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#screenwriting
words-pics-flicks · 2 hours ago
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Writing is easy. It's the rewriting - when you have to go and put a clinical analysis to your work - that's grinding.
John Logan (BAFTA/BFI Screenwriters’ Lecture Series)
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indie-struggle · 15 days ago
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Too many rewrites can destroy your work.
I know it sounds crazy, but it's one of those untold, and often unrecognized truths about writing. You can rework something over and over and over again, only to realize that it is either no better, or far worse than its original. Or, maybe, that it doesn't even belong. That doesn't mean you shouldn't rewrite. Of course you should. What it does mean is that you should try and learn how to know when something is done. By done, I do not mean 100% perfect. I just mean perfect for itself. Even Paddy Chayefsky's work was modified once taken into productions because of a number of factors: Director choice, Actors, time, him, etc. The difference between page to delivery: the written word to out-of-the-actor's-mouth (or Editor's), can be very different than what is originally written. Not in all cases, but you get my point. Once you have gotten what you feel is the scene, and what the scene is about is clear and works, a Director and Actor should know this, and they will (if they're worth a damn). They can break down the scene into a silent dance without any dialogue if they wanted, and it would still make sense. They could take your beautifully thought out, couldn't have been written better by the greatest writer of our time, and mangle it if they wanted. If it kept its purpose, it will still work. If you've done your work, and the scene works, it will not change the purpose of the scene. Therefore, all of your petite changes after the fact, to dialogue, and that brevity busy work with exposition (that remains the same actions), has little if nothing at all to do with whether or not you have a scene that works. So stop rewriting it. Rewriting a scene that already has its spine, its sense, its pace in your mind, and moves the story forward or gives us information about character, over and over and over, can fuck it up completely.
(This is what writers for hire do, by the way: we fuck up other writer's work, get paid, and another writer comes in and fucks up our work and gets paid--it's nothing new. Also, you get no credit... and you want to do this for a living, ha.) How do you know when it's done? If it does this, it is done. Ask yourself: what is this scene about? Whose scene is it? Does it make sense and work? Is it in the right place? Do I even need it? If the answer is there, and it's yes, then it's done. There. All it took was blood. Remember, you can always change at any point in time, and some asshole will probably want you to change it later, anyhow. Granted, being done is easier to determine for experienced writers than new ones, and it does take time to master, but it's even hit and miss there as well. I wrote something I was convinced was done, and someone wanted it changed. How is this possible, it works, what’s the problem? Well, they simply don’t like this or that, or the color of a hat. Yippie.
Another time, a rewrite was a total. It wasn't a hat to a ball, or a line of dialogue. It was an entirely different need, place, and purpose. A total rewrite of a scene: a kid to a cow. It was a different scene and therefore the previous was completely thrown away. All that hard work for nothing... c’est la vie.
Don’t over rewrite.
Here’s a tip. If you're unhappy with what you've got, you need to find out the reason why you're unhappy. This is obvious, and also hard. But that's when you rewrite and rewrite until you find out if it's even needed, or has done any of the former. It will come. Some strange force within your mind will make it happen. Just like loosening a bolt you’re convinced isn’t coming off until you approached it another way and it did. Don't over think it. The great thing about writing is that you can always go back. Always. Those words you wrote aren't lost to time. You can get them from a previous draft and start over again...
So, don't fret, but also, don't over rewrite. You just might kill what worked.
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scriptwriters-network · 8 hours ago
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Pitch Boot Camp PBC on 4/17
PBC is designed to drill prospective screenwriters into delivering professional, concise and interesting pitches comfortably and sincerely to anyone at any time in any place under any conditions.
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For more details…
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scriptwriters-network · 10 hours ago
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Creative Writing Challenge – April
This MONTHLY challenge is for those who want to work on writing new ideas & who would like to maintain a continuous creativity flow with your writing. This challenge is just another way for you to work on your writing .
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Find our mote here.
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scriptwriters-network · 13 hours ago
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Hollywood Outreach Program (HOP) ~ Early bird Deadline: May 13, 2021
The program’s objective is to help writers improve their craft so they may learn the skills necessary to help them achieve their goal of selling or optioning their work.
