: the royal court!!! Every country with a monarchy or any similar system is gonna have a royal court around them. These people included advisors, favorites, ambassadors, and servants. Getting the dynamic of your royal court perfect often depends on how you write these characters, so here we go!
Homegirl, Where Are Your Guards???
There is nothing that bothers me more than when a royal character is like in the middle of a war or their people are rebelling and they’re like, “ugh, I hate having all these guards around me. I just want to be free!!!!!” Which, okay fine, having a bunch of people follow you around and stand outside while you pee, and generally watching your every move does not sound fun at all, but getting offed doesn’t sound fun either. If your character’s country is in the middle of a war, and even if they aren’t depending on the country, they are going to have guards around them all the time. In Tudor England, guards would sleep in the King’s room even if he had company because people were always trying to assassinate each other. Even if your royal character has magic or powers or something, they still probably need guards. If your characters have been royal all their lives, they probably will know their guards very well and know how to sneak away from them for that oh so coveted night in the town as a commoner. But, even though royalty probably did feel claustrophobic with all those guards surrounding them, especially in the Victorian era right up until the end of World War 1, everyone’s biggest fear was being assassinated. People were getting offed and assassinated left and right, so take that into account when your character oh so desperately wants to leave the palace. 
Above the Law, Cause You Are the Law
I’m pretty sure that has been the motto of like almost every medieval to late Renaissance European monarch. Don’t get me wrong, there have definitely been good, benevolent monarchs who actually care about the needs and requests of their people, but then you get to Henry the 8th, and you’re like....., but that’s how it was back then, and even to an extent now. Royalty and nobility get away with so much shit that would send a normal person to prison, just look at Prince Andrew. Having all of that power and prestige, combined with being in charge of a country and being pretty much exempt from a lot of things can lead your royal or noble characters to have an inaccurate sense of right and wrong. Using Henry the 8th as an example, pretty much half of the things he decided in his life can be summed up with, “it’s okay when Henry does it, but if anyone else does it, then I’m offing them” That can create really good conflict if your royal character is forced to finally face the consequences of some of their actions, despite having gotten away with everything since they were a kid. 
So, now that we’ve got your royal family figured out, it’s time to get into the royal court. Here are some basic questions that I asked myself when I was writing my royal court for my current, wip!
How big is the total court?- And when I mean court, I don’t just mean the nobles, I mean like everyone, the cooks, gardeners, everyone. I know I’m using Tudor England a lot as my example, but y’all know the Tudors and Henry Cavill own my heart. Anyways, Henry the 8th’s official household could have up to 800 people at one time, and anyone of his various Queens could have another 200 people at their disposal. That’s a lot of people.
What factions exist within the court?- In the words of James Madison, factions forming is pretty much inevitable. Inevitably, people are gonna have similar interests and agendas, and those people will often band together to bring down other people who have the opposite agendas as them. Royal factions are some of the best ways to add some intrigue and spicy conflict to your story.
Where does the court meet?- All royal courts center around the Monarch, but where does the monarch live? Does the Monarch move around throughout the year? In my wip, all the Sovereigns live in their own territories during the summer months, but during the winter months, they all live together at Brookshire. The location of your court can play a big role in how power is consolidated in your world. 
Who all is in the court at any given time?- This questions is probably one of the most important questions when you’re building your royal court. The people close to the monarch who protect them, love them, or spy on them. These people, in some scenarios, might have more control over the country than the monarch themselves. They might scheme to control the monarch, marry them, or kill them. 
For your convenience, here is a list of people that might be at a royal court at any given time sourced from: https://ryanlanz.com
The monarch(s) – Regardless of what titles you give them, this person or duo is the center of a royal court; she defines the rest of the court. If the monarch consists of two people they are most likely either married or siblings, sometimes both depending on the culture and age.
The monarch’s family – people related to the monarch by blood, adoption or marriage fall into this category, and these people might or might not have their own titles and additional positions, though not necessarily always officially. Consider how younger royal siblings might be sent places to be married off, and be expected to function as ambassadors without the pay, or the many hats that a dowager queen might wear in her “retirement.”
