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#royal horse artillery
blackswaneuroparedux · 5 days ago
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Non nobis solum nati sumus ortusque nostri partem patria vindicat, partem amici.
- Cicero, De Officiis  – On Duties (44 BC)
We are not born for ourselves alone; a part of us is claimed by our nation, another part by our friends.
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blackswaneuroparedux · 22 days ago
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Without duty, life is soft and boneless.
- Joseph Joubert
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blackswaneuroparedux · a month ago
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An action, to have moral worth, must be done from duty.
- Immanuel Kant  
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hippography · 2 months ago
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A Royal Field Artillery Sergeant on horseback, poses for the amateur photographer, Alfred Dupire at 45, Rue d'Amiens, Warloy-Baillon in 1916. This is from another collection of glass plates found a few years ago.The images came to light thanks to three local men: Bernard Gardin, a photography enthusiast; Dominique Zanardi, proprietor of the 'Tommy' café at Pozières, a village in the heart of the Somme battlefields; and Joel Scribe, a local builder and collector of First World War memorabilia. Gardin and Zanardi assembled the collection of 400 or so images, rescued over the past eight years from attics, skips and jumble sales in the Somme area. Separately, Scribe had acquired another 200 images. (Colourised today by Doug) 
WW1 Colourised Photos
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anatomy-lesson · 4 years ago
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“Committed For Trial,” Daily British Whig (Kingston). March 27, 1917. Page 02. ---- Joseph Walsh Pleaded Not Guilty to Charge of Theft and Forgery --- Joseph Walsh, arrested a week ago at Windsor charged with the theft of blank Government cheques and with forging two cheques the property of ‘C’ Battery, R.C.H.A., pleaded ‘not guilty’ when arraigned before Magistrate Farrell in police court on Tuesday morning. The accused was committed to stand trial. He elected trial before a jury.
Evidence was given that Walsh was a former orderly at headquarters for ‘C’ Battery, R.C.H.A., and it is alleged that he broke open a desk there with a chisel and made off with three black Government cheques, and that he also forged two cheques for a total of $150. ==== “H. C. Asselstine, Arthur Kenchan and George W. Lankins are accused of stealing a dog; Josseph Walsh is up on two charges of theft and forgery, in connection with military pay cheques; Terence Fitzgerald and James Fitzgerald will stand trial on a charge of assault, causing actual bodily harm. , During the afternoon, Walsh was arraigned on the charges lodged against him, and to each charge entered a plea of not guilty.” - from the Daily British Whig (Kingston). June 12, 1917. Page 02. ==== “Two Years For Forgery,” Daily British Whig (Kingston). June 13, 1917. Page 05. --- Joseph Walsh, who while a soldier here, stole Government cheques and forged and cashed them, was sentenced to two years in Portsmouth penitentiary by Judge Lavell on Wednesday afternoon. On Tuesday he pleaded not guilty, but on advice of T. J. Rigney, who was requested by the judge to represent the prisoner, he pleaded guilty and received the sentence. He is thirty two years of age.
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hippography · 4 months ago
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15 May 1918 Gunners of the Royal Field Artillery training their horses in gas mask drill near Mont-Saint-Éloi, Nord-Pas-de-Calais. The ruins of the abbey can be seen in the background. (Photographer - Second Lieutenant David McLellan) (© IWM Q 8794) On the hill overlooking Arras stand the remains of the two towers which bear testament not only to the once-powerful Mont-Saint-Eloi Abbey but also to the savage fighting that took place in the area during the Great War. From the beginning of the War the abbey towers were used by French troops to observe German positions on Lorette Spur and Vimy Ridge. The suspicions of the French soldiers were aroused when Germans fired upon their every movement until it was realised that what was giving them away was not a spy but the birds nesting on the towers which took flight when troops disturbed them. In early 1916 the British Army relieved French troops in the sector. The latter had established an extension to the local cemetery in Ecoivres, at the foot of the hill, to bury 786 of their soldiers who died there, mostly in the fighting of 1915. A military tramway used to carry supplies to the troops at the front also served as an ambulance to bring back the dead and wounded. This transport system conferred on Ecoivres Military Cemetery an unusual feature in that, from the French extension to the Cross of Sacrifice, the graves of the mostly British and Canadian soldiers are in chronological order relating to the date of death: the graves of the men of the 46th North Midland Division who relieved the French in March 1916 are followed by those of the 25th Division who fell in the German attack at the foot of Vimy Ridge in May 1916; next come the men of the 47th London Division who died between July and October 1916 and finally the graves of the Canadians who lost their lives in the successful assault on Vimy Ridge in April 1917. (Colourised by Benjamin Thomas) https://www.facebook.com/coloursofyesterday 
WW1 Colourised Photos
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blackswaneuroparedux · 7 months ago
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Vires acquirit eundo.**
- Virgil
You’ve come a long way. The hard work begins now.
