Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
Fun Fact
The majority of Tumblr users, 36%, are aged 18-34, a coveted market for most companies.
#rage becomes her
hypergraphic-rhino · 8 days ago
Text
when Soraya Chemaly said “Rage became a layer of my skin.” yeah, i felt that.
0 notes
junabellesstuff · 11 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
Shelf-Confidence BPC | April 2021 | 04. Gospel Truth
"I do not wish them [women] to have power over men; but over themselves."
Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
8 notes · View notes
Quote
What if we used frustration, irritation, humiliation, anger, and other ‘negative’ feelings to be methodical and demanding? First at home, then at school, then at work. This would mean critically assessing the comforting habits we support out of nostalgia and tradition, which would require no small measure of effort. It means walking out of places of worship, not buying certain movie tickets, closing certain books and picking up others, refusing to pay for certain products, and finding compelling ways to disagree with friends and family at the dinner table. It means explaining to grandparents, engaging with school administrators, and demanding rights at work. The slow and productive burn of anger is an asset. But leveraging it means taking a risk: the risk of finding out how much what you care about matters to your community.
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, by Soraya Chemaly
1 note · View note
Quote
Looking perennially young means not looking as though we have successfully weathered life in such a way that we might have authority or have developed expertise, wisdom, and skills that are of value to us or to the people around us.
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, by Soraya Chemaly
2 notes · View notes
Quote
By naturalizing the idea that girls and women aren't angry but are sad, by insisting that they keep their anger to themselves, we render women's feelings and demands mute with little social value. When we call our anger sadness instead of anger, we often fail to acknowledge what is wrong, specifically in a way that discourages us from imagining and pursuing change. Sadness, as an emotion, is paired with acceptance. Anger, on the other hand, invokes the possibility of change and of fighting back.
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, by Soraya Chemaly
9 notes · View notes
pclysemia · 7 months ago
Quote
That anger metaphors are filled with kitchen imagery—anger simmers and smolders before reaching a boiling point; a person has to “mull things over” and “cool off”; we are supposed to “contain” or “put a lid” on our anger, or it will leave a bad “taste in the mouth”—strikes me as more than an interesting coincidence. As women, we often have to bite our tongues, eat our words, and swallow our pride. It’s almost, as one of my daughters put it, as if we are supposed to keep our anger in the kitchen.
Soraya Chemaly, Rage Becomes Her
311 notes · View notes
mooneyedandglowing · 9 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Blackout poetry using Rage Becomes Her
Wherein I use the most obnoxious "pen" possible
9 notes · View notes
virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
Text
“Anger is an assertion of rights of worth. It is communication, equality, and knowledge. It is intimacy, acceptance, fearlessness, embodiment, revolt, and reconciliation. Anger is memory and rage. It is rational thought and irrational pain. Anger is freedom, independence, expansiveness, and entitlement. It is justice, passion, clarity, and motivation. Anger is instrumental, thoughtful, complicated, and resolved. In anger, whether you like it or not, there is truth.” 
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
6 notes · View notes
virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
Text
“If you find yourself easily frustrated, irritable, and stressed, the focus of your anger is almost certainly misplaced. Flying off the handle in unpredictable ways rarely makes change or makes you feel better. Anger like this is usually a symptom of unaddressed emotions and, almost always, a history of having learned that expressing your emotions is not only bad but also makes you a bad person.”
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
7 notes · View notes
virginias-daughter · 9 months ago
Text
“Be brave enough to stop pleasing people, to be disliked, to rub people the wrong way. In many environments, all you have to do to be castigated as an angry woman is to say something out loud, so you might as well say exactly what’s bothering you and get on with it. This means that, usually, you have to come to terms with not always being likes. Your anger and assertiveness will make some people unhappy, uncomfortable, sensitive, and cautious. They will resent you, your thoughts, your words. They will hate your willingness to risk social connections and challenge social conventions. Be prepared to be labelled bitchy, humorless, difficult, a spoilsport, and a ruiner of parties, meetings, dinners, and picnics.”
– From Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly
6 notes · View notes
just0nemorepage · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women's Anger || Soraya Chemaly || 364 pages --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Top 3 Genres: Non-Fiction / Feminism / Politics
Synopsis: Women are angry, and it isn’t hard to figure out why.
We are underpaid and overworked. Too sensitive, or not sensitive enough. Too dowdy or too made-up. Too big or too thin. Sluts or prudes. We are harassed, told we are asking for it, and asked if it would kill us to smile. Yes, yes it would.
Contrary to the rhetoric of popular “self-help” and an entire lifetime of being told otherwise, our rage is one of the most important resources we have, our sharpest tool against both personal and political oppression. We’ve been told for so long to bottle up our anger, letting it corrode our bodies and minds in ways we don’t even realize. Yet our anger is a vital instrument, our radar for injustice and a catalyst for change. On the flip side, the societal and cultural belittlement of our anger is a cunning way of limiting and controlling our power.
We are so often told to resist our rage or punished for justifiably expressing it, yet how many remarkable achievements in this world would never have gotten off the ground without the kernel of anger that fueled them? Rage Becomes Her makes the case that anger is not what gets in our way, it is our way, sparking a new understanding of one of our core emotions that will give women a liberating sense of why their anger matters and connect them to an entire universe of women no longer interested in making nice at all costs.
Following in the footsteps of classic feminist manifestos like The Feminine Mystique and Our Bodies, Ourselves, Rage Becomes Her is an eye-opening book for the twenty-first century woman: an engaging, accessible credo offering us the tools to re-understand our anger and harness its power to create lasting positive change.
