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#spirit of st. louis
myhauntedsalem · 3 days ago
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The St. Louis Cemetery # 1
The most haunted cemetery in Louisiana is called “The St. Louis Cemetery # 1”. Annually, many exciting events take place in the New Orleans area. There is a great diversity in this area of Louisiana when it comes to culture, festivities, music, and more. In the shadows of the ever-popular French Quarter lies one of the most haunted places, as well as one of the oldest places in the area – this is the St. Louis Cemetery which is often referred to as “number one”. This is a beautiful cemetery with carefully sculpted tombs and markers of individuals who played a vital role in the history of the area. Here, you will learn about the fact that it is also the most haunted cemetery in Louisiana. The St. Louis Cemetery # 1 has so many real ghost stories and legends associated with it, that Hollywood has made good use of it by making it the setting of very popular films. You may have seen the cemetery in the movie “Easy Rider”, or even in the box office hit called “Interview with the Vampire”. While these are two of the most popular movies to feature this spooky graveyard, they are not the only cinemas to feature the location. The entire “look and feel” of this particular cemetery lay way for some of the best of the best when it comes to ghosts and legends that are frightening in nature. Not many individuals realize it, but New Orleans is an area that lies below sea level. This means, when it comes time to bury the dead, it is done by building above ground structures that house the dead bodies. These are often referred to as “tombs”. Instead of these grounds being called “cemeteries” or “graveyards”, they are often referred to as “The Cities of the Dead”. This particular “City of the Dead” hosts one of the most notorious tombs of all time – and that is of Marie Laveau. This particular woman is known as the “Grande Voodoo Queen”. Many individuals in the area believe that this particular woman’s spirit haunts the graveyard, and any and all individuals who try to disrupt her rest, or awaken.
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aryburn-trains · 16 days ago
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Amtrak #4302
flickr
Amtrak #4302 by Jim Strain Via Flickr: Train 31 the Westbound Spirit of St. Louis arriving @ St. Louis Union Station* Kodachrome my collection, Paul Kutta photographer September 1971
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photos-mdx · 16 days ago
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Ryan NYP Spirit of St. Louis
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spiralsandeyes · a month ago
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i always have been and always will be a diehard owl city bitch but god DAMN do i also love adam young’s score series from 2016. nothing fucking hits like apollo 11
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uselessvibes · a month ago
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“I have friends who understand me, their names are Spider, Beetle, Bee.”
Boys will be bugs by: Cavetown
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furryalligator · a month ago
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ESPAÑA 1930 584 Sello ** Pro Union Iberoamericana Sevilla Correo Aereo Argentina Teodoro Fels 1ª http://stamps.sellosmundo.com/Europe/Spain/stamp_143788.htm
from https://www.stamp-collecting-world.com/spanishstamps_1920a.html The nine airmail commemorative airmail stamps shown above (Sc. #C41-C42) were issued on October 10, 1930 to celebrate the Iberia-America Union Exhibition, held in Seville.
The eight common designs, as they appear in the set, are as follows.
05 C. - Santos-Dumont and his airplane. 10 C. - Teodoro Fels and his airplane. 25 C. - Dagoberto Godoy and his flight over the Andes. 50 C. - Sacadura Cabral, Gago Coutinho, and their airplane. 50 C. - Sidar of Mexico and a map of South America. 01 P. (Carmine Lake) - Ignacio Jiménez and Francisco Iglesias. 01 P. (Brown Violet) - Ignacio Jiménez and Francisco Iglesias. 01 P. (Deep Green) - Charles A. Lindberg, Statue of Liberty, the Spirit of St. Louis, and a cat. 04 P. - Santa Maria, plane, and Torre del Oro in Seville.
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craiglotter · 2 months ago
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USA 2019 - 14 Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC (2019-10-27)
USA 2019 – 14 Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC (2019-10-27)
There’s nothing more disappointing than finding your most eagerly anticipated tourist sight or experience covered in scaffolding and men at work signs. This then is exactly what awaited me as I, who suffers from a life long love and admiration for all things aeronautical, shuffled across the National Mall to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, having just spent the last couple of hours…
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thepurpletape · 3 months ago
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Spirits of St. Louis
The Spirits of St. Louis were only around for two seasons, but they remain one of the most recognizable ABA teams to this day. From 1974 to 1976 they were equal parts electric and dysfunctional, and wore bright orange and white uniforms the entire time.