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More info here.
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scriptwriters-network · 17 hours ago
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Definition of high concept: a story with such a unique idea that the idea alone will drive people to the theaters.
Pilar Alessandra / On the Page ®  200 Writing Tips
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words-pics-flicks · a day ago
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[In screenwriting] for any ending to surprise an audience, it's first got to surprise you.
Frank Cottrell Boyce (screenwriter)
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dylantagnan · a day ago
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“People do have problems with this version of the film, and they’ll quibble with the length, and they’ll quibble with the way that certain characters are written. But that I can take, because that is actual critique of my work. That’s fair game, and that I’ll engage with any day. People can quarrel with the movie, but at least they’re quarreling with my version and with Zack’s version of the film.”
I may not like Snyder’s movies, or agree with how he does cinema (or the way he responds to public criticism of his own fandom), but I deeply respect Chris Terrio as a writer and storyteller and I sympathize with his heartbreak. Terrio is a reasonable guy. At least he gets^ why criticism is so important. He’s not the type of industry pro that would silence critics, shame them, or encourage bullying in any way. Differences in creative decisions aside, Terrio actually acknowledges many of the issues we‘ve pointed out, and he considers it fair play to receive all sorts of feedback. I’ve always had a problem with fans demeaning the very nature and purpose of film criticism, and I’m not ashamed to say I take it rather personally. But Terrio understands the role critics (whether professional or casual) play in the growth and development of movies, way more than any fan I’ve seen. So he has my respect and sympathies. He’s not wrong, you know. It is true writers often get the shorter end of the stick.
My only gripe is with Snyder himself (and the fanbase of course) — I just feel Terrio’s style is better suited for someone else. Tbh, when I found out Ben Affleck was actively involved in rewriting the script for BvS, I was pretty excited. I assumed Ben would be taking over from Snyder, which didn’t happen, but I still think it would have made for an even better film. BvS and JL both. I’m curious about how he worded that last statement. Does that mean a purely Terrio cut of the screenplay exists? I would be thrilled to read that. Just Terrio, no Snyder. But I’ll probably never get the chance.
I still can’t with ZSJL, but this was a wonderful interview. And I really liked hearing from the screenwriter for once. That part of filmmaking I get. Chris Terrio deserves way better.
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filmcourage · a day ago
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(Watch the video interview on Youtube here)
99% Of Screenplays Are Ruined By Things That Shouldn't Be There - Jeff Kitchen
Film Courage: We’ve been talking a lot about the unnecessary and how it kills scripts and you said how 98% (possibly even 99.5%) of scripts are totally unreadable?
Jeff Kitchen, Dramatist / Author / Founder / Consultant: It has to do with both storytelling and scriptwriting craft because a great story that is not stageworthy doesn’t work. In theater they have this term, they say It’s a great story but it’s not stageworthy. Yes, it sounds great around a campfire but we can’t perform it on stage in a way that will grip an audience. You can have the best story in the world but if it doesn’t work dramatically…(Watch the video interview on Youtube here).
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Friday Night Social Networking Event – April 2nd
Our POPULAR Friday Night Social Networking Event is an ONLINE  event that meets the first Friday of every month & is a way for TV & feature writers to meet one another which has evolved into so much more.
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Find out more here.
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phodophobia97 · a day ago
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On the hunt for writer friends 😅 I’m in grad school for screenwriting and would love to know other up coming writers! ☺️
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Pitch Boot Camp Saturday
PBC is designed to drill prospective screenwriters into delivering professional, concise and interesting pitches comfortably and sincerely to anyone at any time in any place under any conditions.
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For more details…
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kiingocreative · a day ago
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The following is an excerpt from The Structure of Story, available now at kiingo.com/book.
What's a Self-Revelation?
A self-revelation is a moment when a character realizes something about themselves (often that they need to drop their façade, heal their moral weakness, and become individuated). In story structure, the self-revelation occurs once the character is in the right headspace to begin looking inward.
There's often a specific trigger that causes the self-revelation. The trigger might be something familiar seen in a new light (i.e. in a new context). That which was overlooked gains new meaning after the character's passage through the "loss or hollow victory" beat. The self-revelation beat may give rise to a new dramatic question, which typically lasts until the climax.