**We gather strength as we go.
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blackswaneuroparedux · 7 months ago
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Now it seems to me that there are bad ways of loving a horse: ways that are bad for the horse, and also bad for the one who loves him. A love that regards the horse as a play-thing, whose purpose is to satisfy the whims of a rider, to be an object of cuddling and caressing of a kind that the horse himself can neither reciprocate nor understand – such a love is a way of disregarding the horse. It is also in its own way corrupt. A person who lavishes this kind of affection on a horse is either deceiving himself or else taking pleasure in a fantasy affection, treating the horse as a means to his own emotion, which has become the real focus of his concern. The horse has become the object of a self-regarding love, a love without true care for the thing that occasions it. Such a love takes no true note of the horse, and is quite compatible with a ruthless neglect of the animal, when it loses (as it will) its superficial attractions. Horses treated in this way are frequently discarded, like the dolls of children.
- Sir Roger Scruton, Confessions of a Heretic: Selected Essays    
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anatomy-lesson · a year ago
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“Canada’s Artillerymen Come From Every Province To Learn Their Trade At Kingston,” Toronto Star. May 4, 1940. Page 19. ---- TWO SECONDS IS THE TIME IT TAKES FOR THE ‘SUICIDE CLUB’ TO UNLIMBER AND START FIRING --- The Royal Canadian Artillery Training Centre at Kingston is an all-Canadian concern. Its members are recruited from every province and go there for an intensive 16-week course, after which they’re ready for a holding company in England, as reinforcements for the first division. IN the gun crew at LEFT for example, are men from Campbellton, N.B., Quebec City, Kingston, Brighton, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, and Lacombe, Alberta. First four weeks of the course are devoted to learning the general principles of artillery and army life. For the next 12 weeks the men concentrate on actual artillery work, or they may specialize in anti-tank gunnery. Mascot of the anti-tank battery is Brutus, pictured at CENTRE with Sergt. A. H. V. Perfect. They call this battery the ‘Suicide Club,’ probably because anyone who crosses them in battle is running into just that. The men can set up and begin firing the two-pound anti-tank gun at RIGHT in just two second, gas masks and all.
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hippography · 9 months ago
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R.H.A. GUN TEAM HORSE 
Sir Walter Gilbey, 1898, The Harness Horse, Vinton & Co., London
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blackswaneuroparedux · a year ago
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Si post fata venit gloria, non propero.
- Martial
If glory comes after death, I hurry not.
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womblegrinch · a year ago
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Lionel Edwards (1878-1966) - The silent battery - L Battery near Compiègne, France, 1914
Pen and ink and wash. 13.8 x 21.7 inches, 35 x 55 cm.
Estimate: £500-800.
Sold Cheffins, Cambridge, 11 March 2020 for £1500.
Edwards served in WWI as a Remount Purchasing Officer with the Army Remount Service, responsible for the purchase and training of horses and mules for the Army. Below is an account of the above engagement published in the Argus, Melbourne, Victoria, 8 Dec 1914:
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blackswaneuroparedux · a year ago
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Vires acquirit eundo.**
- Virgil
You’ve come a long way. The hard work begins now.
**We gather strength as we go.
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Where  men are forbidden to honour a king, they honor millionaires, athletes, or film stars instead; even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and  it will gobble poison.
- C. S. Lewis
Despite the pandemic, the Army made sure that Her Majesty’s Official Birthday Parade for Her 95th year was suitably spectacular and celebratory. Weeks before these same soldiers had gathered in the Windsor Castle Quadrangle for the solemn occasion of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral, but On Saturday 12th June as Scottish airs were piped, young guardsmen marched immaculately and horses gleamed, the mood was one of hope for a brighter future. The annual parade which ordinarily would take place on Horse Guards Parade in front of thousands of spectators and which is watched by millions throughout the Commonwealth and worldwide on TV, is a gift from the Household Division to The Queen and a reassurance to Her Majesty and the Nation, of the Armed Forces’ unstinting loyalty to the Crown. F Company Scots Guards Trooped the Colour of 2nd Battalion Scots Guards on 12 June in the Quadrangle at Windsor Castle, in a refined, socially distanced Queen’s Birthday Parade. The Queen was joined on the dais by HRH The Duke of Kent who is Royal Colonel Scots Guards. Although smaller than a traditional Trooping the Colour, due to rules over social distancing, this year’s parade had been carefully designed to incorporate many of the traditional elements. Irish Draught horses drew first world war era Royal Horse Artillery Guns; the Coldstream Guards and Grenadier Guards joined the Scots Guards on parade in their distinctive red tunics and bearskin caps, and the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment dazzled in their shining silver cuirasses and helmets. All were accompanied by music performed by the Army’s finest musicians drawn from the five Foot Guards Bands and the 1st Battalion Scots Guards Pipes and Drums.
