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#tolkien
beolh27 minutes ago
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Tyelpe and dad morning routine
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one-guy-long-time-ago46 minutes ago
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馃幖Makalaur毛 Kanafinwe/Maglor 馃幖 not exactly drowned (or is he?馃憖), but definitely associated with water.
I tried a different brush
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burning-quesadilla2 hours ago
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Legolas: Change is inedible.
Mairon: Don't you mean inevitable?
Legolas, spitting out coins: No, I did not.
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sulsulzukohere3 hours ago
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Varda Elent谩ri, Queen of the Valar.
I like to imagine the Vala as ethereal beings, both beautiful and inhuman.
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crownlessliestheking3 hours ago
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[Spongebob narrator voice] Ten months later....
I finally finished the second chapter of this fic, goddamn. Canon-compliant Silvergifting in this one, specifically towards the end, so. Be warned. Referenced torture, etc.
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Poor Hector. Hector needs hugs and therapy and his pug back
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quixoticly4 hours ago
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when one of your mutuals are in a fandom you aren't/don't plan to be a part of but they keep reblogging the funniest posts so you start catching the references and inside jokes so you end up with this really warm feeling towards something you've never seen in your life. that's neat,,
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The reasons I think Maedhros and Maglor had a close relationship with each other are:
Maedhros entrusted the crown to Maglor while he went to go deal with Morgoth
When Mae has to head out to the big feast Fingolfin is throwing, Mags was the only brother he took along with him.
When the Easterlings betrayed Maedhros, Maglor was the one to personally kill their leader.
They stuck together through the end when their last brothers died.
They took care of Elrond and Elros together.
When push came to shove, Maglor submitted to the will of his brother, even though he voiced more of his misgivings.
All those things imply that even if they weren鈥檛 besties, there鈥檚 definitely a certain amount of loyalty, trust and rapport between them. So much so that they were together through the literal end.
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newagepromo5 hours ago
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饾櫝饾櫢饾殏饾櫜饾櫨饾殎饾櫝 饾殎饾櫨饾櫥饾櫞饾櫩饾櫥饾櫚饾殘 饾殏饾櫞饾殎饾殔饾櫞饾殎. // post-endgame. multi-fandom.
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phoenixrisesoncemore5 hours ago
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Quotes from Tolkien鈥檚 On Fairy-stories 鈥 part 12
鈥淚n what the misusers are fond of calling Real Life, Escape is evidently as a rule very practical, and may even be heroic. In real life it is difficult to blame it, unless it fails; in criticism it would seem to be the worse the better it succeeds. Evidently we are faced by a misuse of words, and also by a confusion of thought. Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if, when he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls?鈥
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elcorhamletlive5 hours ago
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absolutely wild that even one person on this earth has ever shipped anything other than sam and frodo, ever
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tar-isilme5 hours ago
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Anyone would believe that at this point of my life as a Tolkien fan I would no longer find surprises about this universe, but than we have the discovery of the Russian version of "The Lord Of The Rings", and now this:
youtube
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tyelkormo6 hours ago
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silvergifting good ending
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Six: The Musical except it鈥檚 starring the Feanorion bros telling their own stories. And Mags put it together.
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ellaofoakhill7 hours ago
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My Thoughts on Stakes...
I鈥檓 thinking this鈥檒l probably be shorter than my usual posts on writing and storytelling, but we鈥檒l see. Anyway, this is just my personal take on stakes.
Which is that *drum roll* you don鈥檛 actually need stakes to tell a story that people will read. Crazy, right? But I mean, the slice-of-life genre exists for a reason. Is it an outrageously popular genre? Maybe not, at least not in the West; Japan has s-o-l and a related genre, iyashikei (I鈥檝e previously reblogged a definition of the latter if you鈥檙e interested), and both are more popular over there. Why? I dunno, but I suspect there鈥檚 less of a stigma against escapism in Eastern cultures; Miyazaki talks about the concept of ma in an interview, and how he works that space for breath into his movies, and it makes me think that there鈥檚 a relation between the two. I could talk about how Western culture, from our schedules to our media, encourage a constant state of doing without stopping to rest and simply be, but that鈥檚 a subject in and of itself, and I鈥檓 already off-topic.
