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#susanna kearsley
myhikari21things · 7 days ago
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Reading My Entire Library Week 38 (April 1, 2021-April 7, 2021)
American Gods-2001 Neil Gaiman
Dreamcatcher-2001 Stephen King
Season of Storms-2001 Susanna Kearsley
Summer Island-2001 Kristin Hannah
Baron: The Cat Returns-2002 Aoi Hiiragi
Coraline-2002 Neil Gaiman
Distant Shores-2002 Kristin Hannah
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reynoldsreads · 8 days ago
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The Rose Garden - Susanna Kearsley
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There’s just something about time travel romances...
Eva Ward returns to her childhood home in Cornwall to scatter her sister's ashes, reconnect with old friends, and figure out the next step for her life. But her peaceful summer takes a strange turn when she begins taking unexpected trips to the past. In the early 1700s she meets Daniel Butler, a gentleman smuggler who believes her story and takes her under his wing ... and may just steal her heart if she's not careful.
I got so engrossed in this story! Highly romantic, with a touch of mystery and adventure as Eva tries to learn more about the smugglers in her own time and becomes involved in their operations in the past. The title is a bit of a misnomer, though, because the rose garden only exists in the present and doesn't play a very significant role — it's only mentioned a few times. Other than that, my only complaint is that I wish the story was longer!
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myhikari21things · 10 days ago
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Reading My Entire Library
Season of Storms by Susanna Kearsley (2001)
April 3, 2021-April 4, 2021
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thezeroquotes · 6 months ago
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It's too easy, you see, to get trapped in the past. The past is very seductive. People always talk about the mists of time, you know, but really it's the present that's in a mist, uncertain. The past is quite clear, and warm, and comforting. That's why people often get stuck there.
— Susanna Kearsley
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bookrecommendsandstuff · 9 months ago
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A mystery trapped in time In 1921, infamous Italian poet Galeazzo D'Ascanio wrote his last and greatest play, inspired by his muse and mistress, actress Celia Sands. On the eve of opening night, Celia vanished, and the play was never performed. Now, two generations later, Alessandro D'Ascanio plans to stage his grandfather's masterpiece and has offered the lead to a promising young English actress, also named Celia Sands-at the whim of her actress mother, or so she has always thought. When Celia arrives at D'Ascanio's magnificent, isolated Italian villa, she is drawn to the mystery of her namesake's disappearance-and to the compelling, enigmatic Alessandro. But the closer Celia gets to learning the first Celia's fate, the more she is drawn into a web of murder, passion, and the obsession of genius. Though she knows she should let go of the past, in the dark, in her dreams, it comes back...
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flyicarus · 10 months ago
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The Deadly Hours - REVIEW
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★★★★★
Note: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.
A stellar line-up of historical mystery novelists weaves the tale of a priceless and cursed gold watch as it passes through time wreaking havoc from one owner to another. The characters are irrevocably linked by fate, each playing a key role in breaking the curse and destroying the watch once and for all.
From 1733 Italy to Edinburgh in 1831 to a series of chilling murders in 1870 London, and a lethal game of revenge decades later, the watch touches lives with misfortune, until it comes into the reach of one young woman who might be able to stop it for good.
I have been waiting for this book for a couple of years, ever since it was first announced by the authors. I follow Anna Lee Huber, Susanna Kearsley, and C.S. Harris on social media, and knowing they were working on something together, especially something as fun as a cursed pocket watch, made me incredibly eager to read the finished product. I have read books by Huber, Kearsley, and Harris, as well as Christine Trent, and the novellas in The Deadly Hours showcase their talents well, making it a treat for any fan of historical fiction.
In all honesty, I loved all of the stories, and found it hard to put the book down, although I forced myself to make it last longer and so I could take the stories in further.
In Kearsley’s story, I loved seeing Hugh and Mary again, especially once they had settled in to their relationship a bit more, and the supporting cast of characters was just as interesting and colorful. It was a great introduction to La Sirene. In Huber’s story, again so delightful to spend time with loved characters Keira and Gage, and see Bonnie Brock in a different light. Trent’s story was more new to me in a sense, as I haven’t (yet) read any of her Lady of Ashes mysteries, the protagonist of which was the focus of her novella. However, it was still greatly enjoyable, and made me put her other series on my TBR list. Harris’s story was fun too, and I liked that she did something more modern than her Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries, and that it dealt with perhaps more darker themes than the other authors.