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cambridgearchive · a day ago
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The Duke of Cambridge’s engagements of  The Irish Guards over the years
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The Duke of Cambridge appointed as Colonel of the Irish Guards by the Queen on 10 February 2011.
10 June 2011 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Senior Colonels' Conference and Dinner at Buckingham Palace.
11 June 2011 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of the 1st Battalion Scots Guards was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by General the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Gold Stick and Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General William Cubitt (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Matheson of Matheson, younger, Colonel Toby Browne (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Gerald Johnston (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Colonel Stuart Cowen (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Alastair Mathewson (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Speed, Scots Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Lincoln Jopp, Scots Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Eugenie of York, The Earl and Countess of Wessex with the Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duchess of Kent, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Nicholas van Cutsem, The Life Guards, and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard, the remaining Guards marching past Her Majesty. The Household Cavalry ranked past The Queen. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Wing Commander Roderick Dennis, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park under the command of Major Neil Cross and from HM Tower of London Saluting Station by the Honourable Artillery Company under the command of Major Christopher Allen.
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25 June 2011 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, and The Duchess of Cambridge attended a Medals Parade and Luncheon at Victoria Barracks, Sheet Street, Windsor, Berkshire.
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17 March 2012 - The Duchess of Cambridge, representing The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the St. Patrick's Day Parade at Mons Barracks, Princes Avenue, Aldershot, Hampshire.
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15 June 2012 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Senior Colonels' Conference and Dinner at Buckingham Palace. 
16 June 2012 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by General the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Gold Stick and Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General George Norton (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Matheson of Matheson, younger, Colonel Toby Browne (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Mark Hayhurst (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Colonel Stuart Cowen (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Hugh Bodington (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Speed, Scots Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Robin Sergeant, Coldstream Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, The Earl and Countess of Wessex with The Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duchess of Kent, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Mark Edward, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Simon Deverell, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard, the remaining Guards marching past Her Majesty. The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry ranked past The Queen. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Wing Commander Richard Wells, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Major Anthony Bagwell.
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17 March 2013 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, and The Duchess of Cambridge attended St. Patrick's Day Parade at Mons Barracks, Princes Avenue, Aldershot, Hampshire.
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14 June 2013 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Colonels Conference and Dinner at Buckingham Palace.
15 June 2013 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of the Welsh Guards was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by Field Marshal the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Gold Stick and Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General George Norton (Major General Commanding Household Division). Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Matheson of Matheson, younger, Colonel Toby Browne (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Oliver Morley (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Colonel Stuart Cowen (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Hugh Bodington (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Simon Soskin, Grenadier Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Dino Bossi, Welsh Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, The Earl and Countess of Wessex with The Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duchess of Kent, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Mark Edward, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Nicholas Stewart, The Life Guards, and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard, the remaining Guards marching past Her Majesty. The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry ranked past The Queen. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Wing Commander David Arthurton, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company.
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6 December 2013 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, took the salute and presented Afghanistan Operational Service Medals to No. 2 Company, 1st Battalion at a parade at Mons Barracks, Aldershot, Hampshire. 
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17 March 2014 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, and The Duchess of Cambridge presented Shamrock to the Irish Guards at Mons Barracks, Princes Avenue, Aldershot, Hampshire, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day. 
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14 June 2014 - Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards) was also present. Her Majesty was attended by General the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Gold Stick and Colonel, The Life Guards) and Major General Edward Smyth-Osbourne (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Matheson of Matheson, younger, Colonel Toby Browne (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Thomas Tollemache (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Lieutenant Colonel Paul Bedford (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Hugh Bodington (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Simon Soskin, Grenadier Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel the Hon. Charles Broughton, Grenadier Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall,  The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Eugenie of York, The Earl and Countess of Wessex, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Mark Edward, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Simon Lukas, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard, the remaining Guards marching past Her Majesty. The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry ranked past The Queen. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Squadron Leader Andrew King, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Major David Daniel. 
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26 November 2014 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, received Lieutenant Colonel Edward Boanas upon relinquishing his appointment as Commanding Officer and Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Turner upon assuming the appointment.
17 March 2015 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, and The Duchess of Cambridge presented Shamrock to the Irish Guards at Mons Barracks, Princes Avenue, Aldershot, Hampshire, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day.
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13 June 2015 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade  at which The Queen's Colour of the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards), The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons) and The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards). Her Majesty was attended by Field Marshal the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Gold Stick and Colonel, The Life Guards) and Major General Edward Smyth-Osbourne (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Colonel Toby Browne, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Vernon (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Thomas Tollemache (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Lieutenant Colonel Paul Bedford (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Hugh Bodington (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Simon Soskin, Grenadier Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Giles Harris, Welsh Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Robert Skeggs, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Warren Douglas, The Life Guards, and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard, the remaining Guards marching past Her Majesty. The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery and the Household Cavalry ranked past The Queen. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Wing Commander Ian Sharrocks, Royal Air Force, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Captain Felix Newton.
