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#minas morgul
montparnassee · 5 days ago
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Minas Morgul
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A new Tolkien piece I intended to sell but took a liking to. I'm back on my Tolkien streak so will be selling more pieces from both the Silm and LOTR. HMU if you want a treacherous Tolkien landscape!
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huggable-hobbit · 5 days ago
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New phone theme!
I based it off of cirith ungol/shelob's lair/Minas morgul.
One of my favorite parts in the movies.
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bilbo-peggings · 19 days ago
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Guess who's back on their MMO bullshit? It's me, and I'm taking selfies with Sauron.
I know it's a long shot but does anyone else here play LOTRO?
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outlawiism · 21 days ago
whispers dibs because i lub you and i am never leaving ever again
-clings to- no leaving ever again bc what would peter do without clint and kurt and what would i do without you brightening my day whenever we talk i would RIOT 😐
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calaear · a month ago
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The Black Gate Minas Morgul Dawnless Day - from the Prow of Minas Tirith
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tolkienillustrations · 2 months ago
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Minas Morgul by Jason Potratz and Jack Hai
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timewandererus · 2 months ago
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Many treasures and great heirlooms of virtue and wonder the Exiles had brought from Númenor; and of these the most renowned were the Seven Stones
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'They set up Stones at Minas Anor, and at Minas Ithil, and at Orthanc in the ring of Isengard. The chief and master of these was under the Dome of Stars at Osgiliath before its ruin.
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At smallest they were about a foot in diameter, but some, certainly the Stones of Osgiliath and Amon Sûl, were much larger and could not be lifted by one man.
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'Who knows where the lost Stones of Arnor and Gondor now lie buried, or drowned deep? But one, at least Sauron must have obtained and mastered to his purposes. I guess that it was the Ithil-stone, for he took Minas Ithil long ago and turned it into an evil place: Minas Morgul, it has become.'
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'Now it appears that, as the rock of Orthanc has withstood the storms of time, so there the palantír of that tower has remained. But alone it could do nothing but see small images of things far off and days remote. Very useful, no doubt, that was to Saruman; yet it seems that he was not content. Further and further abroad he gazed, until he cast his gaze upon Barad-dûr. Then he was caught!'
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It was afterwards believed that needing knowledge, but being proud, and trusting in his own strength of will, [Denethor] dared to look in the palantír of the White Tower. None of the Stewards had dared to do this, nor even the kings Eärnil and Eärnur, after the fall of Minas Ithil when the palantír of Isildur came into the hands of the Enemy; for the Stone of Minas Tirith was the palantír of Anárion, most close in accord with the one that Sauron possessed.
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It is said that the towers of Emyn Beraid... were raised by Gil-galad for Elendil, his friend; and the Seeing Stone of Emyn Beraid was set in Elostirion, the tallest of the towers.
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But we are told it was unlike the others and not in accord with them; it looked only to the Sea. Elendil set it there so that he could look back with 'straight sight' and see Eressëa in the vanished West; but the bent seas below covered Númenor for ever.
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Thither Elendil would repair, and thence he would gaze out over the sundering seas, when the yearning of exile was upon him; and it is believed that thus he would at whiles see far away even the Tower of Avallónë upon Eressëa, where the Master-stone abode, and yet abides.
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fjell-652 · 2 months ago
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A long-tilted valley, a deep gulf of shadow, ran back far into the mountains. Upon the further side, some way within the valley's arms, high on a rocky seat upon Ephel Dúath, stood the walls and towers of Minas Morgul. All was dark about it, earth and sky, but it was lit with light. Not the light welling through the marble walls of Minas Ithil long ago, fair and radiant in the hollow of the hills. Paler indeed than the moon ailing in some slow eclipse was the light of it now, wavering and blowing like a noisome exhalation of decay, a corpse-light, a light that illuminated nothing.
The Two Towers, "The Stairs of Cirith Ungol"
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ravenkult · 3 months ago
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Minas Morgul Inspiration: Concept art by Guillaume T. Delbarre https://www.artstation.com/artwork/Xn2zny
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Sauron: I name thee Witch-King of Angmar!
Angmar: ...Wait, so I’m king of the witches?
Sauron: No, you’re a king who is also expertly skilled in the malefic arts. Therefore, you are a witch and a king.
Angmar: “Witch” here being gender neutral?
Sauron: Oh Fucking Melkor in the Void, YES! “Witch” is applicable to any gender identity! You’re a King who is also a Witch! Hence, “Witch,” hyphen, “King!”
Angmar: This is going to confuse people.
