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beckieletitia · 29 minutes ago
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Wednesday, June 23rd
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When you live in Cardiff, this is what "going for a walk around the park" means ☀️
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denkibran · 43 minutes ago
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Awareness to specialized <b>therapy</b> gains traction
JONESBORO — Starla Denton, owner of Pelvic Floor and Core Physical Therapy, said it's nice to finally see some interest in an often ignored group of ... from Google Alert - Physical Therapy https://ift.tt/3zQ1KlC
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fullyfadingengineer · 53 minutes ago
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Stiff back? Try loosening up with these gentle stretches
Stiff back? Try loosening up with these gentle stretches
Cleveland Clinic@ClevelandClinic·3mStretches to loosen up those tight back muscles: Try These Yoga Poses to Improve Your Lower Back FlexibilityStiff back? Try loosening up with these gentle stretcheshealth.clevelandclinic.org
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dogelien · 55 minutes ago
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𝓝𝓪𝓷𝓸𝓶𝓪𝓽𝓮𝓻𝓲𝓪𝓵𝓼 Nanomaterials can be defined as materials possessing, at minimum, one external dimension measuring 1-100nm. Nanomaterials can occur naturally, be created as the by-products of combustion reactions, or be produced purposefully through engineering to perform a specialised function. Some examples are given in the above picture 🖼️👆🏻 Follow us @dogelien 😊 yours support helps us to provide more informative posts and videos like this. @dogelien 👈🏻 #post #insta #instagood #instafood #instapic #instagram #nanotechnology #nanomaterials #science #sciencefacts #instaschool #information #physics #fun #share #like #follow_us #dogelien https://www.instagram.com/p/CQdHw9LA940/?utm_medium=tumblr
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bitchboyjackson · 56 minutes ago
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Just realized I’m going to have to pay attention and answer in physics class if I want to get made head girl 😭👍🏼
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spacetimewithstuartgary · 57 minutes ago
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Earth-like biospheres on other planets may be rare A new analysis of known exoplanets has revealed that Earth-like conditions on potentially habitable planets may be much rarer than previously thought. The work focuses on the conditions required for oxygen-based photosynthesis to develop on a planet, which would enable complex biospheres of the type found on Earth. The study is published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The number of confirmed planets in our own Milky Way galaxy now numbers into the thousands. However planets that are both Earth-like and in the habitable zone - the region around a star where the temperature is just right for liquid water to exist on the surface - are much less common. At the moment, only a handful of such rocky and potentially habitable exoplanets are known. However the new research indicates that none of these has the theoretical conditions to sustain an Earth-like biosphere by means of ‘oxygenic’ photosynthesis - the mechanism plants on Earth use to convert light and carbon dioxide into oxygen and nutrients. Only one of those planets comes close to receiving the stellar radiation necessary to sustain a large biosphere: Kepler−442b, a rocky planet about twice the mass of the Earth, orbiting a moderately hot star around 1,200 light years away. The study looked in detail at how much energy is received by a planet from its host star, and whether living organisms would be able to efficiently produce nutrients and molecular oxygen, both essential elements for complex life as we know it, via normal oxygenic photosynthesis. By calculating the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) that a planet receives from its star, the team discovered that stars around half the temperature of our Sun cannot sustain Earth-like biospheres because they do not provide enough energy in the correct wavelength range. Oxygenic photosynthesis would still be possible, but such planets could not sustain a rich biosphere. Planets around even cooler stars known as red dwarfs, which smoulder at roughly a third of our Sun’s temperature, could not receive enough energy to even activate photosynthesis. Stars that are hotter than our Sun are much brighter, and emit up to ten times more radiation in the necessary range for effective photosynthesis than red dwarfs, however generally do not live long enough for complex life to evolve. “Since red dwarfs are by far the most common type of star in our galaxy, this result indicates that Earth-like conditions on other planets may be much less common than we might hope,” comments Prof. Giovanni Covone of the University of Naples, lead author of the study. He adds: “This study puts strong constraints on the parameter space for complex life, so unfortunately it appears that the “sweet spot” for hosting a rich Earth-like biosphere is not so wide.” Future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), due for launch later this year, will have the sensitivity to look to distant worlds around other stars and shed new light on what it really takes for a planet to host life as we know it.
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neckpains-blog · an hour ago
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If you’re a dedicated athlete, a weekend warrior, or someone who is simply trying to become more active, your protein intake plays a key role in your physical performance.
