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#visitor center
callmeloublog · 8 days ago
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Is That Lizard Smiling?
It was a warm summer afternoon, so I was enjoying the air conditioning. July in Kansas can normally get well above 100F in the afternoon. This is when the lake is a prime destination for folks wanting to camp, swim, or boat in Kansas. We don’t have mountains or forrests, but we do have many lakes. I was hanging out in the visitors center which had a large room with a rather boring collection of…
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moonlight87world · 8 days ago
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Visitor Center - A Mallsoft / Vaporwave / Ambient Electronic Mix
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perikali · 3 months ago
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“ Located on the crest of a wooded rise, framing a view towards the meadow below, the visitor center for Better Place Forests in Point Arena, California marks the threshold of the visitors’ journey into the forest’s memorial groves. Better Places Forests offers a sustainable alternative to cemeteries. Within these protected forests, families choose trees to mark the place where they’ll spread their loved ones’ ashes over generations. The concept has simple poetry—merging ritual, memorial, and forest conservation—yet its realization involved a large team of design and technical specialists, led by Fletcher Studio, landscape architects. Located on a 40-acre stretch of the Mendocino Coast, Better Place Forests’ Point Arena location establishes a framework for future sites, each with its own unique qualities.”
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rabbitcruiser · 6 months ago
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Flight 93 National Memorial, PA (No. 11)
The commission decided to select the design for the memorial through a multi-stage design competition funded by grants from the Heinz Foundations and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The competition began on September 11, 2004. With technology from Neighborhood America (now INgage Networks) supporting the competition, more than 1,000 entries were submitted online. In February 2005, five finalists were selected for further development and consideration. The 15-member final jury included family members, design and art professionals, and community and national leaders. After three days of review and debate, they announced the winner on September 7, 2005: Crescent of Embrace by a design team led by Paul and Milena Murdoch of Los Angeles.
The design featured a "Tower of Voices," containing 40 wind chimes — one for each passenger and crew member who died. A crescent would have been formed by a circular pathway lined with red maple trees that follows the natural bowl shape of the land. Forty groves of red and sugar maples and eastern white oak trees were to be planted behind the crescent. A black slate wall would mark the edge of the crash site, where the victims are buried.
Bloggers and religious groups criticized the new design. Jury member Tom Burnett Sr., whose son was killed in the crash, said he made an impassioned speech to his fellow jurors about what he felt the crescent represented. "I explained this goes back centuries as an old-time Islamic symbol. ... I told them we'd be a laughing stock if we did this," Burnett said. Representative Tom Tancredo of Colorado has opposed the design's shape "because of the crescent's prominent use as a symbol in Islam." Mike Rosen of the Rocky Mountain News wrote: "On the anniversaries of 9/11, it's not hard to visualize al-Qaeda celebrating the crescent of maple trees, turning red in the fall, "embracing" the Flight 93 crash site. To them, it would be a memorial to their fallen martyrs. Why invite that? Just come up with a different design that eliminates the double meaning and the dispute." The architect asserted that the alignment was coincidental and that there was no intent to refer to Muslim symbols. Several victims' families agreed that there was no intent to refer to Muslim symbols. Others criticized the design as too non-representational. James Lileks, a journalist and architectural commentator, wrote:
We don't need giant statues of the guys ramming the drink cart into the door. But pedantic though such a monument might be, future generations would infer the plot. All you get from a Crescent of Embrace is a sorrowful sigh of all-encompassing grief and absolution, as if the lives of all who died on that spot were equal in tragedy. They were not."
Source: Wikipedia
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therealuniverse · 8 months ago
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Heading to visit some sites doesn't seem like a particularly good idea these days, so here's a trip taken prior to the pandemic to the visitor center at Kennedy Space Center, featuring the Shuttle Atlantis. The view looking up at the external tank and SRB assembly is amazing!
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floridaboiler · a year ago
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This is a picture of an asteroid crater in Arizona - Look how close it came to hitting the visitors centre!
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man-and-atom · a year ago
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It’s not entirely clear why this German nuclear power station translated its visitor guide into English, but the resulting booklet is an excellent brief introduction to light-water reactors.
The Philippsburg plant, on the Rhine river, started with an 890 MW boiling-water reactor, and a 1400 MW pressurized-water reactor was added later. The former was shut down in 2011, after generating 187.5 terawatt-hours since it was first connected to the grid in 1979. The latter is still operating, for now, having generated 347 TWh from 1984 to the end of 2018.
We do not know whether the Visitor Center is still open, but we mean to find out.
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man-and-atom · a year ago
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Fort St Vrain was perhaps the most technically-advanced nuclear power plant yet constructed in the United States, using a high-temperature reactor with helium coolant and an all-ceramic core. As the first utility-scale HTR, it suffered teething troubles, as well as problems with the approach adopted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was oriented towards light-water reactors. The problem which left it effectively orphaned, however, was that exploitation of the uranium-thorium fuel cycle required large investments in reprocessing plant. Nobody was willing to invest the money for those facilities without a substantial number of plants to spread the cost over, but nobody was willing to invest the money for the plants without the fuel facilities assured. Add to that changing US government policy, and the HTR was dead on arrival. Fort St Vrain remains the only utility nuclear station to have operated in the Mountain West, where electricity otherwise comes primarily from coal, gas, and hydro.
This booklet is a good brief introduction to nuclear energy for the layman, and an excellent preview of the exhibits at the Information Center. We wish we knew what had happened to all the models, artwork, and other materials from this and other defunct nuclear-station visitor centers!
As a matter of historical interest, the title of the booklet was also used as a slogan for the Oklahoma Semi-Centennial celebrations of 1957.
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mountrainiernps · a year ago
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Parks are full of stories and information. There are so many tales and research, you can spend months reading and studying and still not know it all. But ask an interpretive ranger and they'll say that there is one good place to start: site bulletins.
Stop by the Longmire Museum, a visitor center, or the ranger booth at the Paradise Inn and ask for information on your favorite topic. Your friendly park ranger can draw on a variety of site bulletins on many different topics to answer your questions and start many a story.
What has been your favorite site bulletin from Mount Rainier? Was it on geology, backpacking, or a bird checklist perhaps? ~ams
NPS Photo (top). Park rangers working at the front desk of the Jackson Visitor Center at Paradise. Photo (bottom). Four pieces of white paper with black text on the counter of the Longmire Museum.  August, 2019.
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maikai-diablo · 2 years ago
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Move over Barney, there’s a new deputy in town. 😜 Thanks for stopping by the visitor center this morning @scotteastwood! We enjoyed your visit!
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aguamalamedusin-blog · 2 years ago
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Tweed's visitor center batch 5
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aguamalamedusin-blog · 2 years ago
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Twee visitor center batch 4
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aguamalamedusin-blog · 2 years ago
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Batch 3
Unfortunately we missed the flower harvest. :(
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aguamalamedusin-blog · 2 years ago
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Second batch
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aguamalamedusin-blog · 2 years ago
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First batch of pics from Tweed's visitor center in Smith Falls, ON
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