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#kim stanley robinson
valencing · 4 days ago
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“‘If things feel’ like this or that: these feelings too are linked to periodization, because our feelings are not just biological but also social and cultural and therefore historical. Raymond Williams called this cultural shaping a “structure of feeling,” and this is a very useful concept for trying to comprehend differences in cultures through time. Of course as mammals we feel emotions that are basic and constant: fear, anger, hope, love. But we comprehend these biological emotions by way of language, thereby organizing them into systems of emotions that are different in different cultures and over time. Thus for instance, famously, romantic love means different things in different cultures at different times; consider Ancient Greece, China, medieval Europe, anywhere. 
“So how you feel about your time is partly or even largely a result of that time’s structure of feeling. When time passes and that structure changes, how you feel will also change––both in your body and in how you understand it as a meaning. Say the order of your time feels unjust and unsustainable and yet massively entrenched, but also falling apart before your eyes. The obvious contradictions in this list might yet still describe the feeling of your time quite accurately, if we are not mistaken. Or put it this way; it feels that way to us. But a little contemplation of history will reveal that this feeling too will not last for long. Unless of course the feeling of things falling apart is itself massively entrenched, to the point of being the eternal or eternally recurrent individual human’s reaction to history. Which may just mean the reinscription of the biological onto the historical, for we are all definitely always falling apart, and not massively entrenched in anything at all.”
-Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry for the Future
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I closed my eyes and the wind touched my cheek, it breathed through all the needles on all the branches of all the trees, and said oh, mmmmmmm.  Have you heard the sound of wind in pine trees—I mean really listened to it, as to the voice of a friend? There’s nothing so soothing. It put me in a trance more like sleep than anything else, though I still heard. Each buffet or slacking shifted the hum or whoosh or roar of it; sometimes it was like the sound of a big waterfall around the bend, other times like the waves on the beach—still again, like a thousand folk in the far distance, singing oh  as deep and wild as they could. Occasional bird calls tweeted through the sound, but mostly it was all that could be heard. The wind, the wind, oh.  It was enough to fill the ear forever. I didn’t want to hear any other voice.
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Wild Shore
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Has it ever occurred to you that other people see you in the same way you see them, as a collection of appearances and habits and actions and words—that they never get to see your thoughts, to know how wonderful you really are? So that you seem as strange to them as they all appear to you?
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Wild Shore
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swampcrystal · 7 days ago
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by Kim Stanley Robinson, 'The Blind Geometer'
(cover by Peter Gudynas; c. 1987)
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angrynebula · 18 days ago
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will never get over the fact that author kim stanley robinson lives like a five minute walk from me, and i’ve been at a community bonfire with him, and this is a facebook post from my jr high history teacher, and i’ve read one book by him and didn’t like it. truly tragic
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thegeekanthropologist · 19 days ago
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The Death of Outer Space Dreams: Hard Decisions and a War of Utopian Demands
The Death of Outer Space Dreams: Hard Decisions and a War of Utopian Demands
By Savannah Mandel Sometimes we have to make tough decisions as adults. That’s what I’m learning as I enter my mid-twenties. Maybe you’re debating between becoming a vegetarian so as not to support cruel and capitalist meat industries and savoring exotic cuisines sourced from god-only-knows-where. Maybe you’re deciding whether to pay off your ever-growing credit card debt or to take a vacation…
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irradiate-space · 28 days ago
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This is a neat exploration of what the plot of Andy Weir's novel/film The Martian would look like if its mission was built on SpaceX's Starship architecture. It's a very different story, and the problems are much different.
It makes me want to write a version of KSR's Red Mars that is based around this model.
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english-ness · 28 days ago
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And so one morning, the sun rises, shooting long rays through the ragged cloud cover, up the length of Valles Marineris. On the north walls are tiny traces of black and yellow and olive and gray and green. Specks of lichen dot the vertical faces of stone, which stand as they always have, stony, and cracked, and red ; but now speckled, as if with mold.
Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars, Part 4: Homesick (p.205)
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patrickbrianmooney · a month ago
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He returned to discoursing with Maya about the life cycle of sand crabs. Ann had met him before; a year or so he had scarcely been talking, just simple phrases like Tati and Nanao's, Fishie! Mine! and now he was a pedant. The way language came to children was incredible. They were all geniuses at that age, it took adults years and years to twist them down into the bonsai creatures they eventually became. Who would dare to do that, who would dare deform this natural child? No one, and yet it got done. No one did it and everyone did it.
Kim Stanley Robinson, Blue Mars, part 14 (p. 757 in ISBN 978-0553573350)
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patrickbrianmooney · a month ago
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So she was a new Ann now. Not the counter-Ann, nor even that shadowy third person who had haunted her for so long. A new Ann. A fully Martian Ann at last. On a brown Mars of some new kind, red, green, blue, all swirled together. And if there was a Terran Ann still in there, cowering in a lost quantum closet of her own, that was life. No scar was ever fully lost until death and the final dissolution, and that was perhaps the way it should be; one wouldn't want to lose too much, or it would be trouble of a different kind. A balance had to be kept. And here, now, she was the Martian Ann, not issei any longer, but an elderly new native, a Terran-born yonsei. Martian Ann Clayborne, in the moment and the only moment. It felt good to lie there.
Kim Stanley Robinson, Blue Mars, part 14 (p. 754 in ISBN 978-0553573350)
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fuehairtransplantblog · a month ago
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New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson
New York 2140 – Kim Stanley Robinson
Download New York 2140 – Kim Stanley Robinson ebook NOMINATED FOR THE HUGO AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2018 ‘A towering novel’ – Guardian ‘Relevant and essential’ – Bloomberg Businessweek As the sea level rose, every street became a canal, every skyscraper an island. For the residents of one apartment building in Madison Square, however, New York in the year 2140 is far from a drowned city. New York…
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patrickbrianmooney · a month ago
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In a way it was comforting; human behavior not as irreducibly evil or stupid, but as responding, semirationally, to a given historical situation, a danger. Seizing what one could, with the notion that there might not be enough for all; doing everything possible to protect one's offspring; which of course endangered all offspring, by the aggregate of individual selfish actions. But at least it could be called an attempt at reason, a first approximation.
Kim Stanley Robinson, Blue Mars, part 9 (p. 427 in ISBN 978-0553573350)
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dentesguardados · a month ago
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So how you feel about your time is partly or even largely a result of that time’s structure of feeling. When time passes and that structure changes, how you feel will also change— both in your body and in how you understand it as a meaning. Say the order of your time feels unjust and unsustainable and yet massively entrenched, but also falling apart before your eyes. The obvious contradictions in this list might yet still describe the feeling of your time quite accurately, if we are not mistaken. Or put it this way; it feels that way to us. But a little contemplation of history will reveal that this feeling too will not last for long. Unless of course the feeling of things falling apart is itself massively entrenched, to the point of being the eternal or eternally recurrent individual human’s reaction to history. Which may just mean the reinscription of the biological onto the historical, for we are all definitely always falling apart, and not massively entrenched in anything at all.
Kim Stanley Robinson, The Ministry of the Future
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