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9 July 2015 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended a Regimental Boxing Night at Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow, Middlesex.
17 March 2016 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel,  presented Shamrock to the Irish Guards at Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow, Middlesex, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day.
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10 June 2016 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Colonels Conference and Dinner at Buckingham Palace.
11 June 2016 - Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards (2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards) was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by Field Marshal the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General Sir James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General Edward Smyth-Osbourne (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Colonel Toby Browne, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Vernon (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Hugo Codrington (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Lieutenant Colonel James Gaselee (The Life Guards, Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Crispin Lockhart (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel David Hannah, Irish Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The Troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James Thurston, Coldsteam Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke of York with Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, The Earl and Countess of Wessex, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Robert Skeggs, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Alexander Owen, The Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons), and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Wing Commander James Freeborough, Royal Air Force, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Captain George Cobb. 
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2 March 2017 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, received Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Turner upon relinquishing his appointment as Commanding Officer and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Palmer upon assuming the appointment.
17 March 2017 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, and The Duchess of Cambridge  presented shamrock at Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow, Middlesex, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day and were received by Ms. Maria Pedro (Deputy Lieutenant of Greater London).
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17 June 2017 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards (1st Battalion Irish Guards) was trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons).
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4 October 2017 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended a Dinner at Baronscourt, Newtownstewart, County Tyrone.
5 October 2017 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards,  presented an Elizabeth Cross at Baronscourt, Newtownstewart, County Tyrone.
9 January 2018 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, received Colonel Tim Purdon upon relinquishing his appointment as Regimental Adjutant and Major Niall Hall upon assuming the appointment. Lieutenant General Mark Carleton-Smith (Regimental Lieutenant Colonel) was present.
17 March 2018 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, and The Duchess of Cambridge this morning presented Shamrock to the Regiment at Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow, Middlesex, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day.
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8 June 2018 - The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Senior Colonels' Conference and Dinner at Buckingham Palace.
9 June 2018 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade this morning at which The Queen's Colour of 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards was Trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of York (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by Field Marshal the Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank (Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General Sir James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General Benjamin Bathurst (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord Vestey (Master of the Horse), Colonel Toby Browne, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Vernon, Major Nana Twumasi-Ankrah (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Jocelyn Bucknall (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Major General Sir Edward Smyth-Osbourne (Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Colonel Crispin Lockhart (Chief of Staff), Lieutenant Colonel Harry Scott (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The Procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Guy Stone, Welsh Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Edwyn Launders, Coldstream Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, Princess Beatrice of York and Princess Eugenie of York, The Countess of Wessex, accompanied by the Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duchess of Kent, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Princess Alexandra, the Hon. Lady Ogilvy, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade. On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Harry Wallace, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Jeremy Sudlow (The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons), and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Squadron Leader Martin Wild, Royal Air Force, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired today by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Major George Cobb.
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30 September 2018 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, visited the British Army Training Unit Kenya, Laikipia, and was received by the British High Commissioner to the Republic of Kenya (Mr. Nicolas Hailey).
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17 March 2019 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, and The Duchess of Cambridge presented Shamrock to the Irish Guards at Cavalry Barracks, Hounslow, Middlesex, on the occasion of St. Patrick's Day.
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7 June 2019 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards, attended the Senior Colonels' Conference and Dinner at Clarence House.
