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#hal sirowitz
apoemaday · 29 days ago
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Lending Out Books
by Hal Sirowitz
You’re always giving, my therapist said. You have to learn how to take. Whenever you meet a woman, the first thing you do is lend her your books. You think she’ll have to see you again in order to return them. But what happens is, she doesn’t have the time to read them, & she’s afraid if she sees you again you’ll expect her to talk about them, & will want to lend her even more. So she cancels the date. You end up losing a lot of books. You should borrow hers.
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dunkelwort · 4 months ago
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The Manhattan Review - Volume 19, no. 2
The Manhattan Review – Volume 19, no. 2
«The Manhattan Review», Philip Fried editor, vol. 19, n.2, 2020. In this issue: D. Nurkse, Philip Gross, Nicola Vulpe, John Burnside, Erich Fried, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, Christopher Bursk, Marc Kaminsky, Cheryl Moskowitz, Kate Farrell, John Greening, Penelope Shuttle, Claire Malroux, George Szirtes, Chris McCabe, Richard Hoffman, Carol Rumens, Rosalind Hudis, Menno Wigman, Howard Altmann,…
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sohamar · 8 months ago
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Hal Sirowitz - Barátnő családi vacsorán
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Nagyon szép lány, mondta anya, De el fog hagyni. Beszélt a jövőről, És te nem voltál benne, kértem, Mondja el még egyszer, hátha Véletlenül kifelejtett, De a második változatban sem voltál benne. Mondta, hova fog iskolába járni, és amikor Kérdeztem, mit visz magával, Megemlítette a kabátját, a csizmáját, De téged nem. Mondta, hogy mindig nagyon kedvelt, De így szoktak beszélni arról a kiskutyáról is, Amit végül elajándékoznak.
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richglinnen · 11 months ago
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Mirror
I read different poets, Get inspired & imitate them. So, no, I’m not eclectic, Not diverse. I’m a mirror &, for now, Hal Sirowitz.
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Image: Duotrope logo Duotrope®
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Editor Interview: Certain Circuits Magazine
Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.
A: Cross-genre collaborative
Submit to: certaincircuits@gmail.com
Reopening as of 2020 for new content
Interview: Bonnie MacAllister, Curator/Founding Editor on 19 January 2014
Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?
A: Esque, Helix, Paper Tiger Media, Australian Poetry, nth Position, Toronto Quarterly, Grasp, Rufous City Review, Hoax, Parlour, Classwar Karaoke, RHINO Magazine, Tom Tom
Q: If you publish writing, who are your favorite writers? If you publish art, who are your favorite artists?
A: Fiction: Aimee Bender, Jeanette Winterson, Wole Soyinka, Clarice Lispector, Dinaw Mengestu
Poetry: Tanure Ojaide, Adrienne Rich, Hal Sirowitz, June Nandy, Tamara Oakman, Aja Beech, Nina Sharma-Jones
Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?
A: We encourage collaboration and cross-genre work between our authors and artists. We publish on a tumblr site so that the work is interactive. We stage exhibitions and film screenings in conjunction with our book launch readings. We curate based upon what we find to be the finest work.
Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?
A: While Certain Circuits publishes individual artists working in one genre, we encourage our contributors to submit in more than one genre or to submit with a collaborator. We often accept poems and other contributors become the illustrators or participate in a reverse ekphrasis. We encourage film submissions that fuse text and visual poetry, and we will often publish film stills in our annual print volume. We are moved by stunning language, audio, visual, stills, and motion graphics.
Q: Describe the ideal submission.
A: We received a collaboration from two poets, both of whom were also visual artists. Each chose to illustrate the poem of the other. The submissions were well crafted and the language precise and striking. This is a fine example of an ideal submission, but we welcome this type of collaboration in any genre.
Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?
A: The submissions that do not make it in are often not ready for editorial eyes, use simple language that is not precise or well crafted, use hate speech or a threatening persona, employ moving graphics that are not well edited or rendered, or present images that are not well developed.
Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?
A: We will print a 50 word bio so please do not send information beyond that limit. We would love to hear how you have collaborated with other writers and artists. You are always welcome to send us a link to your website.
Q: If you publish writing, how much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?
A: We do our best to read every piece. If a piece contains hate speech or threats, we may not read the entire submission before discarding it. We have decided not to respond to the pieces we reject. We'd rather silently, politely decline.
Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go through before it is accepted?
A: Several eyes read the submitted pieces. We evaluate based on criteria of quality and whether or not the work is collaborative. We publish several collaborations per issue so these are placed first along with the strongest texts.
Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you?
A: Our editors collaborate mostly via email. We will meet most often around issue deadlines. We may see each other more than that around issue launch times or when we are teaching collaborative writing classes at area non-profits and bookstores.
Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?
A: We publish e-books and video anthologies. We are thrilled to be included in databases of journals, and we collaborate with other journals through our on-line exchanges and by sharing their news. For us, technology aids the collaborative process through our contributor's ability to share audio, video, graphic, and game elements.
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funituregonewrong · a year ago
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Chopped Off Arm / No More Birthdays - Hal Sirowitz 
Former Poet Laureate of Queens, NY
MTV Spoken Word
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poem-today · 2 years ago
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A poem by Hal Sirowitz
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Lending Out Books
You’re always giving, my therapist said. You have to learn how to take. Whenever you meet a woman, the first thing you do is lend her your books. You think she’ll have to see you again in order to return them. But what happens is, she doesn’t have the time to read them, & she’s afraid if she sees you again you’ll expect her to talk about them, & will want to lend her even more. So she cancels the date. You end up losing a lot of books. You should borrow hers.