Publication Date: September 2018. / Average Rating: 4.37. / Number of Ratings: 2850~.
4 notes · View notes
rakastiikeri · a year ago
Text
The most dangerous man a woman will encounter is the one sitting at her own dinner table, yet media continue to focus on horrific crimes perpetrated by strangers and acquaintances. This violence should be treated seriously in and of itself, but it is also meaningful to understanding public violence. The single most accurate predictor of violent crime is a man’s felony domestic violence conviction. For instance, 58 percent of mass shooters have histories of domestic violence. Nine of the ten most lethal mass killings in the United States involved men with histories of domestic abuse. Three of the deadlier mass shootings of 2017—one in Plano, Texas, in which seven were killed, another in which eight people died in rural Mississippi, and a third in which twenty-seven were killed in Sutherland Springs, Texas—were committed by estranged husbands enraged that their wives had chosen to end their marriages. Killings like these are not considered political or terroristic, even though in effect they are both. 
— Soraya Chemaly, Chapter 6: Smile, Baby, Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger
707 notes · View notes
literarysewerrat · a year ago
Video
1 note · View note
literarysewerrat · a year ago
Quote
Anger at injustice is one part of what motivates me. But it is not a sustainable emotion in and of itself. It has to be transformed into a deep love for the possibility of who we can be. Anger can be a catalyst, but we cannot function on anger alone. When it's not used properly, it can quickly become destructive. That's why love is important: love connects us to what we most care about; what we yearn for.
Alicia Garza.
18 notes · View notes
literarysewerrat · a year ago
Quote
We are so busy teaching girls too be likeable that we often forget to teach them, as we do boys, that they should be respected.
Rage Becomes Her. Soraya Chemaly.
5 notes · View notes
lulacarson · a year ago
Quote
So what? This is life; get over it. The problem is too big. There are more serious issues. Besides, it's puritanical to critique sexualization. Girls are embracing their own bodies, and they get positive feedback when they post sexy photos and report a sense of worthiness associated with that feedback. It's empowering, pleasing, mutual and consensual. Any wet-blanket critiques are slut-shamey and unpleasantly bitter. Anyway, men are also being objectified now. In fact, what is pleasing and instills a sense of control in girls and women isn't sexualization, but the power it brings. Studies show that the positive emotions experienced by women who self-sexualize in social media, for example, are not actually correlated to the degree of self-sexualization but to a specific motivation: being admired, attracting attention - the likes and followers of social media. Those are symbols of influence and status.  That is a far more accurate reflection of what women are reporting, as is the fact that sexualization remains the most available, albeit very narrow, path to power for girls. Power and empowerment are not the same. Neither are sexual objectification and sexuality, which are often confused. And pretending that men are affected by objectification the same way women are, is just that: a pretense. Women don't own the media and marketing companies that profit from their images, and they don't lead the religious and educational institutions that dictate what constitutes obscenity - currently considered inherent in naked women's bodies. Men can opt out of sexualization if they choose, but women, given history, have few options.
Soraya Chemaly, Rage Becomes Her.
8 notes · View notes
throwingsuns · a year ago
Text
Furia hasta casi ver rojo,
Te lo dije alguna vez,
Sos una de las pocas personas que me despierta una violencia brutal,
Hasta incluso poder visualizar el impacto.
A vos en un punto te encanta despertar ese sentimiento nefasto en la gente,
Eso quiere decir que no le sos indiferente,
El odio es proporcional al amor,
La violencia es proporcional al deseo sexual.
Un poco de autocritica nunca, no?
Hay que mostrarle al mundo el carismatico, semental y despreocupado.
Cuando la realidad se asemeja mucho mas a lo contrario.
Convertire mi furia en algo productivo
Y vos seguiras echando culpas a diestra y siniestra sin un rastro de evolucion
La furia se convierte en pena, lastima...
Throwingsuns
Tumblr media
1 note · View note
lulacarson · a year ago
Quote
In the end, faced with yet another morning of Destructo Boy and his parents, I broke my own rule about not interfering with disciplining other people's children. I knelt down and looked the boy in the eye. I asked him to stay at least an arm's length away from my daughter and her castle forever. I explained that it was important to respect her work and listen to her words. If he felt like gleefully destroying a tower, I said, he could always build his own. He confirmed that he understood, and he didn't [destroy her castle] again. It worked, but using my status as an adult did nothing to contribute to my daughter's sense of her control over her environment or her knowledge that her feelings and rights deserved to be socially respected and validated. In the traditional way, I was perpetuating a sort of ignorance around anger. (...) What I wish I had taught my daughter in that moment was that she had every right to be angry, and subsequently demand that the adults around her pay attention to that anger. Only then can she feel she has the right to make demands on the world.
Rage Becomes Her, Soraya Chemaly
3 notes · View notes
luxe-pauvre · a year ago
Quote
Anger and power are always entangled. Women are just as motivated by the desire for power as men; it’s just that our cultural ideas about power don’t associate it with femininity. If you are a girl or woman, chances are you have grown up unwittingly associating ideas about power with masculinity. Our primary roles as caretakers make the idea of power, associated as it often is with masculine behaviours like competition, conflicting. Power is, for example, associated in implicit bias studies with domination and not nurturing. Powerlessness is, on the other hand, implied in femininity.
Soraya Chemaly, Rage Becomes Her
120 notes · View notes