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New study explains Mycobacterium tuberculosis high resistance to drugs and immunity
New study explains Mycobacterium tuberculosis high resistance to drugs and immunity
A consortium of researchers from Russia, Belarus, Japan, Germany and France led by a Skoltech scientist have uncovered the way in which Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in iron-deficient conditions by utilizing rubredoxin B, a protein from a rubredoxin family that play an important role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. The new study is part of an effort to study the role of…
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sqadiacom · 14 days ago
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sqadia.com are here to ensure that you learn the most before your exams. So, we bring you our “essentials of microbiology” series. Let us learn about “Antibacterial Therapy” today, we will give an overview the factors that govern the choice of therapy, routes of administration, why to monitor therapy, and the adverse effects of antibiotic therapy.
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biotechstudentlife · 18 days ago
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Mcq of bacterial nutrition Full detail on blog Visit: link in bio Follow us @biotech_student_life #bacteria #microbiology #virus #covid #science #biology #coronavirus #health #laboratory #microbiologia #microbiologist #biotechnology #bacteriology #lab #medicine #germs #microscope #corona #viruses #fungi #biochemistry #research #microbes #dna #clean #microscopy #medical #scientist #staysafe #cell (at MGM's College Of CS & IT, Nanded) https://www.instagram.com/p/CM6laWxjCRt/?igshid=12m327b2eis7u
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ucsdhealthsciences · 21 days ago
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Repurposed Heart and Flu Drugs May Help Body Fight Sepsis
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Higher platelet counts linked to better outcomes for patients with staph sepsis; repurposed drugs that protect platelets improve survival of septic mice
Despite continued improvements in antibiotics and hospital intensive care, staph sepsis — a bloodstream infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria — still causes severe illness or death in 20 to 30 percent of patients who contract it.
Rather than continue to throw more antibiotics at the problem, University of California San Diego researchers want to boost the other side of the equation: the patient’s own immune system.
The team recently discovered a battle that occurs between staph bacteria and platelets — blood cells known better for their role in clotting than in immune defense. In some sepsis cases, they found, the bacteria win out and platelet levels plummet. Patients with fewer platelets were more likely to die of staph sepsis than patients with higher platelet counts.
The researchers also determined that two currently available prescription medications, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other uses, protect platelets and improve survival in mouse models of staph sepsis. The two repurposed drugs were ticagrelor (Brilinta), a blood thinner commonly prescribed to prevent heart attack recurrence, and oseltamivir (Tamiflu), prescribed to treat the flu.
The study publishes March 24, 2021 in Science Translational Medicine.
“In many cases, the antibiotics we give these patients should be able to kill the bacteria, based on lab tests, yet a significant number of patients are not pulling through,” said senior author Victor Nizet, MD, Distinguished Professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “If we can reduce mortality in staph sepsis by 10 or 20 percent by arming or protecting the immune system, we can likely save more lives than discovering an additional new antibiotic that may still not cure the sickest patients.”
“Repurposed Heart and Flu Drugs May Help Body Fight Sepsis”
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zulkernaeen · a month ago
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Beating the biopirates: A journalist’s guide to biodiversity access and benefit-sharing.
There is a multi-billion-dollar yearly trade in medicines, foodstuffs and industrial products derived from plants, animals, fungi and bacteria. However, many such products have commercialised without any profits returning to the countries and communities whose biodiversity and traditional knowledge made the innovation possible. And in some cases, biological resources have been accessed illegally.
That is why, in 2010, parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) reached a new agreement — called the Nagoya Protocol — to ensure legal accesses and guarantee that any benefits arising from the use of genetic resources are shared fairly and equitably.
But what exactly is Access and benefit-sharing?
What are countries doing to meet their CBD commitments and ensure that companies meet their legal obligations? Are benefits flowing where they should?
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mmcguire390 · 2 months ago
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February 4, 1909: Second Use of Chlorine in the U.S.; 1877: Birth of C.E.A. Winslow
February 4, 1909: Second Use of Chlorine in the U.S.; 1877: Birth of C.E.A. Winslow
February 4, 1909: Dr. John L. Leal testified at the second Jersey City trial about the first use of chlorine for continuous disinfection of a U.S. water supply at Boonton Reservoir, which was the water supply for Jersey City, New Jersey. The transcript from February 5, 1909, revealed that Leal had also installed a chloride of lime feed system at the filtration plant at Little Falls, New Jersey.…
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microbioblog · 2 months ago
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When it comes to complex ecosystems, most people would picture any number of things before this:
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Stromatolites are made up of layers of matted bacteria that grow by precipitation of materials onto the surface. That means that stromatolites are essentially a special kind of biofilm that builds up over time, very similarly to how coral reefs develop.
