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#the ministry for the future
churchtech · 22 hours ago
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Leading youth and children's ministry into a bright future
Leading youth and children’s ministry into a bright future
1 June 2021 Leading youth and children’s ministry into a bright future Tim Alford, National Director of Limitless – the national youth and children’s ministry of Elim, publishes a practical leadership book to equip leaders to lead well. Youth and children’s ministry is impacted by many things – from training and resources to demographic. But ultimately it is leadership skills that determine…
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alanshemper · 3 days ago
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I finished Ministry of the Future a little less than a month ago. I generally liked it and have recommended it to friends. That said, this review, which is critical of the book, brings up some really good points.
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expectsomuch · 5 days ago
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Book Review: Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson
What a book! Ought to be mandatory reading for just about everybody. A blueprint for what we can do to save the planet, and how we might not totally fuck it up, and only just barely, if we get a lot of things right (and get very lucky).
Equal parts inspirational and devastating, I constantly wanted top grab friends,, colleagues, and world leaders by the collar and shout “THIS IS THE FUTURE YOU’RE ASKING FOR” as I read through.
Told in a combination of straightforward narratives and memoirs from various characters from a future that is just around the corner, Robinson paints a sobering but overall hopeful picture about what must be done to save the planet, and how even in the best of circumstances, with luck we can’t rely on, we will still face unimaginable losses and trials ahead of us for generations to come.
Robinson has a knack from architecting novels as theses for how the world ought to be, and this is his most ambitious and polemic work yet.
As I was reading it, I desperately wanted it to be the future history it so gracefully foretells, and it is rendered so well that it seems like it might even be a found artifact from the future, a convincingly rendered document of how the world came to start fixing itself.
It is of course hopelessly optimistic - the problems we have to solve are so immense, and the cultural barriers so thorny, that the hopeful the future world the Robinson envisions feels sadly, tragically, hopelessly naive.
But it oughtn’t be. This should be the baseline of what we can even barely accepts - the truth is that we have the potential to do so much better. Hopefully this book can wake more of us up to that, and give those of us who are desperate for a roadmap that truly gets us from here to there a little closer to finding our way forward.
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anythingisabookmark · 10 days ago
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The Ministry for the Future - Kim Stanley Robinson
This recommendation has fundamentally changed the trajectory of my year. And possibly the next decade for me. I knew about the challenge facing us with climate change, I was well aware and delved into the movement in 2008 after Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth came out. Back then, I was actually a youth. One of the generations that would be directly affected by the impending climate disaster. I was energised and optimistic, but with only dead ends at a higher policy level, my steam soon ran out.
I avoided the resurgence in eco activism/awareness in the last few years. I saw headlines counselling the new ‘eco-anxiety’ that has come about from leaning too far into the science and politics of Climate Change. Why would I give myself more anxiety about something that I can’t fundamentally change, as an individual or even through an activist group? Isn’t that what the world doesn’t need - another privileged white woman buying activewear from recycled plastics and blaring on about beeswax wraps?
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In this frame of mind, and also in an anti-sci-fi context, I came to The Ministry for the Future. The first chapter about the Indian Heatwave seemed like an interesting and plausible inclusion. It’s likely that the hottest places will keep getting hotter. These are countries closest to the equator. These are largely developing nations of black and brown people. Then the ‘Ministry for the Future’ is set out by the 2025 Paris Accord. Yes, also something that would come out of the UN. Unlikely to drive real change. Something else that Greta Thunberg to scold as well intentioned yet lacking real change.
The 7 or 9 (I returned the library book and can’t remember specifics now) areas within the department were fascinating. Each represented a key threat to the climate, and Robinson took us on a journey to explore the solutions that were mostly all existing ideas that were implemented as intended. I didn’t think glaciology would interest me as much as it did when reading those passages. The bit that was the turning point for me (and it seemed like the future world) was Saudi Arabia’s coup. (Spoiler alert coming). It seems like such a simple chain of events…. Saudi Arabia as a nation fails. New government keeps oil in the ground. Becomes rich from carbon coins. Oil prices skyrocket worldwide. Renewables and EVs suddenly become ridiculously affordable. Power grids worldwide are transformed.
To get the world’s grids to renewables that quickly is a huge idea. It could really transform the future of the planet. Don’t ask me how much, I’m not a scientist, but if anything these ideas and happenings in the projected future of the book make it clear that real change comes at a policy level. We need our lawmakers to start listening and doing better.
I didn’t really care for Mary and Vadim’s story arcs at all. I wasn’t in the book for great literary characters and didn’t want half baked ones. Mary lacked depth, and so did everyone around her.