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Nightside radio could help reveal exoplanet details We can't detect them yet, but radio signals from distant solar systems could provide valuable information about the characteristics of their planets. A paper by Rice University scientists describes a way to better determine which exoplanets are most likely to produce detectable signals based on magnetosphere activity on exoplanets' previously discounted nightsides. The study by Rice alumnus Anthony Sciola, who earned his Ph.D. this spring and was mentored by co-author and space plasma physicist Frank Toffoletto, shows that while radio emissions from the daysides of exoplanets appear to max out during high solar activity, those that emerge from the nightside are likely to add significantly to the signal. This interests the exoplanet community because the strength of a given planet's magnetosphere indicates how well it would be protected from the solar wind that radiates from its star, the same way Earth's magnetic field protects us. Planets that orbit within a star's Goldilocks zone, where conditions may otherwise give rise to life, could be deemed uninhabitable without evidence of a strong enough magnetosphere. Magnetic field strength data would also help to model planetary interiors and understand how planets form, Sciola said. The study appears in The Astrophysical Journal. Earth's magnetosphere isn't exactly a sphere; it's a comet-shaped set of field lines that compress against the planet's day side and tail off into space on the night side, leaving eddies in their wake, especially during solar events like coronal mass ejections. The magnetosphere around every planet emits what we interpret as radio waves, and the closer to the sun a planet orbits, the stronger the emissions. Astrophysicists have a pretty good understanding of our own system's planetary magnetospheres based on the Radiometric Bode's Law, an analytical tool used to establish a linear relationship between the solar wind and radio emissions from the planets in its path. In recent years, researchers have attempted to apply the law to exoplanetary systems with limited success. "The community has used these rule-of-thumb empirical models based on what we know about the solar system, but it's kind of averaged and smoothed out," Toffoletto said. "A dynamic model that includes all this spiky behavior could imply the signal is actually much larger than these old models suggest. Anthony is taking this and pushing it to its limits to understand how signals from exoplanets could be detected." Sciola said the current analytic model relies primarily on emissions expected to emerge from an exoplanet's polar region, what we see on Earth as an aurora. The new study appends a numerical model to those that estimate polar region emissions to provide a more complete picture of emissions around an entire exoplanet. "We're adding in features that only show up in lower regions during really high solar activity," he said. It turns out, he said, that nightside emissions don't necessarily come from one large spot, like auroras around the north pole, but from various parts of the magnetosphere. In the presence of strong solar activity, the sum of these nightside spots could raise the planet's total emissions by at least an order of magnitude. "They're very small-scale and occur sporadically, but when you sum them all up, they can have a great effect," said Sciola, who is continuing the work at Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory. "You need a numerical model to resolve those events. For this study, Sciola used the Multiscale Atmosphere Geospace Environment (MAGE) developed by the Center for Geospace Storms (CGS) based at the Applied Physics Laboratory in collaboration which the Rice space plasma physics group. "We're essentially confirming the analytic model for more extreme exoplanet simulations, but adding extra detail," he said. "The takeaway is that we're bringing further attention to the current model's limiting factors but saying that under certain situations, you can get more emissions than that limiting factor suggests." He noted the new model works best on exoplanetary systems. "You need to be really far away to see the effect," he said. It's hard to tell what's going on at the global scale on Earth; it's like trying to watch a movie by sitting right next to the screen. You're only getting a little patch of it." Also, radio signals from an Earth-like exoplanet may never be detectable from Earth's surface, Sciola said. "Earth's ionosphere blocks them," he said. "That means we can't even see Earth's own radio emission from the ground, even though it's so close." Detection of signals from exoplanets will require either a complex of satellites or an installation on the far side of the moon. "That would be a nice, quiet place to make an array that won't be limited by Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere," Sciola said. He said the observer's position in relation to the exoplanet is also important. "The emission is 'beamed,'" Sciola said. "It's like a lighthouse: You can see the light if you are in line with the beam, but not if you are directly above the lighthouse. So having a better understanding of the expected angle of the signal will help observers determine if they are in line to observe it for a particular exoplanet." IMAGE....Rice University scientists have enhanced models that could detect magnetosphere activity on exoplanets. The models add data from nightside activity that could increase signals by at least an order of magnitude. In this illustration, the planet's star is at top left, and the rainbow patches are the radio emission intensities, most coming from the nightside. The white lines are magnetic field lines. CREDIT Anthony Sciola/Rice University
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dichoticwomanism · an hour ago
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Awareness to specialized <b>therapy</b> gains traction
JONESBORO — Starla Denton, owner of Pelvic Floor and Core Physical Therapy, said it's nice to finally see some interest in an often ignored group of ... from Google Alert - Physical Therapist https://ift.tt/3xGz4tt
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in-superbloom · an hour ago
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just need to yell for a sec about my cousin bc goddamn i love that kid so much 🥺 i used to joke all the time that i wanted her to be like me (i was 8 when she was born) and now she's 13 and she's like, my perfect copy personality wise. and i get so emotional thinking about this, it's ridiculous lmao i just think that i have a much stronger 'auntie nature' rather than a 'motherly nature' so this feeling of watching my kids (cousins and niece and soon my niece/nephew that's on the way) growing up really hits me hard.