9 June 2019 -  Her Majesty was present at The Queen's Birthday Parade on Horse Guards Parade at which The Queen's Colour of 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards was Trooped. The Queen was accompanied by The Duke of Kent (Colonel, Scots Guards), The Prince of Wales (Colonel, Welsh Guards), The Duke of York (Colonel, Grenadier Guards), The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel, Irish Guards) and The Princess Royal (Gold Stick in Waiting and Colonel, The Blues and Royals, Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons). Her Majesty was attended by Major General Sir Edward Smyth-Osbourne (Colonel, The Life Guards), Lieutenant General Sir James Bucknall (Colonel, Coldstream Guards) and Major General Benjamin Bathurst (Major General Commanding Household Division). The Lord de Mauley (Master of the Horse), Colonel Toby Browne, Major Nana Twumasi-Ankrah (Mounted Equerries in Waiting), Captain Jocelyn Bucknall (Coldstream Guards, Dismounted Equerry in Waiting) and Colonel Crispin Lockhart (Silver Stick in Waiting) were in attendance. Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Griffin (Silver Stick Adjutant) and the Household Division Staff were present. The Procession was led by Lieutenant Colonel Guy Stone, Welsh Guards (Brigade Major Household Division). The troops on Parade, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Piers Ashfield, Grenadier Guards (Field Officer in Brigade Waiting), received The Queen with a Royal Salute. The Duchess of Cornwall, The Duchess of Cambridge, Princess Beatrice of York, Princess Eugenie, Mrs. Jack Brooksbank and Mr. Jack Brooksbank, The Earl and Countess of Wessex, accompanied by the Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor and Viscount Severn, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duchess of Kent, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and other Members of the Royal Family drove to Horse Guards Parade and witnessed The Queen's Birthday Parade.  On the conclusion of the Parade, Her Majesty drove in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of The Queen's Guard, preceded by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, under the command of Major Harry Wallace, the Massed Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry, under the command of Major Thomas Seccombe (The Life Guards), and the Massed Bands of the Guards Division. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, The Queen's Guard entered the Forecourt and formed up opposite the Old Guard. Her Majesty, from Buckingham Palace, witnessed a fly-past by aircraft of the Royal Air Force, led by Squadron Leader Daniel Shaw, Royal Air Force, to mark the official celebration of The Queen's Birthday. Royal Salutes were fired  by The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery in Green Park and from the Tower of London Saluting Battery by the Honourable Artillery Company, under the command of Major Edward Shanklyn. 
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23 June 2020 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards,  spoke to soldiers from 1st Battalion via video link. 
5 May 2021 -  The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel, Irish Guards,  received Lieutenant Colonel Robert Money (Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion).
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josefavomjaaga · 8 days ago
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Helfert, Joachim Murat, Chapter 6, Part 2
Sorry for the long delays and brief snippet today. I’m truely pressed for time atm.
Murat had taken on the quality of a naval officer and assumed the name Campomele; but the incognito was not so strictly observed and soon there was not a man on the ship who did not know who was travelling with them. Now even Joachim made no secret of it, in whose soul, barely knowing that he had saved himself and was in admiring company, trustfulness, adventurousness, and pride found their way. "The kingdom of Naples will once more come under my control," he said to Galvani; "I will retake the throne which is guaranteed to me by the inextinguishable love of my subjects, my children. Yes, the Neapolitans are calling for Joachim, they are calling for their father. Ferdinand is hated. I only need to show myself and everything will fall to me".
At this point Helfert again adds a footnote about his source:
G. Ricciardi "Relazione autentica" in Arch. Stor. Ital. 1876 XXIV p. 71 f. The author assures that he has drawn his information from the personal communications of Galvani, who is said to have presented the main matter in an account published in Baris in 1843, which I do not know by sight. Strikingly, Franceschetti, "Mémoires sur les événements" etc., refers to the three naval officers Donnadieu, Langlade and Blancard as those who had landed in Bastia with the He-King, but says nothing of Galvani, whom he only later, p.51, calls Calvani and describes as Commissaire de guerre. In the main, the two narratives otherwise coincide, or more correctly, complement each other.
I feel as if Helfert goes into such detail about the sources here because he does not fully trust them himself.
On 25 August, before daybreak, the Balancelle arrived in the port of Bastia and landed a certain Campomele and his companions. The former, knowing the city to be in the hands of a royal French garrison, did not think it advisable to stay there, but hired horses and, accompanied by Galvani, immediately set off for the municipality of Vescovato, situated more in the interior of the island, whose mayor Colonna Ceccaldi was the father-in-law of Murat's former aide-de-camp Franceschetti. At noon they were on the spot, found a hospitable welcome and made themselves at home. He was given the royal title by his whole entourage, royal honour was bestowed upon him, which only strengthened him in his delusion of regaining the throne and crown, which he claimed he had never renounced. To the artillery colonel Verrière, who commanded in Bastia, they wrote: "the king has come to make use of Corsican hospitality until he has succeeded in asserting his rights with King Louis XVIII"; or also: "he only wants to wait for Fouché's answer, whom he has approached for passports in order to find a new home that suits him".
Source as per footnote: Colonna Ceccaldi's letters of August 25 and 26 with Verrière's reply in Franceschetti p. 127-131 (adding this in such detail just in case these books might be of interest for future research): „... afin de pouvoir se retirer librement et sans crainte chez la nation qui lui sera la plus convenable, en cas qu'il fût décidé qu'il ne peut habiter la France: "... in order to be able to withdraw freely and without fear to the nation that is most suitable for him, should it be decided that he cannot live in France".
These assurances were not at all consistent with the constant comings and goings of dismissed soldiers and officers from all parts of the island who had served under Murat or who were otherwise lured to him by his name, and among whom were also those of higher rank, such as Generals Ottavi and Gentili, Colonel Natali and others. Some of them, however, came only to pay their respects to the overthrown monarch, from whom they had received favours and honours; others were attracted by mere curiosity, and left again after they had satisfied it. But many stayed, especially officers; indeed, it was said that Murat kept them formally in pay, made promotions, awarded medals, so that they formed a kind of personal guard around him, and smaller detachments of gendarmes sent out by Verrière dared do nothing against them.