The purpose of stakes is to introduce tension to your story, or to escalate tension. Your character(s) want x, or want to prevent x from happening; the greater the impact of not getting or preventing x on your characters, the higher your stakes. And the higher your stakes, the more invested your audience will be, so the logic goes.
Popular media of a more adventurous persuasion often takes this very literally, and puts the entire world/galaxy/universe in jeopardy, because what will affect your characters more than the entire world blowing up, amiright?
...
... No, actually, you鈥檙e not.
Red from Overly Sarcastic Productions (yes, I know, I reference her a lot, her stuff is just SO GOOD you should watch it) has a video on Youtube talking about the end of the world, and if I may summarize/paraphrase her, stakes don鈥檛 work like that; chances are, few things will affect your characters more than the blowing up of their personal, subjective world. In Andy Weir鈥檚 Artemis (spoilers ahead), the highest stakes throughout the book are whether or not the protagonist can save the inhabitant鈥檚 of humanity鈥檚 first lunar colony, comprising at most a few thousand people. According to the above logic, that should be a 鈥淵eah, sure, kinda interesting鈥, but it was pretty suspenseful because the lives of people we knew and liked were at stake, not the whole world.
Humanity is growing more interconnected than ever before, but most of us have a few hundred people whom we perceive as having impact on our lives; everyone else is mostly treated with indifference. Not because we鈥檙e a cold, apathetic species, but our conscious minds aren鈥檛 capable of making deep emotional connections beyond that point.
Another part of this is that the audience is taking something of a gamble with every story they pick up. Does it end happily, or sadly? Marriage or death? And while there is certainly some satisfaction derived from a well-written tragedy, that鈥檚 really hard to pull off when the story鈥檚 entire world is destroyed and stays destroyed, to the point that I can think of precisely one example that did make it work: The Cabin in the Woods (and there are a few asterisks there, like it being a horror movie). So unless you can pull off one of the most difficult tasks any writer has ever attempted, you probably won鈥檛 write the end of the world, or even the end of your characters鈥 world, though that鈥檚 a more realistic goal. Remember that gamble the audience is taking? If you put forward the End of the World in a full-length novel (short-stories have more leeway because the audience investment is usually in the low tens of pages, and not in the mid to high hundreds), the odds of you writing it and satisfying your audience are so astronomically tiny that most authors aren鈥檛 going to actually write it. So the audience bets that your protagonists will prevail in preventing it. And they鈥檙e almost certainly right.
Let鈥檚 say you pick up a book, regardless of genre, set in a small town. There are good people, and decent people, and a few creeps. Most of the book takes place in this small town, and the author really writes characters well, to the point that there are a few characters you adore despite deep, nuanced faults, and some you hate with a fiery passion, even if they have redeeming qualities. This small town feels real to you, and while the story alludes to a wider world, grounds itself in this wider world, the meat of the story is here, wherever here is. We grow with our characters along this journey, and love this beautiful tapestry the author鈥檚 woven for us.
And then we find out that one character we love is going to die.
The world will keep on turning. This town will keep on living. In that literal, objective sense, the stakes are pretty low. But this light that鈥檚 kept us reading for five, six, seven hundred pages, will soon be snuffed out. And if the author has written this story half so well as I鈥檝e described, the ending could be good even if, or perhaps because this character dies. In short, this character鈥檚 death is a very realistic outcome.
I鈥檇 bet the farm you鈥檙e more invested in this one character than in any number of worlds. In fact, a lot of those stories know the audience knows the EotW won鈥檛 happen, and so the suspense and shock, and plot twisting, if they鈥檙e written well, comes from which of our beloved characters will die.