The Self-Revelation and Objects
The self-revelation trigger is perhaps most powerful when it occurs via an object that carries new meaning or significance to the character. In Up, the trigger is Carl and Ellie's adventure book. Carl sees a message from Ellie that says, "Thanks for the adventure — now go have a new one!" Carl also sees Russell's Boy Scout sash. Putting these two objects together helps Carl realize that in order to best memorialize Ellie, he needs to form new relationships and have new adventures.
A self-revelation trigger might also be a phrase, line of dialogue, a look, a smell, a discovery, a behavior, etc. In Toy Story, Buzz sees the word "Andy" written in Sharpie on his foot and he realizes the importance of being a toy and taking care of one's child.
The trigger might also occur through the use of a clone character. For instance, a character might realize that they're a womanizer by seeing someone else they respected have an affair. It's only at this moment that they make the connection to their own immoral behavior.
The Thematic Desire
It's in this moment of self-revelation that a "thematic desire" may be born within the character. This thematic desire is the character's desire to undo the negative consequences that they either caused through immoral action or allowed through inaction.
The character must make things right, own their mistakes, prove their individuation, and more generally champion and defend the correct value system in the face of the opposing worldview. In Up, for instance, Carl sets out to have a new adventure by helping both Russell and Kevin.
Sometimes this thematic desire completely overrides the character's dramatic desire and thus the character's "need" overtakes their "want." Other times, the character may devise a way to attain their dramatic desire through the use of the thematic desire (such as Luke's use of the force and "faith" to destroy the Death Star). In other words, the character will use their new understanding or value system in order to accomplish their dramatic goal. This thematic approach to their goal will propel the character toward the climax.
The False Self-Revelation
It's worth noting that it's also possible for a character to come to a false self-realization in this moment. Instead of recognizing that their flaw is the source of all of their problems, they may instead decide to lay the blame on others and on the world at large. In these instances, the character has a change in their worldview but learns nothing about themselves. This moment of false self-revelation can result in the corruption or disillusionment of a hero and the birth of a villain.
This false self-revelation may give rise to a negative thematic desire. The corrupted or disillusioned character may set out to prove their new immoral worldview correct or may seek justice against those who they blame for their loss.
The Hidden Self-Revelation
While the character almost always realizes the error of their ways at the self-revelation moment, it's possible that the character won't reveal the specific details of their self-revelation (i.e. the lesson learned). The character may bolt into action as they pursue their new thematic desire, but they may also leave the audience in the dark as to what they're trying to accomplish. The details of the thematic desire will be dramatized through action at the story's Great Decision Moment (i.e. the climax). This pattern makes use of a dramatic technique called "unstated desire," which we'll later explore in detail.
The self-revelation is the moment when the character realizes that their moral weakness has been the source of their troubles. This revelation results in a change of worldview--for good or bad--and may result in a new thematic desire to undo the damage done during their moral decay.
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Television Outreach Program (TOP) ~ Early bird Deadline: May 13, 2021
Submissions are now open!
The TOP is a Scriptwriters Network program to support undiscovered television writing talent. The program’s objective is to help writers improve their craft so that they may achieve their goals of obtaining representation, script development, mentoring and career counseling services, landing writing assignments, and/or selling their work.
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Find out more here.
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Registering Your Script & Copyright Protection. 
Copyright is a form of protection, to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. 
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To find out more, click here.
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Fish out of water eventually needs an agenda. Cute when outsider tries to fit in; but mission is needed to keep the story moving.
Pilar Alessandra / On the Page ®  200 Writing Tips
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deocardoso · a day ago
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What we have to start the day.
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theoraclemachine · a day ago
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T.O.M. pg 064
Wasn’t so when I wrote it but… as of last month, #AI learning from videos is now a thing – see this article here. So AI can now presumably watch youtube videos too, and go beyond object recognition, & learn actions & consequences (much like a human child). I think this has huge implications.The interview sequence is me in the comic – based on an interview I once did with a Himba queen in Namibia,…
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