Here Helfert again quotes his sources in great detail in a footnote:
"En peu de jours le bourg de Vescovato devint la résidence d'une cour et le quartier général d'une armée"; Colletta - Gallois, Catastrophe de Joachim Murat ,p. 26 ... In a letter of 15 September, the Vescovato Municipality tried to present these events to Colonel Verrière in as innocuous a manner as possible: "La plupart ont été renvoyés et il n'en reste qu'un petit nombre qui va en diminuant de jour en jour". On the orders and decorations awarded, it was said: "Il pourrait se faire qu'il eût délivré en sa qualité de Roi de Naples, titre qu'il n'a pas abdiqué, étant encore moins dans l'intention de le faire, des certificats témoignant qu'il les leur avait accordées dans le temps"; Franceschetti, pp. 134-136.... On the other activities on the island, where there was a French and a British party, the latter spreading the rumour that Murat wanted to seize Corsica, and sent a deputation to the British general commanding in Genoa to ask for his protection and assistance, see ibid. pp. 13-16.
The commander of Bastia was not quite sure how to resolve the situation. On the one hand, he wanted the uninvited guest out of his vicinity and urgently wanted him to go on board, to which Murat pretended to agree and made his arrangements; but then again Verrière seized all the ships in the port of Bastia and especially the vehicles rented for the ex-king, because it was said that Murat wanted to use them for some kind of undertaking.
With each passing day, Joachim's resolve to reconquer his kingdom grew stronger; any notions with which the more prudent among his loyal followers tried to dissuade him from such a daring plan were in vain. Just as Napoleon insisted in 1813 that it was only the elements that had defeated him in Russia, his brother-in-law now persuaded himself that only treachery, the spreading of false rumours about his death, about an English landing and the like had brought about the discouragement of his army and thus its defeat. "There is not a man in that army at this moment," he said, "who has not learned to see his error; I will gather them around me, for they are eager to see me at their head." Only about the manner in which he should approach the matter did he change his resolutions. "My plan is ripe", he said one day to Galvani, "I will carry it out alone if they do not want to join me". He would land at Puzzuoli, go from there to Vomero, join the Duca de Gallo - whose doubletalk he had, after all, come to know! - or to Prince Belvedere, gather his followers around him as here in Vescovato, "and I shall see myself once more in possession of Naples!" Another time he intended to disembark at Granatello and take his way directly to the royal palace at Portici, where King Ferdinand was staying: "I know the secret passage that leads me straight to his bedroom." "But then your Majesty will have to kill him," Galvani interjected. "No! I will only require of him an act of renunciation on the kingdom of Naples and have him taken to Sicily immediately afterwards".
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nzeogwubook023 · 20 days ago
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✺[PDF] The Windsor Knot (Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, #1)
The Windsor Knot (Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, #1)
  Synopsis :
The first book in a highly original and delightfully clever crime series in which Queen Elizabeth II secretly solves crimes while carrying out her royal duties.It is the early spring of 2016 and Queen Elizabeth is at Windsor Castle in advance of her 90th birthday celebrations. But the preparations are interrupted when a guest is found dead in one of the Castle bedrooms. The scene suggests the young Russian pianist strangled himself, but a badly tied knot leads MI5 to suspect foul play was involved. The Queen leaves the investigation to the professionals?until their suspicions point them in the wrong direction.Unhappy at the mishandling of the case and concerned for her staff?s morale, the monarch decides to discreetly take matters into her own hands. With help from her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, a British Nigerian and recent officer in the Royal Horse Artillery, the Queen secretly begins making inquiries. As she carries out her royal duties with her usual aplomb, no
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kielsopple · 22 days ago
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The Windsor knot : a novel /
The first book in a highly original and clever new crime series featuring Queen Elizabeth II as an amateur detective who solves crimes in secret while carrying out her royal duties. Spring, 2016. Queen Elizabeth is at Windsor Castle in advance of her 90th birthday celebrations. When a guest is found dead in one of the Castle bedrooms, the scene suggests the young Russian pianist strangled himself, but a badly tied knot leads MI5 to suspect foul play was involved. Unhappy at the handling of the case and concerned for her staff's morale, the monarch--with help from her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, a British Nigerian and recent officer in the Royal Horse Artillery--begins making inquiries to bring a murderer to justice. from New Items https://highland.sparkpa.org/opac/extras//unapi?id=tag:open-ils.org,2021-05-25:biblio-record_entry/11547039/SPARK&format=opac
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blackswaneuroparedux · a month ago
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The Scots Greys and the turning of the tide at Battle of Waterloo
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They never consider the situation, never think of manoeuvring before an enemy and never keep back or provide a reserve. They’re charging at everything!
