Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
Fun Fact
The name Tumblr is derived from "Tumblelogs", which were hand coded multimedia blogs.
#ed kramer
cosmicgreens · 7 days ago
Text
These are a few of my favorite things
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
"You learn that everyone else out there is a me, as well. You're being someone else, and when you return to your own world, you're going to be slightly changed."
- Neil Gaiman, Why Our Future Depends on Libraries, Reading and Daydreaming: The Reading Agency Lecture, 2013
The Sandman: Book of Dreams (1996)
Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders (2006)
Stardust (1999)
Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990)
Coraline (2002)
Stories: All-New Tales (2008)
32 notes · View notes
oneangrygamer · a year ago
Text
Former Dragon Con Owner, Edward Kramer, Charged For Possessing Child Porn
Former Dragon Con Owner, Edward Kramer, Charged For Possessing Child Porn | #WeebWars
Former owner and co-founder of Dragon Con, Edward E. Kramer, was charged with possession of child pornography again. This comes after an investigation into Kramer et al for attempting to hack the court’s computers. (more…)
View On WordPress
0 notes
graphicpolicy · 2 years ago
Text
DragonCon co-founder Ed Kramer Accused of Taking Picture of a 7-year old
DragonCon co-founder Ed Kramer Accused of Taking Picture of a 7-year old #dragoncon
DragonCon co-founder Ed Kramer is in trouble again with the law and is accused of taking a picture of a 7-year-old in a doctor’s office.
Kramer is a convicted child molester and in the past was sentenced to five years of house arrests on three counts of child molestation. He was released in December. Due to his conviction and his being a sex offender, the photos are illegal.
Authorities…
View On WordPress
0 notes
sonnymoonmusic · 7 years ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Anna Wise + Ed Kramer art! You might recognize his stuff from our album covers. you can order prints at kramerart.net 
9 notes · View notes
I’m just gonna put this out there because there are a lot of people that are being somewhat misinformed by some of those professionals and attendees boycotting Dragon*con. The investigation of Ed Kramer, the founder of Dragon*Con, for sexual crimes against children has been happening for 10 years without much media coverage. People are only becoming more aware of it now because it is finally going to trial. From the moment that the investigation began, current Dragon*Con officials have done everything in their power to completely break ties with Kramer. He is currently only a stockholder and is not in any way affiliated with the convention beyond that. He doesn’t contribute in any way to the planning, organization, or management of the con and hasn’t for the last 10 years. Dragoncon has attempted several times to buy our his stock in order to cut ties completely. They have contacted lawyers in an effort to force him out of his options, and have been told there isn’t much they can do until he voluntarily sells. They have released several public statements about this over the past several years. So, yes, the money made by Dragon*con is going to help support a child molester. There’s no denying that. However, it would still be a stretch to say that the con has a child molester “in their ranks”. I support those who are boycotting the con. It is completely understandable to me that people do not want to in any way put money in the pocket of a man who has committed such a heinous crime. However, I also support those who have decided to continue to go in support of the staff and organizers and stockholders who hold the event because they love the fans and love the fandoms. Follow your conscience, stay informed, and be kind to one another.
0 notes
bonestar-blog · 7 years ago
Text
Please educate yourself about all facets of the Ed Kramer issue before judging Dragon*Con attendees.
There are multiple factors to this case. This post explains everything to a great degree:
http://elfgrove.tumblr.com/post/42488318281
1 note · View note
colewardell · 9 years ago
Conversation
Always be different, even when you're the same
"No story is exactly the same twice," observes a figment with paper lips. "Even written down and printed in a book."
"Everything is the same as itself," says another in a dry, whiskery voice. "That's the way it is, man."
"It's not the same story because you're not the same person," says the first figment.
— The Sandman: Book of Dreams (edited by Neil Gaiman and Ed Kramer)
23 notes · View notes
gunsforeyes · 9 years ago
Text
Frustration.
So I bought this book: 
It's a book of short stories based on The Sandman, one of the best graphic novels I have ever read. I've been looking for this book in stores for over a year, and I've finally found it. Suffice it to say, I'm very excited.
So I open it up and the preface is by someone with whom I'm not familiar, Frank McConnell. And right away he says (forgive me for the long quote):
"...humankind can no more live without gods than you can kill yourself by holding your breath. (Of course, you just may be the kind of arrant rationalist who huffs that modern man has finally freed himself from ancient enslavement to superstition, fantasy, and awe. If so, return this book immediately to its place of purchase for a refund; and, by the by, don't bother trying to read Shakespeare, Homer, Faulkner, or, for that matter, Dr. Seuss.) We need gods-- Thor or Zeus or Krishna or Jesus, or, well, God-- not so much to worship or sacrifice to, but because they satisfy our need-- distinctive from that of all other animals-- to imagine a meaning, a sense to our lives, to satisfy our hunger to believe that the muck and chaos of daily existence does, after all, tend somewhere. It's the origin of religion, and also of storytelling-- or aren't they both the same thing? As Voltaire said of God: if he did not exist, it would have been necessary to invent him."
And later:
"It's often been said by literary critics that our age is impoverished by its inability to believe in anything save the cold equations of science."
Christ. (Excuse the pun.) Spare me, Mr. McConnell.
One of the things I love and admire about Neil Gaiman is his fondness and respect for mythology. His work is heavily influenced by it, but no one really knows his personal beliefs. He wishes people a Merry Christmas, a Happy Solstice, but never disrespects nonbelievers. He is a gentle sort (despite what his characters may have you think), and would never write something so hateful and science-negative to introduce a book. It sets a terrible tone, and it was impossible to get it out of my head when I was trying to read the first (very pleasant) story.
Listen, Mr. McConnell. I'm an atheist, and I love mythology. LOVE it. I think taken too far, it can certainly be harmful, but we'll not get into that. I love the stories of Greek mythology, I love the Norse tales, I am just now learning about Hindu gods and goddesses and it is fascinating and beautiful. No one's trying to take away your, or anyone's, right to believe what they want. But you have to accept that I, and many others, live without gods daily, and we make our own meaning in our lives. Certainly, we indulge in fantasy. We watch movies, read books (why do you think I love Sandman so goddamn much?), and write our own fantasy. 
Science doesn't take away your meaning. It doesn't take away love, or beauty, or awe. Many people would argue that it adds to it, magnifies it. It teaches us where we came from, how we began. It doesn't limit us the way you seem to think. These "cold equations" were discovered, invented, pored over by human beings passionate about the world and each other, overjoyed by each new discovery, each new breakthrough in understanding. 
I do think humanity has freed itself from "enslavement" (your choice of words) to ancient gods and rituals. I think we now have so much information about the world around us that we don't need the explanations they give us. But you are always free to choose. Everyone is always free to choose.
You say yourself that gods are just more stories. "'In the beginning God made man?' Quite-- and quite precisely-- the reverse."
Humans created these wondrous gods you speak of. Thus, humans created their own meaning, the meaning you say the gods gave us. Then, aren't our own minds, the ones capable of such fascinating feats, more worthy of study than their creations?
0 notes