Sauron: Like I care! It’ll do some good for people both to broaden their minds and learn what a hyphen does. That’s two acts of goodness I’ve performed, and I’m not going to do anything decent after this!
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writeshirty · 5 months ago
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Shout out to LOTR Scenery. Thought you might like this. it is Sigiriya, the Lion Rock Sri-Lanka... Minas Morgul? Dol Guldur?
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bluestaratsunrise · 6 months ago
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Wicked Witch by Middle Earth Reflections
The Nazgûl firmly belong to the category of the most terrifying characters in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Legendarium. Many a reader have undoubtedly had their dreams haunted by Sauron’s evil servants: their appearance is enough to chill one’s blood. The Lord of the Nine is especially powerful and horrifying. Fear goes before him and, when gathered together under their leader, the Nine are a true terror. As it was often the case with Tolkien, the Professor used several names in reference to the Lord of the Nazgûl, all of which reveal various traits of his personality. Today we are going to look at the title of the Witch-king of Angmar and what it can tell us about its bearer.
A careful look at the name Witch-king will uncover a lot of interesting details. I will start with the element ‘witch’. These days this word is traditionally used about women, and those men that are associated with witchcraft go under other names, like a sorcerer, a wizard or a warlock. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a witch as “a woman thought to have magic powers, especially evil ones, popularly depicted as wearing a black cloak and pointed hat and flying on a broomstick”. Apart from evil powers and black clothing giving shape to his nothingness, our Witch-King does not share any other traits with the popular stereotype of modern witches. He is definitely not female and his transport of choice seems far more comfortable than a broomstick. Besides, being the chief, he opts for a crown rather than a pointed hat. To understand the meaning behind the part ‘witch’ in this title we need to go back in history and speculate a bit.
In Old English there were two words for those dealing with black arts: wicce was the word for a female practitioner and wicca was used for a male one. Both nouns are believed to have been derived from the verb wiccian — ‘to practise witchcraft’. Judging by the presence of both words in the language we can conclude that practising witchcraft was common among men and women alike. Various kinds of practitioners of evil magic were mentioned in the Laws of Alfred and the homilies of Ælfric, and both sources were very specific about witchcraft: those who practised it were outlawed and were not to be approached or consulted by people.
In Middle Ages things changed and there appeared one word instead of two. It was wicche applied to both men and women. During the course of time two things happened: wicche had changed its spelling to become witch by XVI century and began to be applied more to women than to men, who were increasingly referred to as warlocks, sorcerers or wizards. The application of witch to men survived only in some regional dialects or such combinations as he-witch or men-witches [3]. Nowadays witches are predominantly female.
Let us now see how all that applies to the Witch-king of Angmar. In the world of Arda Tolkien did not have many magical terms or titles, but the ones he did have were usually very carefully chosen and applied. The term wizard became reserved for the Istari, and thus had a positive connotation to show their great knowledge as opposed to magical skills. So, by building the title of the Witch-king with the word witch, Tolkien supplied it with a negative connotation and showed that the character in question was evil, with dark magical powers which he did not shun using in his service to Sauron.
The chief Ringwraith became known as the Witch-king when he founded the realm of Angmar with the sole purpose of destroying the remaining Dúnedain, “and there were gathered many evil men, and Orcs, and other fell creatures” (Return of the King, p. 389). This association with fell and evil creatures might be the source of the witch-element in the title. Moreover, at first it was not known who exactly the lord of that realm was, and only later was it discovered that he was none other than the leader of the Nine Ringwraiths. It was also during his Angmar time that the Witch-king sent evil wights to haunt the region of the Barrow-downs. Thus the former settlement of the Dúnedain became the place of dread and horror. Later, when the hunt for the Ring commenced, the Black Captain returned to that region, spent some time there and it roused the evil wights again to be on the lookout for the Ringbearer.
Although the title of the Witch-king was gained by the chief Ringwraith on founding Angmar, he went on justifying it further into the Third Age: during the War of the Ring the Black Captain continued to show his evil magic powers. He instilled fear in those mortals meeting him and even some Orcs admitted to being scared of the Nazgûl and their malicious leader. Apart from fear, the Witch-king’s weapon of choice was a Morgul blade filled with dark spells and enchantments to give grave wounds to those pierced with it. He was also versed in spells, which was seen during the siege of Gondor:
Then the Black Captain rose in his stirrups and cried aloud in a dreadful voice, speaking in some forgotten tongue words of power and terror to rend both heart and stone.
Thrice he cried. Thrice the great ram boomed. And suddenly upon the last stroke the Gate of Gondor broke. As if stricken by some blasting spell it burst asunder: there was a flash of searing lightning, and the doors tumbled in riven fragments to the ground.