and i get so !!!!! bc she really likes pretty much everything i used to like at her age, even tho she's exposed to so many different things now. the second she settled down when she arrived yesterday, we were watching a lindsay lohan movie from 2002, then today she freaked tf out bc she saw that jonas the series is on disney+ so now we're binge watching that and my inner 11-years-old is currently melting. we were also watching star wars today and belting one direction together and like !!!!! she might as well have come out of my womb 😭🥺
i also caught her on wattpad today lmao i swear the only thing from my childhood/teen years i introduced her to was high school musical 🤭 i don't wanna know what she's reading about tho 🤣
anyways, she has my whole heart and i just needed to say this <3
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ellagracia11 · an hour ago
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Flat feet are caused by many different factors, including genetics, age, and weight. Having flat feet can create extremely painful issues that make it hard for you to play the sports you love, or just simply navigate on a daily basis.
Thankfully, if you have flat feet, a physical therapist can treat and suggest simple lifestyle changes such as targeted stretches and special exercises to lengthen and strengthen muscles. They can also suggest certain types of shoes and insoles that can lift your arch, improve your posture, and strengthen your core.
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New Ocean Data Flowing In After six months of check-out and calibration in orbit, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich mission will make its first two data streams available to the public on June 22, 2021. Launched in November 2020, the satellite is a U.S.–European collaboration to measure sea surface height and other ocean surface features such as wind speed and wave height. One of the sea surface height data streams that will be released is accurate to within 5.8 centimeters (2.3 inches) and will be available within hours of acquisition by Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich. A second stream of data, accurate to within 3.5 centimeters (1.4 inches), will be released about two days after it is collected. The two different products are meant to balance the need for timeliness in tasks like weather forecasting and the need for more precision in studying longer trends. Other datasets—accurate to about 2.9 centimeters (1.2 inches)—are slated for distribution later in 2021; these are intended for research activities in climate science and global mean sea level rise. The map above shows sea surface height anomalies (3.5 centimeter accuracy) as measured by the satellite’s radar altimeter between June 5-15, 2021. Red-orange areas show regions where sea level was higher than normal, and blue areas show regions where it was lower than normal. Named after former NASA Earth Science Division director Michael Freilich, the satellite collects measurements over about 90 percent of the world’s oceans. It is one of two satellites in the Copernicus Sentinel-6/Jason-CS (Continuity of Service) mission. The second satellite, Sentinel-6B, is slated for launch in 2025. Together, they are the latest in a series of spacecraft that have been gathering precise ocean height measurements for nearly 30 years. Shortly after launch, Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich moved into a position trailing the Jason-3 sea level reference satellite by 30 seconds in orbit. Scientists and engineers have since been cross-calibrating the data collected by both satellites to ensure the continuity of measurements between them. “It is a relief knowing that the satellite is working and that the data look good,” said Josh Willis, project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “Several months from now, Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will take over for its predecessor, Jason-3, and this data release is the first step in that process.” “We have been flying Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich on the same orbit as Jason-3 for the past six months so that the satellites have the same view of the ocean,” said Julia Figa Saldana, ocean altimetry program manager at the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites of (EUMETSAT). “Experts from around the world have collaborated intensively over the past six months, despite the workplace constraints caused by the coronavirus pandemic, to cross-calibrate their data to ensure accuracy.” Scientists can use sea surface height data to gauge how fast sea levels are rising around the world. Such measurements can also help forecasters predict things like ocean currents and potential hurricane strength. More than 90 percent of the heat trapped in the Earth system due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases is absorbed by the ocean, and this heat causes seawater to expand. The expansion of seawater accounts for about one third of modern-day sea level rise, while meltwater from glaciers and ice sheets accounts for the rest. The rate at which the oceans are rising has accelerated over the past two decades, and researchers expect it to speed up more in the coming years. NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021) processed by the European Space Agency. and partners at NASA/JPL-Caltech. Story by Jane J. Lee/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with Mike Carlowicz.
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New U.S.-European Satellite Tracking Sea Level Rise The joint U.S.-European Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is the next in a line of Earth-observing satellites that will collect the most accurate data yet on sea level and how it changes over time. With millimeter-scale precision, data from this mission will allow scientists to precisely measure sea surface height and gauge how quickly our oceans are rising. The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite is part of the Sentinel-6/Jason-CS mission, a collaboration among NASA, ESA, EUMETSAT, and NOAA. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California no earlier than Nov. 10, 2020. Credit: NASA-JPL/Caltech/NOAA
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dichoticwomanism · 2 hours ago
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Online initiative helps foster students&#39; university dreams
But becoming a professional physical therapist requires coursework at an accredited university or vocational program, and Tsuda did not have any ... from Google Alert - Physical Therapist https://ift.tt/35KFbB1
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bihetzhouzishu · 2 hours ago
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i promise i am going to finish the shows i stopped watching as soon as i make a carrd or smth or a page organizing everything i’m watching/reading etc
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