My concept takes the branding in a more vintage direction, replacing the bright orange with a rust orange, and adding black and metallic gold. The primary logo is composed of a basketball with The Arch and the team name aligned to form an airplane. The secondary logo also features the basketball and arch, but with ST.L replacing the plane and also breaks down into an icon. The old logo was modernized an an alternate option while an S OF ST.L mark offers a typographic logo option to the set. The custom typeface uses a horizontal slab serif with a consistent stroke weight, while the numbers are more vertical to better fit the spaces on an NBA jersey.
The uniforms feature a five-stripe trim that offers a barnstorming flair, while a golden arch sits across the chest just above the wordmark.  The inside of the collar proudly states IN SPIRIT, IN PERPETUITY as a reference to the fact that the Spirits ownership group still receives 1/7 of the revenue of the four teams that survived the NBA-ABA merger: the Nets, Nuggets, Pacers, and Spurs. The Association jersey is white with rust orange type, while the Icon is rust orange with with white, and the alternate is black with orange type. The Pride uniforms feature a cream-colored base with rust accents and black trim, and the retro-inspired logo on the chest.
The court features a relatively classic motif, but with the Spirit of St. Louis ghosted into the hardwood on each end.
unofficialathletic.com
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Winging It: Quetzalcoatlus and the History of Aviation
When I see Quetzalcoatlus northropi soaring above the Cretaceous in Dinosaurs in Their Time, I’m often reminded of the Spirit of St. Louis suspended aloft at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. It might sound strange that a pterosaur from 70 million years ago would bring to mind an icon of twentieth century flight, but Q. northropi is a perfect starting point for exploring modern aviation history and the interconnections between nature and aeronautical engineering.
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The Spirit of St. Louis in the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.
When I was first introduced to Q. northropi, I knew it was named after the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl, but I assumed the northropi part came from the name of the paleontologist who discovered the great pterosaur’s remains. I soon found to my surprise that the specific name northropi was bestowed in honor of Jack Northrop, the aeronautical engineer who experimented with flying wing aircraft designs in the 1940s. When the pterosaur was discovered in Big Bend National Park in the early 1970s by graduate student Douglas A. Lawson from the University of Texas at Austin, Lawson and his advisor were struck by its size (adults could grow as large as a giraffe), wingspan (up to 36 feet), and its lack of a tail. The last of these three features made Northrop a natural namesake for the species. As the fantastic news of Quetzalcoatlus spread in 1975, the journal Science unveiled one of its most memorable cover pages: depicted on the cover of its mid-March issue to dramatic effect is a Northrop flying wing aircraft (think the grandfather of the Stealth bomber), Quetzalcoatlus, a Pteranodon (with a puny wingspan of only 18 feet), and a condor (looking like a harmless sparrow in comparison). From the moment of its discovery in Far West Texas, Quetzalcoatlus northropi captured the imagination of both the paleontological and aviation communities and does so to this day.
The tailless design of Northrop’s flying wing allowed for better fuel efficiency and increased aerodynamics compared to traditional airplane designs. Debate, however, has raged over whether or not Quetzalcoatlus’s anatomy allowed the creature its own advantage in flight...or if it could fly at all. The jury is still out on the particulars of Q. northropi’s flying ability. Recent theorizing, from the mind of paleontologist Michael Habib, has the pterosaur capable of perhaps short flights powered by quadrupedal take-off as opposed to bipedal take-off, the method used by birds. Regardless of the debate, Q. northropi has itself inspired experimentation in drone technology. In 1985, at the behest of the Smithsonian, engineer Paul MacCready and a team of fellow scientists built and tested an orthocopter modeled after Quetzalcoalus with a modified wingspan of 18 feet. While the project was not without its technical hiccups, the team successfully test-flew their human-constructed pterosaur over Death Valley that year. This drone, called QN, is now housed at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum and remains an ambitious and fascinating example of how scientists attempt to fathom the biomechanics of extinct species. With this in mind, maybe it isn’t so strange that I’ve imagined Quetzalcoatlus and the Spirit of St. Louis in the same thought after all.