A lot of bacteria live in these structures, and for a long time cyanobacteria were thought to be the main component because it's very easy to identify through microscopy, and most wild bacteria won't grow in lab conditions. They are also more abundant on the surface, which is generally easier to reach and lets them get more light.
Unfortunately stromatolites are now much less abundant than they were 600 million years ago due to grazing by multicellular organisms. Today they tend to be found only in shallow saline areas like Shark Bay in western Australia.
Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1183352/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5767316/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3538587/
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mmcguire390 · 3 months ago
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January 8, 1817: Tsunami on the Delaware Estuary; 1957: Death of C.E.A. Winslow
January 8, 1817: Tsunami on the Delaware Estuary; 1957: Death of C.E.A. Winslow
January 8, 1817:  Tsunami on the Delaware Estuary.  New geological modeling has suggested that a magnitude 7.4 earthquake occurred off of South Carolina in 1817. The resulting tsunami tossed boats around on the Delaware Estuary south of Philadelphia according to newspaper reports at the time. “The size and location, or epicenter, of the 1817 earthquake has never been pinned down so closely…
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mmcguire390 · 3 months ago
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December 27, 1822: Birth of Louis Pasteur
December 27, 1822: Birth of Louis Pasteur
December 27, 1822:  Birth of Louis Pasteur. “Pasteur was a French chemist and self-taught microbiologist who was one of the most important founders of medical microbiology. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and preventions of diseases. His discoveries reduced mortality from puerperal (or childbed) fever, and he created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His…
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omgitsfama · 4 months ago
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ioag · 5 months ago
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diffuse
unrecognized
(Bacillus sp AK on Blood agar with penicillin disc)
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ioag · 5 months ago
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diffuse 
decay 
(Bacillus sp. on a medium for the study of proteolytic activity)
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5h3r1f4 · 5 months ago
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Dear bacteriology: f*** off pls 😩🤯🤯.
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5h3r1f4 · 5 months ago
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Mycology and bacteriology at summer course was not a great idea!🤯
My brain is going to explode but I’m trying bc only few weeks left and I want good grades fasho!🥳.
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helpinguidedotcom · 6 months ago
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Airplane tray/tables contain more bacteria than household items. To know many more interesting facts about bacteria click on the link👇
https://www.helpinguide.com/bacteria
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raptorsandpoultry · 6 months ago
So, I'm not the best at ved med jargon and I hope this makes sense but you know how in agriculture, antibiotics can be overused leading to antibiotic resistance? Well, a while back I was in a farm store and saw a gamebird feed with probiotics in it (primalac to be exact). While breifly looking into it it looked promising but I wanna get an actual professionals opinion on it. Do you think probiotics could replace antibiotics or should agriculture go a different route? Thank you for your time!
Thanks for the great question, anon!
I want to start off by saying that any time antibiotics are used, whether it’s in human medicine, companion animal medicine, agriculture, etc., antibiotics have been/have the potential to be overused. As a result, physicians, public health officials, veterinarians, and scientists of all kinds are conducting research every day to address the issue and encourage rational antimicrobial therapy in all of these sectors - it’s not just agriculture that needs to go a different route. 
While I can’t speak for other countries, in Canada, antibiotics are split into four different categories based on how important they are in treating bacterial diseases in human patients, with Category I being the most crucial and strictly regulated. The Canadian poultry industry has banned the use of Category I and II antibiotics, and are looking to do the same for Category III this year. This would leave Category IV drugs, which are used in animals only, and never in human medicine.
Now, a probiotic is defined as a live microorganism that can be fed to an animal - the idea is that this microorganism (e.g. a harmless bacterial species or even a beneficial one) will live in the animal’s gastrointestinal tract and out-compete or physically crowd out harmful types of bacteria. An antibiotic is a medication that either kills or inhibits the growth of bacteria. In theory, both have the potential to cause bacteria to evolve adaptive mechanisms and produce antimicrobial resistance. Both of them need to be selected carefully to make sure that doesn’t happen - it’s not as simple as one replacing the other. The goal is to choose an appropriate probiotic, which will reduce the amount of appropriate antibiotic medication that needs to be given, if that makes sense.
Hope this helps clear things up!
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