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#douglas mackinnon
fuckyeahgoodomens · a month ago
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The readthrough script from of episode one from 11th September 2017 - notice how David’s and Michael’s signatures have horns and a halo :)
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fuckyeahgoodomens · a month ago
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From the DVD commentary, episode 1:
Douglas: I remember though, this was - happily in the scheduling terms - it was one of the last scenes that we shot with David and Michael. Which is the right time to shoot such a scene, an opening scene, because they'd know their characters inside out.
Neil: Yes, they knew who they were and they played all of the subtext and they’re glorious. Of course, poor David is up there in a desert with the wind blowing with giant contact lenses on.
Douglas: And with sand wanting to get into every pore of his eye.
Neil: And he said, 'That was the hardest day of all shooting'.
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ineffablekink · 5 months ago
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The fans: Sooooo, Season 2?
Neil&co: We have no idea what you’re talking about 👀
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contraststudies · 5 months ago
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Highlights from the Ineffable Con 2 panel with Neil Gaiman, Douglas Mackinnon and Rob Wilkins!
On the props they took with them: Rob has the iconic Devon watch??? He also has the statue at St. Beryl’s. Neil has a chair from the bookshop set (which he had to purchase from the BBC). Douglas has the playing cards that were featured in the baby swap scenes.
Neil's and Rob’s favorite bit that was added to the TV show from the book was the entire cold open. "Watching their relationship grow, everything felt rooted in the book, but it also felt like it was its own thing." For Douglas, it was David Arnold’s music!
Rob apparently had a cameo somewhere in the cold open??
Neil on the Bastille scene: "Did [Aziraphale] have any conception of the mess he was in? Probably not." Neil doesn't think Aziraphale did it on purpose so that Crowley would rescue him. He really just wanted crepes. "But the moment of joy when Aziraphale realizes he's been rescued is one of my favorite things."
Neil called the fans a “yoghurt starter.” "You put it into your warm milk and the whole thing starts to go off then it all turns into yoghurt."
Douglas read the script before he read the book (same as David Tennant). Michael Sheen was already a book fan long before!
Neil makes up weird little stories about the characters for himself. He puts in little details and Easter eggs that he thinks only he will notice (but people on Tumblr and Twitter notice and ask him about it lmao)
Neil wrote the script thinking Michael Sheen would be Crowley. Then when he was writing the Blitz scene he realized he wanted it to be David Tennant dancing down the aisle of the church, and that he wanted Michael to be Aziraphale instead. "I know Michael, and I know how much of him is Aziraphale... I wanted him to play someone that was Michael's inner goodness coming straight out."
According to Douglas, normally, for the screening that’s held for the cast and crew, only about 30 people show up, and they only stay to watch the episodes they worked on. But 300 people showed up to the GO screening for the cast and crew and they stayed for all 6 episodes.
Neil's favorite part of making the show: "The thing I loved most was the love."
Neil simply texted Nick Offerman and asked him if he wanted to play the role of the American ambassador. Jon Hamm's favorite book when he was a kid was Good Omens! Then Neil had dinner with Frances McDormand, and "by the end of the conversation, Frances was going to be God."
Neil on the budget constraints: "I was not put on this earth to fight budget battles. I was put here to create things...  All the cold open would have gone. The death of Agnes Nutter would have gone." (And it was Sir Terry who wrote that bit in the book!) The fandom lost the other four horsemen to budget constraints, too.
Neil, on Aziraphale and Crowley’s relationship: "There are definitely people out there that seem to think I accidentally wrote a love story. With all the beats of a love story and a breakup halfway through... There are just some things you do when you're writing a script that you do intentionally. When people accuse [Aziraphale and Crowley] of being a couple, they don't deny it. They don't argue. There's no flustering on their part. Other people in the story perceive them as a couple too."
Douglas, on the same topic: "I've been directing for quite a while. I tend to notice when the characters are falling in love... Everything is meant."
POSSIBILITY OF A SEASON TWO? "Season two? Of what?” NEIL, WHY ARE YOU TEASING US LIKE THIS. “All we have to do is hint that we're ready to do season two, and the old gang is just sitting around the kitchen table going, 'When do we start?'"
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freyjawriter24 · 5 months ago
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Watching Neil, Douglas, and Rob on their panel at @theineffablecon and it’s honestly amazing. I’m loving the community of the chat, the directness of the question system, the proximity of it all. What a wonderful opportunity.
In-person events are beautiful, and I do miss that, but this event clearly proves that online conventions work, and work well. Thank you so much to the organisers, the panellists, and everyone who worked on the platform.
