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#soraya chemaly
hypergraphic-rhino · 8 days ago
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when Soraya Chemaly said “Rage became a layer of my skin.” yeah, i felt that.
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3/15 Book Deals
Good morning, everyone! It’s definitely been a hot minute since I’ve posted a deals post (sorry!), but I finally took my big MA comprehensive exam on Saturday so now I’m done with that and have a tiny bit of time back since I don’t have to study anymore!
How have you all been!? How’s weather--is it getting normal again? We actually have rain today, which is an extremely rare occurrence, so that’s pretty fun. I hope you’re all doing well physically and mentally, it’s definitely still been a rough time for all us and I know I am having a hard time, so I hope you guys are able to find some peace and happiness somewhere. :)
There are some great books on sale today, so definitely have a look if you are in need of some reading material. :) Seems like a nice mix of fiction, contemporary, fantasy, nonfiction, etc., so hopefully a little something for everyone!
I hope you all have a fantastic start to your week, happy reading! :)
Today’s Deals:
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Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz - https://amzn.to/30Yh53v
American Gods by Neil Gaiman - https://amzn.to/30LGw8c
I Am Still Alice by Kate Alice Marshall - https://amzn.to/2OrMI2K
The Sisters Grimm by Menna van Praag - https://amzn.to/3eHIfUa
The Son of Neptune (The Heroes of Olympus Bk. 2) by Rick Riordan - https://amzn.to/3bQ05lS
The Street by Ann Petry & Tayari Jones - https://amzn.to/30LXkMo
Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes - https://amzn.to/3bQhXNP
The Invitation by Lucy Foley - https://amzn.to/38YJDhJ
The Dragon's Path by Daniel Abraham - https://amzn.to/3qROKpM
The Fifth Doll by Charlie N. Holmberg - https://amzn.to/3cD2WOB
Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima by Jim Mahaffey - https://amzn.to/3bOtYmU
Inventology: How We Dream Up Things that Can Change the World by Pagan Kennedy - https://amzn.to/3qQdDCa
The Madame Curie Complex: The Hidden History of Women in Science by Julie Des Jardins -  https://amzn.to/3bM8SWc
 The Native American Experience by Dee Brown - https://amzn.to/30Hym0w
Super Fake Love Song by David Yoon - https://amzn.to/3qQep22
The Bookshop of Yesterdays by Amy Meyerson - https://amzn.to/3bPAHwK
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women's Anger by Soraya Chemaly - https://amzn.to/2OA2Rmv
Slade House by David Mitchell - https://amzn.to/3rPkai7
NOTE:  I am categorizing these book deals posts under the tag #bookdeals, so if you don’t want to see them then just block that tag and you should be good. I am an Amazon affiliate in addition to a Book Depository affiliate and will receive a small (but very much needed!)  commission on any purchase made through these links.
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thereisaheat · a month ago
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TED TALK 2018
ENG/ESP
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librosclases · a month ago
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Ignorar la rabia no convierte en mujeres que no nos preocupamos por nosotras mismas y le permite a la sociedad ignorarnos también. Vale la pena subrayar que tratar el dolor y la rabia de las mujeres de este modo hace más fácil que nos exploten: en la reproducción, el trabajo, el sexo y la ideología
Soraya Chemaly. Rabia somos todas.
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What if we used frustration, irritation, humiliation, anger, and other ‘negative’ feelings to be methodical and demanding? First at home, then at school, then at work. This would mean critically assessing the comforting habits we support out of nostalgia and tradition, which would require no small measure of effort. It means walking out of places of worship, not buying certain movie tickets, closing certain books and picking up others, refusing to pay for certain products, and finding compelling ways to disagree with friends and family at the dinner table. It means explaining to grandparents, engaging with school administrators, and demanding rights at work. The slow and productive burn of anger is an asset. But leveraging it means taking a risk: the risk of finding out how much what you care about matters to your community.
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, by Soraya Chemaly
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By naturalizing the idea that girls and women aren't angry but are sad, by insisting that they keep their anger to themselves, we render women's feelings and demands mute with little social value. When we call our anger sadness instead of anger, we often fail to acknowledge what is wrong, specifically in a way that discourages us from imagining and pursuing change. Sadness, as an emotion, is paired with acceptance. Anger, on the other hand, invokes the possibility of change and of fighting back.
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, by Soraya Chemaly
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pclysemia · 7 months ago
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That anger metaphors are filled with kitchen imagery—anger simmers and smolders before reaching a boiling point; a person has to “mull things over” and “cool off”; we are supposed to “contain” or “put a lid” on our anger, or it will leave a bad “taste in the mouth”—strikes me as more than an interesting coincidence. As women, we often have to bite our tongues, eat our words, and swallow our pride. It’s almost, as one of my daughters put it, as if we are supposed to keep our anger in the kitchen.
Soraya Chemaly, Rage Becomes Her
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virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
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“Anger is an assertion of rights of worth. It is communication, equality, and knowledge. It is intimacy, acceptance, fearlessness, embodiment, revolt, and reconciliation. Anger is memory and rage. It is rational thought and irrational pain. Anger is freedom, independence, expansiveness, and entitlement. It is justice, passion, clarity, and motivation. Anger is instrumental, thoughtful, complicated, and resolved. In anger, whether you like it or not, there is truth.” 
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
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virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
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“If you find yourself easily frustrated, irritable, and stressed, the focus of your anger is almost certainly misplaced. Flying off the handle in unpredictable ways rarely makes change or makes you feel better. Anger like this is usually a symptom of unaddressed emotions and, almost always, a history of having learned that expressing your emotions is not only bad but also makes you a bad person.”