- Duke of Wellington reflecting on the charge of the British cavalry after the Battle of Maguilla in 1812
The Duke of Wellington was never pleased with his cavalry. In Spain he  condemned them for “charging at everything”, getting cut up in the  process or finding themselves on a distant part of the battlefield,  horses blown, at the very moment they were needed elsewhere. So at Waterloo the Iron Duke intended to keep the mounted arm on a tight rein.
It was, after all, the first time he would actually face Napoleon in  the field, and the situation was not auspicious. He had been taken by  surprise. He famously learnt of the sudden appearance of the French on  the border with the Southern Netherlands (now Belgium) at the Duchess of  Richmond’s ball in Brussels on 15 June. “Napoleon has humbugged me, by  God!” The following day his Prussian allies were worsted at Ligny. Hs  own troops, rushed forward to nearby Quatre Bras, were badly mauled. He  was on the back foot.
But his capacity to anticipate setbacks paid dividends. Some weeks  earlier he had chosen a piece of ground on which to make a stand if the  French were to come. The ridge of Mont St Jean, a mile south of the  village of Waterloo athwart the main road from Charleroi to Brussels.  The ridge ran north-east to south-west for about three miles, two-thirds  of which Wellington was able to occupy with infantry and artillery. To  support these he would post two brigades of light cavalry on the left  (east) flank and three on the right. Two brigades of heavy cavalry,  including the Scots Greys or, as they were then more properly known, the  2nd Royal (North British) Dragoons, would be in the centre. And to each  of the cavalry brigadiers, as well as to the Earl of Uxbridge (later  Marquess of Anglesey), the commander of the Allied cavalry and his  second in command, Wellington gave strict instructions not to leave  their positions without his express order.
The Duke was essentially a general who preferred to choose his  ground, make the enemy attack him and then use the superior musketry of  his infantry to defeat them. He intended Waterloo to be just such a  battle. In addition, for the first time he had the benefit of a strong  force of heavy cavalry inclusing the Scots Greys – bigger men, bigger  swords, bigger horses – to counter the French heavy cavalry or break up  an assault that threatened to overwhelm his infantry. And, indeed, the  charge of these two brigades, best known perhaps for Lady (Elizabeth)  Butler’s 1881 painting Scotland Forever! depicting the Scots Greys  galloping wildly at the French, would be one of the critical actions of  the battle, even, some argue, its turning point.
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The Scots Greys had been formed in 1681 from a number of independent  troops of dragoons (originally men who dismounted to fight with the  musket, rather than fight from the saddle with sword and pistol), and  known as The Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons. The “grey” of their later  title may at this time have referred to their uniform, for it was not  for a dozen years that this changed to red, and there is no record that  the Scots Greys used grey horses exclusively.
However, when inspected by King William III (William of Orange) in  1693 it was noted that the Scots Greys regiment were all mounted on  greys. Soon afterwards they were being referred to as the “Grey  Dragoons” or the “Scots Regiment of Grey Dragoons”. In 1707, after the  Act of Union, they were restyled “North British”, as the parliamentary  union envisaged Scotland to be. Not until 1877 would their nickname be  made official. They became the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys),  inverted after the First World War to The Royal Scots Greys (2nd  Dragoons). They kept this title for 50 years until amalgamating with the  3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales’s Dragoon Guards) to form the Royal  Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys).
When Napoleon escaped from Elba at the end of February 1815 to begin his  “Hundred Days”, the ill-starred attempt to retake the French crown and  continue his imperial ambitions, the Greys were one of a number of  regiments rushed to Belgium that had yet to fight “Napoleonic” troops.  Indeed, by the time of Waterloo few Scots Greys had seen battle - and  they were keen to make up for it.
Their moment came in the early afternoon of 18 June, when it looked as  if Wellington’s line at Waterloo would break. The Comte d’Erlon’s corps  of three infantry divisions, some 14,000 men, with 6,000 cavalry,  assaulted the Allied left wing and centre, which was held by  Dutch-Belgian brigades and Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas Picton’s 5th  Division, the latter experienced Peninsular troops.
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As d’Erlon’s men ascended the slope towards the sunken road that ran  the length of the ridge left of La Haye Sainte, driving back the British  skirmishers and reaching the thick hedge that fringed the road,  Picton’s men stood up, formed into a four-deep line to guard against  cavalry attack, advanced and began volleying.
However, the French deployed unusually quickly into line and returned  fire. Picton himself was killed after ordering a counter-attack in  language profane even by his own legendary standards, and soon his  troops were giving way under the pressure of numbers. At two o’clock  Napoleon appeared to be winning the Battle of Waterloo.