And they don鈥檛 even have to die, really; even a protagonist not getting what they want can devastate your audience.
I once heard (and I wish I could remember the source of this) that in poetry, anyone can write of grand and noble ideas and objects, and sound wise, even profound, but it takes a true master of the art to appreciate and bring forth profundity in the mundane, the small, the innocuous. I think the same can be said of fiction; not that we all need to write literary fiction (good luck prising the dragons from my cold dead hands), but that maybe rather than writing grand sweeping vistas and great armies, we could write all the little happenings in a single tree. Travelling the length and breadth of an entire fantasy world can be a fun time, don鈥檛 get me wrong (Paolini was one of my favourite authors growing up), but if writing grand adventures ever gets stale for you... maybe try writing about that tree. Its breadth might not impress, but them roots might grow deeper than you ever imagined.
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I was finally done with this but then I had to go and MANUALLY FIX THE DAMN COLORS because it decided to save way too brightly, turned all my grays into whites, made Val's skin orange and I was just really mad. Well now I finally got it the way I want it again, the brightness did one thing...at least the glitter is shinier.
So this is Curumo and Valarie, my OC for his wife back when they were still in Valinor. They bonded over their creative pursuits, Curumo was in the middle of tinkering with something (hence the wrench) and Val's trying to compose this song hoping it'll come together.
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phoenixrisesoncemore7 hours ago
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Quotes from Tolkien鈥檚 On Fairy-stories 鈥 part 11
鈥淩ecovery (which includes return and renewal of health) is a re-gaining 鈥 regaining of a clear view. I do not say 鈥榮eeing things as they are鈥 and involve myself with the philosophers, though I might venture to say 鈥榮eeing things as we are (or were) meant to see them鈥 鈥 as things apart from ourselves. We need, in any case, to clean our windows; so that the things seen clearly may be freed from the drab blur of triteness or familiarity 鈥 from possessiveness. [...] This triteness is really the penalty of 鈥榓ppropriation鈥: the things that are trite, or (in a bad sense) familiar, are the things that we have appropriated, legally or mentally. We say we know them. They have become like the things which once attracted us by their glitter, or their colour, or their shape, and we laid hands on them, and then locked them in our hoard, acquired them, and acquiring ceased to look at them. [...] Creative fantasy, because it is mainly trying to do something else (make something new), may open your hoard and let all the locked things fly away like cage-birds. The gems all turn into flowers or flames, and you will be warned that all you had (or knew) was dangerous and potent, not really effectively chained, free and wild; no more yours than they were you.鈥
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newagepromo7 hours ago
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calling all crossover positive roleplayers! we here at new age are a long standing discord roleplay server聽primarily based in mcu鈥檚 post-endgame world, crossing over into multiple fandoms including but not limited to: marvel comics, dc comics, dceu, snk, the magicians, the silmarillion, titans, agents of shield.聽
we鈥檇 love聽to see more characters and while we do have a most wanted list in our main blog, this isn鈥檛 to say other characters wouldn鈥檛 be welcome! have a flick through some of our pages, have a look over what we鈥檝e got to come and look forward to-- drop an im or an ask by the main blog if you have any questions. come and join our world, perfect for people with a love for writing聽and delving into an expansive world.聽
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wizardsandwenches7 hours ago
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Ad没naphel the Quiet
脷lair毛 Ots毛a, Seventh of the Nine, bearer of Sapth芒n the Foolstone.
Ad没naphel was unusual among her number, as the only woman to have accepted a ring of power from the Dark Lord. No less vicious than the other wicked kings of men during her time period, she overtly controlled much of Harad's coastline during the Second Age as Ard the Vain. She was ambitious, desiring to see the dominion of N煤menor over Middle-earth and hated elves to a great extent. She was close in friendship with her compatriot from the Far East, Kham没l.
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