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
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virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
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“Be brave enough to stop pleasing people, to be disliked, to rub people the wrong way. In many environments, all you have to do to be castigated as an angry woman is to say something out loud, so you might as well say exactly what’s bothering you and get on with it. This means that, usually, you have to come to terms with not always being likes. Your anger and assertiveness will make some people unhappy, uncomfortable, sensitive, and cautious. They will resent you, your thoughts, your words. They will hate your willingness to risk social connections and challenge social conventions. Be prepared to be labelled bitchy, humorless, difficult, a spoilsport, and a ruiner of parties, meetings, dinners, and picnics.”
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
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just0nemorepage · a year ago
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Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women's Anger || Soraya Chemaly || 364 pages --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Top 3 Genres: Non-Fiction / Feminism / Politics
Synopsis: Women are angry, and it isn’t hard to figure out why.
We are underpaid and overworked. Too sensitive, or not sensitive enough. Too dowdy or too made-up. Too big or too thin. Sluts or prudes. We are harassed, told we are asking for it, and asked if it would kill us to smile. Yes, yes it would.
Contrary to the rhetoric of popular “self-help” and an entire lifetime of being told otherwise, our rage is one of the most important resources we have, our sharpest tool against both personal and political oppression. We’ve been told for so long to bottle up our anger, letting it corrode our bodies and minds in ways we don’t even realize. Yet our anger is a vital instrument, our radar for injustice and a catalyst for change. On the flip side, the societal and cultural belittlement of our anger is a cunning way of limiting and controlling our power.
We are so often told to resist our rage or punished for justifiably expressing it, yet how many remarkable achievements in this world would never have gotten off the ground without the kernel of anger that fueled them? Rage Becomes Her makes the case that anger is not what gets in our way, it is our way, sparking a new understanding of one of our core emotions that will give women a liberating sense of why their anger matters and connect them to an entire universe of women no longer interested in making nice at all costs.
Following in the footsteps of classic feminist manifestos like The Feminine Mystique and Our Bodies, Ourselves, Rage Becomes Her is an eye-opening book for the twenty-first century woman: an engaging, accessible credo offering us the tools to re-understand our anger and harness its power to create lasting positive change.
Publication Date: September 2018. / Average Rating: 4.37. / Number of Ratings: 2850~.
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rakastiikeri · a year ago
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The most dangerous man a woman will encounter is the one sitting at her own dinner table, yet media continue to focus on horrific crimes perpetrated by strangers and acquaintances. This violence should be treated seriously in and of itself, but it is also meaningful to understanding public violence. The single most accurate predictor of violent crime is a man’s felony domestic violence conviction. For instance, 58 percent of mass shooters have histories of domestic violence. Nine of the ten most lethal mass killings in the United States involved men with histories of domestic abuse. Three of the deadlier mass shootings of 2017—one in Plano, Texas, in which seven were killed, another in which eight people died in rural Mississippi, and a third in which twenty-seven were killed in Sutherland Springs, Texas—were committed by estranged husbands enraged that their wives had chosen to end their marriages. Killings like these are not considered political or terroristic, even though in effect they are both. 
— Soraya Chemaly, Chapter 6: Smile, Baby, Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger
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wishbzne · a year ago
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While anger in girls and women is overwhelmingly portrayed as irrational, it is, in fact, completely rational. Girls learn to filter their existences through messages of powerlessness and cultural worthlessness. Girls might be more inclined to depression because coming to terms with your own cultural marginalization and irrelevance is depressing. Why isn’t this making you angry?
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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wishbzne · a year ago
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As they age, girls are effectively taught to put others needs first and are, indeed, rewarded for doing so, well into adulthood. The result, for many girls and women, long into old age, is a host of physical, psychological, and emotional damages. Anger impairs people’s immune systems, contributes to high blood pressure, heart damage, migraines, skin ailments, and chronic fatigue. Unresolved anger contributes to stress, tension, anxiety, depression, and excessive nervousness. It is now estimated that 30% of all teen girls have anxiety disorders.
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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wishbzne · a year ago
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Bottling up anger is as harmful, if not more so, than anger exhibited in violent outbursts.
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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wishbzne · a year ago
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Interestingly, the reasons men and women tend to get angry differ. A 15-year study of girls and women found that there are three primary causes of anger that are not the same in men: feelings of powerlessness, injustice, and other people’s irresponsibility.
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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wishbzne · a year ago
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Anger is so successfully sublimated that girls lose the ability to understand what it feels and looks like. Is her heart racing? Does she feel flushed or shaky? Does she clench her jaws at night? Is she breaking out in hives? Does she cry for no reason? Laugh inappropriately during difficult conversations? Fly off the handle over something that seems inconsequential? You can see where I’m going here… those crazy girl hormones, right? Better to just think of it as a phase. For too many women, however, the phase never ends. It’s lives spent never expressing anger at all and believing that they don’t have the right or ability to do so without great risk.
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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wishbzne · a year ago
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Anger is diverted in women, who, as girls, lose even the awareness of their own anger as anger. Girls are taught, through politeness norms that suppress disruptive behavior, to use indirect methods of dealing with rage. For example, it’s 'unladylike' to be loud, or 'vulgar' to curse, yell, or seem unattractive. Adaptable girls find socially acceptable ways to internalize or channel their discomfort and ire, sometimes at great personal cost. Passive aggressive behavior, anxiety, and depression are common effects. Sarcasm, apathy, and meanness have all been linked to suppressed rage. Troublesome behaviors, such as lying, skipping school, bullying other people, even being socially awkward are often signs that a teenager is dealing with anger that they are unable to name as anger.
Soraya Chemaly, from Does Your Daughter Know It's OK To Be Angry?
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