(Return of the King, p. 112-113)
Something very similar was performed by the Lord of the Nine when the Ringwraiths were pursuing Frodo mounted on Asfaloth. From the other side of the ford the Witch-king’s rising in the stirrups and raising a hand had a very evil influence on Frodo and broke the Hobbit’s sword into pieces. His ability to meddle with wills and minds also firmly belongs to the category of the misuse of magic.
The king-element in this compound noun is also no coincidence. Having been named the Witch-king on founding Angmar, the main Ringwraith became its lord and ruler, which explains the royal title. He was also the most powerful and fearsome of the Nazgûl and later, when the War of the Ring was in progress, he showed his leader qualities just like he had done before. To reinforce his high position the Lord of the Nine was wearing a crown:
The Black Rider flung back his hood, and behold! he had a kingly crown; and yet upon no head visible was it set. The red fires shone between it and the mantled shoulders vast and dark. From a mouth unseen there came a deadly laughter.
(Return of the King, p. 113)
Thus the title of the Witch-king reveals to readers that its bearer is an evil supernatural captain skilful in black magic, having immense power and able to rule and subdue. That is what we can gather on coming across this word: as it was his wont, Tolkien put quite a lot of information into names and titles and they could reveal quite a lot of facts about characters.
Stylistically, I see some very interesting decisions in the compound Witch-king. Tolkien’s usage of ‘witch’ seems to be gender-neutral neutral here, just as it used to be in the past. It stresses the fact that the Lord of the Nazgûl often applied evil magic, and this word choice is intended to set him apart from the Istari otherwise called Wizards ― the term with a positive and non-magical connotation in the world of Arda. His usage of black magic is also the reason why the Witch-king is sometimes called the sorcerer ― the term often applied to those with the knowledge of evil magic in the world of Tolkien. The king-element points to the high status of this character: not only did it survive from the times of his founding the realm of Angmar, but it also highlighted him as the most powerful of the nine Ringwraiths. Besides, what I see the king-element also does in this title is that it gives gender to the otherwise gender-neutral word. Witch became associated with women through usage, but it was born out of the word used for males and females alike, and it does not have any grammatical indications of gender in the same way as, for example, the suffix -ess in sorceress does. Thus combining witch with the distinctively male word king results in clearly specifying from the very start that the character in question is male.
Further Reading:
Wraiths the writhen
The Games of Sorcerers
When the Nine are abroad
Those who know
Works consulted:
1). J. R. R. Tolkien – The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring; HarperCollinsPublishers; London; 2001.
2). J. R. R. Tolkien – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King; HarperCollinsPublishers; London; 2001.
3.) Etymonline.com
4.) The Oxford English Dictionary
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villainquoteoftheday · 7 months ago
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“‘Yet now under the Lord of Bara-dûr the most fell of all his captains is already master of [Gondor’s] outer walls. King of Angmar long ago, Sorcerer, Ringwraith, Lord of the Nazgûl, a spear of terror in the hand of Sauron, shadow of despair.’”
-from The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien
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silverstreamstothesea · 7 months ago
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I'm sure its been talked about, time and time again, but I genuinely don't think Frodo or Sam were wrong on the hidden staircase. Sam, who knows Frodo's burden but could never understand it, who has been eternally loyal, kind, and strong, is merely trying to help Frodo.
Frodo, carrying a weight none could understand (like the evilest of deeds, all piled on his shoulders. All the blood of the world staining his hands. Guilt and fear and hatred, always on the mind) and so completely exhausted, loves Sam, but hears only the voices of Boromir, Aragorn, Galadriel, and others who, despite their best selves, would take and use the ring, and so sends Sam away.
They are in an impossible situation, surrounded by constant darkness and fear and hate. That this is as far as it got, that Sam returned and Frodo apologized, genuinely, is a testament to their wills and their love for one another.
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oreliel-from-valinor · 8 months ago
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Evil places of the Legendarium - Minas Morgul
A long-tilted valley, a deep gulf of shadow, ran back far into the mountains. Upon the further side, some way within the valley's arms, high on a rocky seat upon Ephel Dúath, stood the walls and towers of Minas Morgul. All was dark about it, earth and sky, but it was lit with light. Not the light welling through the marble walls of Minas Ithil long ago, fair and radiant in the hollow of the hills. Paler indeed than the moon ailing in some slow eclipse was the light of it now, wavering and blowing like a noisome exhalation of decay, a corpse-light, a light that illuminated nothing.
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