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Comparison of Q. northropi with a similar plane to the Spirit of St. Louis, the Cessna 172
While Q. northropi’s flying skills remain ambiguous, its namesake’s design is indeed found directly in nature. Northrop’s flying wing shares its form and function with the seeds of the Javanese flying cucumber (Alsomitra macrocarpa), a fruit-bearing vine found in Southeast Asia. When its fruit, football-sized gourds, have ripened they release their seeds from high in the canopy of the rainforest. These seeds, light-weight, papery in texture, and shaped like flying wings glide to the ground sometimes several hundred meters away using autogyration to guide and slow their descent; this is the same phenomenon, for example, that guides maple trees’ “whirligig” seeds, known scientifically as samaras, to the ground. Nature is full of designs and forms that aeronautical engineers mine for the advancement of flight technology. Paul MacCready, when lecturing before an esteemed audience at MIT, once called dragonflies, hummingbirds, and hawk moths “nature’s helicopters.” Happily, each of those animals will be common in Southwestern Pennsylvania when spring and summer finally return. So, whether you’re marveling at Quetzalcoatlus northropi any time of year at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History or taking a leisurely walk at your local park, you’ll be able to ponder with renewed attention the interconnections between the natural world and the science of aviation.
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Young maple tree samaras, still attached to their branches.
Nicholas Sauer is a Gallery Experience Presenter in CMNH’s Life Long Learning Department. Museum staff, volunteers, and interns are encouraged to blog about their unique experiences and knowledge gained from working at the museum.
Works Cited
Bryner, Jeanna. “How Huge Flying Reptiles Got Airborne.” Livescience.com. 7 Jan. 2009. <https://www.livescience.com/3190-huge-flying-reptiles-airborne.html>.
Carlson, Mark. “Northrop’s Radical Flying Wing Bomber of the 1940s.” July 2020. <https://www.historynet.com/northrops-radical-flying-wing-bomber-of-the-1940s.htm>.
MacCready, Paul and John Langford. “Human-Powered Flight: Potentials.” MIT Gardner Lecture, 27 April 1998. MIT Video Productions. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8C8-BB_7nw>.
Miller, David. “It’s A Bird; It’s a Plane; It’s a...Cucumber?” Boston University. 25 Nov. 2012. <http://blogs.bu.edu/bioaerial2012/2012/11/25/the-stabilizing-characteristics-of-alsomitra-macrocarpa/>.
“Texas Pterosaur Flies into Spotlight this National Fossil Day.” The University of Texas at Austin, Jackson School of Geosciences. 17 Oct. 2018. <https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/2018/10/texas-pterosaur-flies-into-limelight-this-national-fossil-day/>.
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myhauntedsalem · 6 months ago
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The St. Louis Light
There isn’t much to see or do in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. This may explain why there’s been so much attention paid to the so ­called St. Louis Ghost Train, or the St. Louis Light, which is said to run along an old rail route outside the village of St. Louis. The phenomenon was featured on an episode of Unsolved Mysteries, and is said to either be an unidentified ghost train or the lantern light of a lost signalman said to have frozen to death in his search to find home.
Two Saskatchewan high schoolers, however, decided to investigate the St. Louis Light as a science project. Their award­ winning conclusion, later duplicated, was that the headlights of cars on a nearby highway were the cause of the bizarre event.
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fromcruise-instoconcours · 7 months ago
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One of a pair of Spirit of St. Louis replicas in the EAA Museum’s collection. This one remains airworthy.
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myhauntedsalem · 7 months ago
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St. Louis Cathedral  New Orleans, Louisiana
Lousiana is one of the country’s most infamous states when it comes to the supernatural. It is one of the oldest churches around and has a breathtaking view. Well-known personalities in history, such as voodoo queen Marie Laveau and french socialite Delphine Lalaurie, are just two of the many devoted people to set foot in here. These women were known for their love for the dark arts and slave torture; they are said to be two of the many entities walking among the living in the cathedral. People have also witnessed the apparitions of 6 men who were executed on the church grounds.
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fromcruise-instoconcours · 7 months ago
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Replica of the “Spirit of St. Louis” at the EAA Museum, one of a pair in the collection. This one has been retired, while the other is a flyer. Pretty impressive replica of Paris underneath as well.
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hmncuenco · 11 months ago
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nbamayne · a year ago
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rabbitcruiser · a year ago
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At 7:52 on May 20, 1927, Charles Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field in Long Island, New York, on the world’s first solo non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean.
He touched down at Le Bourget Field in Paris at 22:22 the next day.
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