Something I really enjoyed about this collection was the fact that each story built upon the others, and that they were connected not just by La Sirene but also by different characters within the stories as well. It really made The Deadly Hours cohesive, and showed the sheer talent of the authors involved. So often with anthologies the stories aren’t all that connected at all, sharing a theme and little else, but that is not the case here. Despite the death and blood and tragedy surrounding La Sirene, and the mysteries each story’s protagonists had to wade through, there was always an ending with a hopeful note, and positive changes made as a result of coming into contact with the watch, showing that La Sirene can wreak blessings as well as curses.
SPOILER I will say that I do have little bones to pick with two stories in particular. In Huber's story, she mentions that a man who possessed the watch died at Culloden fields, but when it is first mentioned, it is not clear who she is speaking of, and I thought Huber had killed off Hugh, one of Kearsley's protagonists. It is later clarified by other characters that it was Douglas, Kearsley's antagonist, that had died at Culloden, but I still thought the introduction to this particular plot point could have been clearer. And in Harris's story, there is an Austrian character named Reinhardt that is tortured by MI5 agents and before the resolution of the mystery, one of the MI5 agents says he is going to pick up Reinhardt again and make him talk, leaving the scene to presumably go bring the Austrian in. This is never revisited and mentioned again, leaving the reader wondering what happened and whether Reinhardt is safe, or if he had been hurt further by MI5; I wish we had been told, and that seems pretty unresolved. However, I still have great love for this collection, and can't wait to read it again when my Kindle preorder shows up. 
The Deadly Hours is set to release on September 1, 2020.
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ladyrock18 · a year ago
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This is a neat info graphic I found for The Winter Sea, by Susanna Kearsley, it was made by Goodreads I think
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mysoul4books · a year ago
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Recsmas Day 8: A Good Romance
Bellewether by Susanna Kearsley. As a general rule I avoid books that are strictly romantic but if I have to claim a favorite romance author you bet I’m going to name Susanna Kearsley as it. I adore her historical romance books and Bellewether was wonderful. I loved how Charley, in present day, starts to uncover the story of Lydia Wild and her romance and the flashbacks to Lydia, just as things were happening in her time, between the two different time periods to build Lydia’s story up. 
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quotemadness · a year ago
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It’s too easy, you see, to get trapped in the past. The past is very seductive. People always talk about the mists of time, you know, but really it’s the present that’s in a mist, uncertain. The past is quite clear, and warm, and comforting. That’s why people often get stuck there.
Susanna Kearsley
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raeofspace · 2 years ago
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Bellewether by Susanna Kearsley 
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travelerbypage · 2 years ago
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Book Review: The Rose Garden
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Book: The Rose Garden
Author: Susanna Kearsley
Genre: Fiction/Sci-Fi/History
Summary: Eva Ward returns to the only place she truly belongs, the old house on the Cornish coast, seeking happiness in memories of childhood summers. There she finds mysterious voices and hidden pathways that sweep her not only into the past, but also into the arms of a man who is not of her time. But Eva must confront her own ghosts, as well as those of long ago. As she begins to question her place in the present, she comes to realize that she too must decide where she really belongs. -Sourcebooks, 2011.
I will say this as a warning in advance: If you've read Outlander, this is very similar to it. The summary, of course, doesn't exactly imply that, but once you read it, you start to see the similarities. Kearsley has been embraced by fans of Gabaldon, and Gabaldon herself has said that she's read every one of Kearsley's books, so if you are an Outlander fan who hasn't read any of Kearsley's books, know that the author has endorsed her.
Our heroine, Eva, travels back in time to the 1700s, a few years before the Jacobite rebellion. Unlike being in Scotland, she is in western England. She cannot control when she travels back in time and switches between the two timelines pretty steadily. Her beau is unlike Jamie in many ways as well. So, even though this book will make you think, "This looks really similar to Outlander," it's not completely like it. This book came after Outlander had already been published for years too. While fresh ideas are hard to come by, I don't think Kearsley was trying to copy anyone. I think her story is still unique in its fashion and is still worth the read.
Eva is a compelling character in a lot of ways. She's very thoughtful of others, generous, and patient. She avoids the typical time-traveling tropes by being one of the few calm and collected people to travel through time that I've read. While the situation is still certainly frightening, she doesn't force her fear on anyone else. She's very logical and a quick thinker, so she rarely is placed in a situation that could have been avoided.
