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#nineteenth century
viktor-sbor · a day ago
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Exquisitely Carved Chariot of Srivilliputhur Andal Temple, Tamil Nadu, India in 1868
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historybizarre · a day ago
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The Victorian Knitting Manuals collection from the the University of Southampton’s Knitting Reference Library can now be found on JSTOR. JSTOR Daily interviewed librarian Catherine Polley about the collection.
JSTOR: Could someone today who was, say, stuck inside during a pandemic, pick up one of these manuals and learn to knit from them?
Polley: The short answer is no! They provided a general sense of a pattern but you would need to know how to work around them in order to complete. So, as was the case then and still is now, you would need to already be a skilled knitter. In addition some of the notation was notoriously difficult to follow. It is worth checking out Jane Gaugain’s work, for example, Mrs Gaugain’s minature knitting netting and crochet book from 1843 pages 8-9 to fully appreciate the complexity before instructions were standardized.
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Agnes Peterson - women in history (32/?)
San Francisco became a center for printing and publishing in the nineteenth century. While there was a great demand for printers, women were largely kept out of desirable typesetting positions in the 1850's and 1860's by giving them lower wages, fewer opportunities and an all-male union. In 1868, mrs Agnes Peterson and other trained female typesetters founded one of the first woman-owned printing business in San Francisco: Women's Co-Operative Printing Union, so they could create their own opportunities.
Literature: Patricia Keats, "Women in printing & publishing in California, 1850-1940", California History 77, nr 2 (1998): 93-97.
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twigoftetbury · 5 days ago
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Nineteenth century Indian model of Indian temples carved and constructed out of pith. Pith is found in the central cylinder of tissue found inside the stem of most flowering plants. This has a glass case that sits on its wooden base.
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Florence Nightingale - women in history (31/?)
Florence Nightingale, also known as the Lady with the Lamp, was born on May 12, 1820 in Florence (Italy). She is a British nurse, statistician and social reformer. She is the foundational philospher of modern nursing. Her birthday is the International Nurses Day.
Born to a wealthy and well-connected British family in Italy, Florence and her family moved back to England in 1821. Her parents raised their children with a liberal-humanitarian outlook on life. Her father educated the children and Florence displayed from an early age an extraordinary ability for collecting and analysing data.
While her family didn't want Florence to become a nurse, she was eventually able to enroll at the Institution of Protestant Deaconesses at Kaiserswerth (Germany) for two weeks of training in July 1850 and again for three months in July 1851. Here, she learned the basics of nursing skills. In 1853, Florence broke free from her family environment and became the superintendent of the Institution for Sick Gentlewomen in Distressed Circumstances in London. Here, she showed her ability to be an administrator by improving nursing care, working conditions and overal efficiency in the hospital.
In the Crimean War (1853), the hospitals for the British troops were primarily established in Scutari (Üsküdar). The first modern war correspondent Wiliam Howard Russel reported on the care of the wounded soldiers which was incompetent and ineffective. This caused an outcry from the British public. Florence was appointed to lead a group of nurses to Scutari and left in October 1854 with a group of 38 women. She was however not welcomed by the medical officers, while the situation in the hospitals was very bad. She called it the Kingdom of Hell. Florence improved the situation tremendously. She introduced basic necessties such as bathing, clean clothing, adequate food, attention for psychological needs and even educational and recreational activities. Florence often wandered the wards at night, supporting the patients. This earned her the name Lady with the Lamp.
While most people remembered Florence for her accomplishments during the Crimean War, her greatest achievements might actually be her attempts to create social reform in health care and nursing. Her most famous publication Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not, improved the health of households because the publication provided direction on how to care for the sick. Florence was the first woman to receive the Order of Merit. When she died, her family declined the offer of a state funeral, as requested by Florence.
Literature: Attewell, Alex. "Florence Nightingale (1820–1910)." Prospects 28.1 (1998): 151-166.