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Hal Sirowitz
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missedstations · 3 years ago
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“Why There Are No More Miracles” - Hal Sirowitz
God would perform miracles in the old days, Father said, but nowadays if he set a bush on fire, like he did for Moses, the fire department would rush to put it out. The newspapers would send our photographers. There’d be an investigation. A reward would be given to help find the arsonist. Some innocent person would get blamed. God has enough people believing in him. Why does He need all that commotion for the sake of a few more?
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exceptindreams · 3 years ago
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Why There Are No More Miracles | Hal Sirowitz
“Why There Are No More Miracles” Hal Sirowitz
God would perform miracles in the old days, Father said, but nowadays if he set a bush on fire, like he did for Moses, the fire department would rush to put it out. The newspapers would send our photographers. There’d be an investigation. A reward would be given to help find the arsonist. Some innocent person would get blamed. God has enough people believing in him. Why does He need all that commotion for the sake of a few more?
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exceptindreams · 4 years ago
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Reusing Words | Hal Sirowitz
"Reusing Words" Hal Sirowitz Don't think you know everything, Father said, just because you're good with words. They aren't everything. I try to say the smallest amount possible. Instead of using them indiscriminately I try to conserve them. I'm the only one in this household who recycles them. I say the same thing over & over again, like "Who forgot to turn out the lights? Who forgot to clean up after themselves in the bathroom?" Since you don't listen I never have to think of other things to say.
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Serenade
Vi satt så tett sammen på t-banen
at en politimann kom bort til oss,
tok fram batongen,
plasserte den under haken sin som en fiolin
& lot som om han spilte en serenade for oss.
Det var det året vi elsket hverandre så høyt
at han kunne arrestert oss for det.
- Hal Sirowitz, “Sa mor” (norsk ved Erlend Loe)
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osabordopecado1 · 4 years ago
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Hal Sirowitz
in Como Eles Costumam Dizer
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osabordopecado1 · 4 years ago
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Hal Sirowitz
in Como Eles Costumam Dizer
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Lending Out Books
You’re always giving, my therapist said.
You have to learn to take. Whenever
you meet a woman, the first thing you do
is lend her your books. You think she’ll 
have to see you again in order to return them.
But what happens is, she doesn’t have the time
to read them, & she’s afraid if she sees you again
you’ll expect her to talk about them, & will
want to lend her even more. So she 
cancels the date. You end up losing 
a lot of books. You should borrow hers. 
-Hal Sirowitz
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missedstations · 4 years ago
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“The Joke That Got No Laughs” - Hal Sirowitz
You should have enough courtesy to laugh after I tell a joke, Father said, even if you don’t find it funny. You might find it funny later. It’s like you’re giving me your laughter in advance. You shouldn’t be asking me to tell you where the punch line was. It’s always at the end & my joke was no exception. I apologize if I didn’t tell it as well as I had heard it. Or maybe it was the audience that was at fault. You just didn’t get it. It might have been too low brow. Maybe I should just find another family to tell it to. I chose mine because of the convenience. But I might have done better if I had told it next door.
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exceptindreams · 5 years ago
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The Joke That Got No Laughs | Hal Sirowitz
“The Joke That Got No Laughs" Hal Sirowitz
You should have enough courtesy to laugh after I tell a joke, Father said, even if you don't find it funny. You might find it funny later. It's like you're giving me your laughter in advance. You shouldn't be asking me to tell you where the punch line was. It's always at the end & my joke was no exception. I apologize if I didn't tell it as well as I had heard it. Or maybe it was the audience that was at fault. You just didn't get it. It might have been too low brow. Maybe I should just find another family to tell it to. I chose mine because of the convenience. But I might have done better if I had told it next door.
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osabordopecado1 · 5 years ago
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Museu
Vasculhei as tuas coisas como um detective. Tentei descobrir porque deixaste de gostar de mim. Não conseguia reduzir a um só motivo.
Uma das minhas gavetas está cheia de tralha tua. Eu queria arranjar um apartamento maior, e ter um quarto só para ti. Iria tornar-se numa espécie de museu. A tua ausência iria estar em exposição.
A tua fotografia está no armário. Está ao lado dos livros que li, e que não tenciono reler.
-- Hal Sirowitz
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exceptindreams · 5 years ago
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Fun, Fun, Fun When the Guy Goes Away | Hal Sirowitz
“Fun, Fun, Fun When the Guy Goes Away” Hal Sirowitz
That's a strange question to ask a woman at a bar, she said. "Are you having fun?" If I wanted to have fun I wouldn't have come here. This is a lot of work. I have to decide which guy, out of all the jerks here, has the potential of becoming my future husband. I mostly just have looks to go on, since the conversation is usually minimal—like the one we're having now.
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poetryshoebox · 5 years ago
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I Finally Managed to Speak to Her
She was sitting across from me on the bus. I said, "The trees look so much greener in this part of the country. In New York City everything looks so drab." She said, "It looks the same to me. Show me a tree that's different." "That one," I said. "Which one?" she said. "It's too late," I said; "we already passed it." "When you find another one," she said, "let me know." And then she went back to reading her book.
-Hal Sirowitz
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