The casts of both timelines are enjoyable, though I felt as if I knew the people of the present day better than the people in the past. I could picture them all very well and they felt real to me.
The scifi element of time travel is good and the "logic" of it is mostly sound. There's one little bit that's not concretely explained, only hypothesized, but that doesn't bother me.
I will, say, though, that there is a surprise twist that even I didn't see coming and I really liked it. It fit well with the story and helped to answer a lot of questions.
The writing was very good and the historical period was well-researched for the elements Kearsley was looking to use.
Did I like it as much as The Splendor Falls? Not quite, but only because I didn't identify with Eva as much as I did with Emily. We weren't in the same place.
Also, the only other thing that bugged me is that the book is called The Rose Garden, but the rose garden in the story didn't have any bearing on the plot; why call it that? I tried researching a little to see if Kearsley explained it, but I didn't see anything on her site. Oh well, a minor flaw - if you even want to call it that.
Overall, I give The Rose Garden an A.
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Please support the author by buying the book or by borrowing it from a friend or your local library.
Thanks for reading!
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diaryoftruequotes · 2 years ago
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There are times when our victories have a cost that we did not foresee, when winning brings us loss.
SUSANNA KEARSLEY
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ladyrock18 · 2 years ago
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“The world becomes a wider place, with but a little learning.”
— Susanna Kearsley, The Firebird
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ladyrock18 · 2 years ago
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Back to reading Susanna Kearsley with The Firebird;
And while I knew It was a companion novel to The Winter Sea I didn’t realize It was also connected to The Shadowy Horses?!?!?
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travelerbypage · 2 years ago
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Book Review: The Splendour Falls
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Book: The Splendour Falls
Author: Susanna Kearsley
Genre: Fiction/Mystery/Romance
Summary: Emily Braden has stopped believing in fairy tales and happy endings. When her fascinating but unreliable cousin Harry invites her on a holiday to explore the legendary town of Chinon, and promptly disappears - well, that's Harry for you. As Emily makes the acquaintance of Chinon and its people, she begins to uncover dark secrets beneath the charm. Legend has it that during a thirteenth-century siege of the castle that looms over the city, Queen Isabelle, child bride of King John, hid a "treasure of great price." And in the last days of the German occupation during World War II, another Isabelle lived at Chinon, a girl whose love for an enemy soldier went tragically awry. As the dangers of the past become disastrously real, Emily is drawn ever more deeply into a labyrinth of mystery as twisted as the streets and tunnels of the ancient town itself. -Sourcebooks, 1995
I cannot even begin to describe how much I loved this book. The summary was charming enough to enchant me, but the story itself was enthralling.
Emily decides to go with her cousin to Chinon to take a holiday from the life she's lived in lately. She arrives separately from her cousin and while she waits for him, she endears herself to the other travelers and the land she lives in. When her cousin fails to appear, she begins to think something has gone wrong and finds that the quaint village she's been in has a dark side as well.
Kearsley writes beautifully. I can't say that enough. Not only is her plot deep, intriguing, and captivating, but her characters are all wonderfully crafted. Every single one is memorable, quirky, and fun in their own ways. I yearned to be with them and at one point, I even cried over one event in the story - that's how powerful Kearsley's writing was to me.
I was sucked in from the first page to the last, and I was left yearning for more - a sequel would be wonderful, but I'm equally satisfied with what I read. I'll definitely be reading this one more than once.
The only fault that I could find with it was that she left Emily's past troubles in the dark and never fully explains them. It's a small fault though, and it doesn't bother me enough to affect my rating for the book.
I have more books by Kearsley in my list of books to read and I'm more than excited to read another one.
I give The Splendour Falls an A+.
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Please support the author by buying the book or by borrowing it from a friend or your local library. Thanks for reading!
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ladylillianrose · 2 years ago
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So I just finished all of Susanna Kearsley's available books....I need more well written historical fiction romance. I've read all of Philippa Gregory's historical fiction, Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series, and all of Lauren Willig's books.
I'm on a big UK historical fiction romance kick right now. Anyone have any recommendations?
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It’s too easy, you see, to get trapped in the past. The past is very seductive. People always talk about the mists of time, you know, but really it’s the present that’s in a mist, uncertain. The past is quite clear, and warm, and comforting. That’s why people often get stuck there.
Susanna Kearsley, Mariana
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thirteenthsister-blog · 2 years ago
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“It starts with him lost...”
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