I’ve recommended this book to everyone that will listen since. I’ve also listened to a few podcasts with Robinson, and added his other books to my reading list (though I won’t read too quickly, as I don’t want to get KSR-fatigue!). I also added a slew of other climate and environment related books to my list, as now it’s important to me, I need to read up and across the topic to understand as much as I can. I don’t consider myself an environmentalist, but it’s becoming clear that issues are intersectional. Helping the environment helps everyone.
Lateral reads and viewing
Project Drawdown explains how the solutions work in very accessible terms, with details available for the nerds.
How To Save a Planet podcast from Gimlet Media is one that I've heard about for awhile but never tried. Now I'm hooked. Alex Blumberg and Ayana Johnson are fantastic hosts and do a really good job.
Dense Discovery is a weekly newsletter that I've been subscribed to for some time that has great sustainability info.
Project Wren allows you to calculate your carbon footprint and offset in one go or in a monthly subscription. I'm now aware that there are many services that offer this, this is just one.
Anything David Attenborough is a good companion piece when learning about the environment.
Seaspiracy on Netflix has a bit of a vegan propaganda vibe to it, but worthwhile and makes me reflect on my power as a consumer to purchase sustainable (?) fish.
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bookcoversonly · a month ago
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Title: The Ministry for the Future | Author: Kim Stanley Robinson | Publisher: Orbit (2020)
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jayvoicetrg · a month ago
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Dare Adeboye Was A Symbol Of Future Christian Ministry ―Osinbajo
Dare Adeboye Was A Symbol Of Future Christian Ministry ―Osinbajo
  Dare Adeboye Share Vice President Yemi Osinbajo has described Pastor Dare Adeboye, the late son of the General Overseer of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), Pastor Enoch Adeboye, as a symbol of future Christian ministry in the country. Osinbajo stated this on Monday at the Service of Songs and Tribute in honour of the deceased at the RCCG House of Favour, Redemption Camp, along…
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valencing · a month ago
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“‘If things feel’ like this or that: these feelings too are linked to periodization, because our feelings are not just biological but also social and cultural and therefore historical. Raymond Williams called this cultural shaping a “structure of feeling,” and this is a very useful concept for trying to comprehend differences in cultures through time. Of course as mammals we feel emotions that are basic and constant: fear, anger, hope, love. But we comprehend these biological emotions by way of language, thereby organizing them into systems of emotions that are different in different cultures and over time. Thus for instance, famously, romantic love means different things in different cultures at different times; consider Ancient Greece, China, medieval Europe, anywhere. 
“So how you feel about your time is partly or even largely a result of that time’s structure of feeling. When time passes and that structure changes, how you feel will also change––both in your body and in how you understand it as a meaning. Say the order of your time feels unjust and unsustainable and yet massively entrenched, but also falling apart before your eyes. The obvious contradictions in this list might yet still describe the feeling of your time quite accurately, if we are not mistaken. Or put it this way; it feels that way to us. But a little contemplation of history will reveal that this feeling too will not last for long. Unless of course the feeling of things falling apart is itself massively entrenched, to the point of being the eternal or eternally recurrent individual human’s reaction to history. Which may just mean the reinscription of the biological onto the historical, for we are all definitely always falling apart, and not massively entrenched in anything at all.”
-Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future
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comfortcomfortdeercat · 3 months ago
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To be clear, concluding in brief: there is enough for all. So there should be no more people living in poverty. And there should be no more billionaires. Enough should be a human right, a floor below which no one can fall; also a ceiling above which no one can rise. Enough is a good as a feast—or better.
Arranging this situation is left as an exercise for the reader.
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future
Thanks for the help, Kim.
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comfortcomfortdeercat · 3 months ago
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For a while, therefore, it looked like the great heat wave would be like mass shootings in the United States-mourned by all, deplored by all, and then immediately forgotten or superseded by the next one, until they came in a daily drumbeat and became the new normal. It looked quite possible that the same thing would happen with this event, the worst week in human history. How long would that stay true, about being the worst week? And what could anyone do about it? Easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism: the old saying had grown teeth and was taking on a literal, vicious accuracy.
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future
Well this sure fucked me up.
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comfortcomfortdeercat · 3 months ago
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I love Kim Stanley Robinson, but every time I read something from him, I'm always just sitting in anticipation of some weird sex thing showing up on the page.
It's just... he's weird about how he presents sexuality, and him being a 68 year old white cishet man makes it just... squick
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english-ness · 3 months ago
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2021 Reading Challenge - March week One What is your favorite quote from the book you are currently reading so far?
To be clear, concluding in brief: there is enough for all. So there should be no more people living in poverty. And there should be no more billionaires. Enough should be a human right, a floor below which no one can fall; also a ceiling above which no one can rise. Enough is as good as a feast — or better. Arranging this situation is left as an exercise for the reader. Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future
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