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pintoras · 5 days ago
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Antonietta Brandeis (Czech, 1848 - 1926): On a Venetian backwater (via Bonhams)
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tidewatergone · 6 days ago
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Brock Farm, Quarters, Nimmo (Virginia Beach), Virginia. HABS photo, Library of Congress (HABS VA,77-NIM.V,2--1)
From 1933/41 HABS survey:
"Date of erection: C. 1793
"Present condition: Ruinous
"Description: This is an example of a plank house frequently seen farther west in Virginia and North Carolina but unusual, if not unique, in Princess Anne. It was partially unroofed in the storm of 1933 and, when visited in 1933, had not been repaired. The building is one-story high with a loft in the gable roof. All walls are of planks about three inches thick. These were probably sawn. At the ends they are dovetailed together. The plank walls rest on a brick foimdation wall, laid in Flemish bond. There was evidently never a framed floor, the earth probably having been tainped to an even surface. It should be noted that the sill piece that rests on the brickwork is deeply worn at the door where people have stepped on or across it to the floor below."
This is a fascinating structure. Note the exposed dovetails on the far left planks, and the exposed roof structure (no ridgepole or posts, and temporary bracing on the damaged section). Log or plank building techniques weren't unknown in the Tidewater region, but they don't seem to have been terribly common. Most often they were used for outbuildings and accessory structures, many of which don't survive very long past the point where they aren't being actively used. This is a (now-gone) remnant of the landscape of slavery in Virginia, the kind of structure that would not have been considered worthy of preservation by many people who encountered it in the 20th century. Thankfully the HABS surveyor, Thomas Waterman, thought it was worthy of recording, so we have this image.
Most of the 18th and early 19th-century buildings that remain in Virginia today are the high-style/high-quality (read: attractive and durable) houses built by the slave-owning elite. Nice things tend to survive longer; they have a "keep me" factor that utilitarian things may lack. In the context of American history, that means the big, fancy houses where white slaveholders lived are generally preserved, while the buildings where enslaved people labored and the quarters where they lived are allowed to crumble and rot away (or are deliberately demolished).
The problem with this phenomenon is it leaves out the full story of all the (mostly enslaved) people who lived and labored to support those elite landowners. A landscape empty of all but the "big house" is an incomplete picture, the kind of picture that is still inappropriately romanticized as the "Old South," where the unpleasant bits are conveniently ignored or minimized as desired. History has to be taken with all the bad bits and uncomfortable truths in order to carry an honest meaning. The same goes for historic landscapes and places. (White) People need to see the quarters and outbuildings next to the plantation houses in order to understand the big picture of what was going on in these landscapes.
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Lorenz Frölich -  Le Docteur Ox, 1874 Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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Lorenz Frölich -  Woman and Child by a Duck Pond,  between 1835 and 1903, pen and ink Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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Lorenz Frölich -  Mother Watching Over Two Young Children Playing (recto); Baby in a Bassinet (verso),  between 1835 and 1903, pen and ink Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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Lorenz Frölich - Child in a Crib, between 1835 and 1903, pen and ink Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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Lorenz Frölich - Child Climbing a Chair to Reach for a Kitten,  between 1835 and 1903 pen and ink Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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Lorenz Frölich - A Mother and Two Children Playing Blind Man's Bluff,  between 1835 and 1903, pen and ink Lorenz Frölich (1820 – 1908) was a Danish painter, illustrator, and printmaker. Frölich was particularly interested in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscape. He is best remembered most for his children's books which included illustrations of the fairy tales told by Hans Christian Andersen as well as Frölich's own books about his daughter Lily (or Edma).   Frölich was born in Copenhagen, Denmark and was the son of a wholesaler. He studied in Copenhagen under painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, in Dresden under fresco painter Eduard Julius Bendemann (1843-1846), and in Paris under historical painter Thomas Couture (1852-1853). Frölich was influenced in impressionism through friendships with Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Alfred Stevens. Frölich developed a close friendship with John Thomas Lundbye. They shared an interest in Nordic sagas and the Danish landscapes. The two travelled through Denmark together and worked collaboratively on illustrations. Frölich lived for many in Paris and Rome where he exhibited his works at the salons. He also travelled much through Europe, visiting Germany (1840-1844), Italy (1846-1851), Denmark (1854-57) and London (1870-1871). In 1855, he married Carolina Charlotta in de Betou. Their daughter, Edma Frølich (1859–1958), grew up to became an artist drawing portraits and painting still lives. In 1877, Frölich was appointed professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Art, Copenhagen.
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pintoras · 16 days ago
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Marianne von Eschenburg (Austrian, 1856 - 1942): Professor Alexander Kolisko (via Belvedere)
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welcome-joke · 17 days ago
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Via dalla pazza folla - Dai Lumi all'800
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