Ambassadors – these men and women come from other kingdoms but they’re vital to functioning on a wider scale. They communicate their lady’s desires, intents and goals, as well as bring her insider news from the courts where they are appointed. When things are going well, they command a lot of respect and power, but if their two countries are on the outs, their lives are almost certainly in danger. Keep in mind too that ambassadors are likely to have their own households, and there might be a junior ambassador in play as well.
Nobles – At any given time, a royal court is bound to be packed with the country’s gentry, there to doing things such as discuss business, introduce a child for courting, serve the crown for their appointed time or because they are so active in politics because they make their home wherever the Queen does. Unlike ambassadors who are primarily going to be focused on inter-country negotiations, noblemen and women will have their own agendas to further their families, and while you’d like to think that they’re all loyal to the crown and their country, sometimes their own ambitions might get in the way.
Court Fool/Jester – We like to think of the court fool as someone who is, genuinely, a fool, but that’s often not the case. The Fool is a useful tool for the monarch because he distracts the court, and more often than not acts as a spy, passing along tidbits of overheard information or sightings–after all, who pays attention to the simpletons?
Courtiers – Courtiers are different from nobles in that they are people whose talents or ambition have brought them to court seeking the next rung on their ladder, rather than people whose daily business has brought them to the Queen’s presence. They are here to make a name for themselves, and can almost always be counted on to act in their own best interests, unless motivated by an exceptional force. These types are often at court on their own dime.
Resident military commanders – Military commanders are not likely to be regular fixtures at court, as they’re needed with their forces. But the highest ranking among them are going to be in nearly constant contact with the monarch (or the monarch’s representative, as is sometimes the case) and that will often necessitate being physically present at court.
Guests – Whether from outside of the country, rich or poor, landed or not, the royal court is ALWAYS going to have guests, and a well-established court is going to have provisions for housing and caring for a large number of them. A person’s station and/or possible value to the crown might determine wherein a castle they are housed and how they are treated, but if you write in a few guests consider that their perspective could be useful in defining the court as a whole.
Semi-permanent guests – These guests are people who don’t necessarily belong at court, and while their stay might be lengthy, it is well established that it will not be permanent. Examples of these kinds of people might be businessmen appointed to oversee some long term prospects, or the children of foreign nobles who have been sent to another country to be educated.
The monarch’s favorites – These could be really good characters for you to develop in depth. They’re essentially wild cards, and as they are favorites of the Queen, they have the potential to be outlandish or scandalous, hated or misunderstood, but the love and blind eye from the Queen keeps them nearby… tethered.
Royal lords and ladies – It will be rare for any ruler to find themselves alone; their personal attendants live to see to their needs and are never going to be far from hand. These politically powerful positions are likely to be jostled over a great deal, especially if the monarch is young, and might overlap somewhat with the royal favorites. Sometimes these people are lifelong companions and sometimes they are placed strategically close to the monarch for certain goals but regardless of how they came to be there, they are likely to share in the fine things, wealth, power and danger that surrounds a royal.
Sponsored artists – Sponsored artists could easily be labeled courtiers, except that it wasn’t usually their idea to come to court, and they’re not there for their own ambition. If the wealthy of your world are at all inclined to supporting the arts – drawing, painting, writing, performance, design, etc – they’re likely going to want to show off their investments, so in this regard these artists are usually nothing more than accessories. Though being a court is always a good way to increase one’s sales.
Guards – Any court is likely to have several levels of protective personnel, all the way from those hired by the royal household to keep the general peace and take care of grunt work  to personal, more elite bodyguards. This is another varied group that can include any number of peoples, skill level, objectives and professional capacity, but everybody who’s anybody is going to have one or two. Eunuchs might also fall into this category–those maimed men who have been conscripted in guarding typically women whose virtue is deemed vitally important.
Servants – Another highly varied group, but no less vital to the functioning of a royal castle and court. Servants might hold roles such as cooks, head cooks, librarians, messengers, laundresses, seamstresses, housekeeping, tasters, children’s nurses, ushers, grooms, heralds, and gardeners. If you world isn’t very progressive, some of these roles might also be filled with slaves or bonded servants.
Harem members – This again will depend largely on your story itself, but if the King or Queen is going to be flitting from bed to bed, there’s likely to be a group of bedmates hanging around for royal pleasure. Whether or not this group is well respected or received (or even publically visible) is up to you.
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