But Lieutenant-General the Earl of Uxbridge was a cavalry commander  of genius. Earlier estranged from Wellington on account of eloping with  the Duke’s youngest brother’s wife, he had been disbarred from service  in the Peninsula after brilliantly covering Sir John Moore’s gruelling  retreat to Corunna. But his cavalry coup d’oeil had not deserted him,  nor his moral courage. Despite the Duke’s orders that none of the  cavalry was to quit the ground it had been posted on without his express  will, Uxbridge ordered his two brigades – the Household Brigade (1st  and 2nd Life Guards, Royal Horse Guards and 1st (King’s) Dragoon Guards)  and the Union Brigade, so-called for its English, Scots and Irish  regiments (1st Royal Dragoons, 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons, and the  Scots Greys) – to charge in support of the hard-pressed infantry.
With a combined strength of nearly 2,500 sabres and led by Uxbridge,  the heavies advanced. The Household Brigade was first into the charge,  sweeping back the cuirassiers guarding d’Erlon’s left flank. To the  Household’s left the Union Brigade surged through the lines of  red-coated infantry in the sunken road, where some Gordon Highlanders  grasped their stirrups to get at the French, and at the foot of the  slope routed the two advanced infantry brigades of General Joachim  Quiot’s division, the Royals, capturing the eagle of the 105th Ligne  while Sergeant Ewart of the Greys, 6ft 4in tall and a master swordsman  and rider, captured the eagle of the 45th Ligne.
Only two eagles were  captured that day.
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As with the Household, however, the officers of the Union Brigade  were finding it difficult to rein in their troops, and the heavies lost  all cohesion. With many casualties and still trying to reorder, the  Greys now found themselves before the main French lines, their horses  blown, though some galloped on to attack the guns of the Grande  Batterie. This was too much for Napoleon, who had hitherto left the  conduct of the battle to Marshal Michel Ney. He promptly ordered a  counter-attack by two cuirassier brigades and Baron Jacquinot’s two  Polish lancer regiments (a charge also painted by Lady Butler).
As  Major-General Sir William Ponsonby tried to rally his brigade he was  captured by Jacquinot’s men, whereupon several Greys galloped to their  brigadier’s rescue but the lancers at once killed him and three of his  would-be rescuers, who could do nothing to overcome the lance’s reach.  The rest of the heavies might also have been speared or sabred had it  not been for a counter-charge by Major-General Sir John Vandeleur’s  light dragoon brigade and two of Dutch-Belgians from the left flank, who  had also disobeyed Wellington’s orders to stay put.
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The charge saved the remnants of the Household and Union brigades but  their casualties had been heavy, including the Greys’  lieutenant-colonel, James Hamilton, who was killed. The official  recorded losses for both brigades that day were 1,205 troopers and 1,303  horses, an extremely high proportion.
However, 14,000 French troops of D’Erlon’s corps had been committed  to the attack on the Allied centre at a cost of some 3,000 casualties  and irrecoverable time. It was four o’clock before they were ready to  advance again, by when, with the Allied line holding along the ridge and  Prussian troops beginning to arrive on the field from the east, it was  be-coming clear that Napoleon had lost the battle, although there would  be another two hours of increasingly desperate, bloody but futile French  attacks before Wellington judged it the moment to signal the whole line  to advance.
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The Scots Greys would later incorporate the image of the captured  eagle in their cap badge, and Sergeant Ewart would be commissioned as an  ensign (second lieutenant) in the 5th Veteran Battalion of Infantry.  The following year he was invited to a Waterloo dinner in Edinburgh,  where Sir Walter Scott asked him to speak. But Ensign Ewart begged that  he might be excused, saying, “I would rather fight the Battle of  Waterloo over again than face so large an assemblage.”
The Battle of Waterloo, the culmination of more than twenty years of fighting in Europe and across the globe, was one of the greatest military defeats in history. Within a matter of hours it would not only result in thousands of deaths, but also in the destruction ofa well-experienced  army.
The role  that  the  Scots  Greys  played  in  the  Battle  of  Waterloo  was, perhaps something of a surprise. Although they had had  a long and relatively distinguished history, having fought in many battles from the time of William III in Holland, the group tasked with  fighting at Waterloo, the majority having little or no battle experience, proved themselves to be more than adequate on their day. Through sheer courage and determination they entered a bloody battle against all the odds.
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Historians continue to debate whether the Scots Greys was the actual turning point of the Battle of Waterloo with as much vigour as they debate the late intervention of Blucher’s Prussians. Be that as it may it remains undeniable that the number of losses, in proportion to their numbers, was very high, yet the  impression they made on the battlefield at Waterloo was, and still is,  deep and forever remembered.
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profileperception · a month ago
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King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery.
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