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serafaina · 9 months ago
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I really dislike the way the director frames shots of Aziraphale in heaven. 
Because they’re all extreme close-ups of his face where there is some lens distortion like a fish eye lens and I hate it. 
I get why. The closeness is suppose to feel overly intimate and express that Aziraphale himself feels like he is under a microscope and being scrutinized closely while in Heaven. Ok. It certainly works to make me uncomfortable so bravo. Good choice Mr. Mackinnon. Directing win.
But I hate them. Because I wanna look at Aziraphale more, wanna watch that gorgeous acting without bendy-face. :C  
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symptom3000 · 10 months ago
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The Proclaimers "Letter From America" (1987)
director: Douglas Mackinnon
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magnetothemagnificent · 10 months ago
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I was reading a script for a play about the 1960s, and there was a line that said,
"Hey! Who is that man over there with sunglasses and swaying hips?"
Now who could it be referring to?.......
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......It was Elvis......
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devoursjohnlock · 10 months ago
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Doctor Who: Listen
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magnetothemagnificent · 10 months ago
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Now I'm just having fun.
Comment what romantic movie poster I should redo next.
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wisesnail · 11 months ago
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Hello and welcome to Good Omens - Behind the curtain c;
Let's celebrate #GoodOmens30 by paying homage to the less seen, but not less important, people who have contributed to make this show something I cherish and love, starting with Director Douglas Mackinnon c: ♥
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magnetothemagnificent · 11 months ago
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I can sing Good Omens's praises for its queer representation, but it's been done before by many people. What I think most people overlook is how well the book and show dealt with mental illness. Anyone who knows me knows one of my favourite pasttimes is diagnosing fictional characters.
Let's start with the most obvious character, our good demonic friend Anthony J Crowley.
In the book, he is described as anxious and obsessive. His flat is immaculately organized, he has his music alphabetized, and he likes his plants to be absolutely perfect. He is nervous, and terrified that he'll one day transform into a snake and never change back. The same is true in the TV series. He also puts on a facade of coolness, he literally wears sunglasses to hide his eyes. He has angry outbursts, especially when his carefully constructed persona is shattered. He's always searching for approval, worried he'll be rejected. In the show, he is so concerned that Aziraphale doesn't like his name or taste in music. These are all symptoms of anxiety and OCD, with a peppering of PTSD. Media has given society the wrong image of anxiety. Too often people think of a shy, cute, stammering person when they think of anxiety. Crowley is not cute. Anxiety is not cute. The same goes for OCD. People think of a neat-freak, but that is not the case. It's more in tune with yelling out plants for having leaf-spots, being constantly anxious because nothing is perfect. Good Omens gave me a character that finally accurately portrayed my experience with mental health.
Next we have Aziraphale.
Aziraphale can be the opposite of Crowley sometimes. Where Crowley is organized, Aziraphale is scattered. And yet, Aziraphale seems more composed than Crowley. Crowley's outfits are erratic, Aziraphale's haven't changed in a century. Aziraphale knows what he likes and what he dislikes, and sticks with it. The series shows more of Aziraphale's anxiety, mostly having to do with Gabriel and Heaven. Aziraphale is careful with who he associates with, and I'd reluctant to share his feelings. He is stubborn, and becomes flustered and angry when someone (Crowley) suggests he leave his comfort-zone. When Aziraphale is anxious, he dithers and fidgets, while Crowley cleans. I've seen posts before saying this, so I'm going to say this again. I think Aziraphale is autistic. And that makes me happy because there is so much harmful representation of autism in the media. There is either the impossibly intelligent 'Rainman' archetype, or the struggling, broken child. Aziraphale is none of those. He is a business owner, he's brave, he's passionate, and although he is technically an etheral bring, he is so overwhelmingly human, just like Crowley.
Finally, there's Shadwell. Most would say that his entire witchfinder business is the product of him being a con-man, and while he did con two people, I think that the witchfinder business is rooted in his delusional paranoia. His actions are very typical of a type of schizophrenia that is rooted in religion, which happens more than people realize. While he sometimes appears to be nothing more than a conniving scammer, we see him really struggle with his beliefs. We see him break down, he is so convinced in his duty to protect the world from occult forces. It drives him mad. If he was just a scammer, I don't think Madame Tracy would have been so kind to him. But Madame Tracy sees that he is suffering, that his delusions are hurting him. When his delusional come to life (Aziraphale), he is terrified. After the Not-pocalypse, he is a shadow of his old self. He is recovering from a breakdown, and doubts everything. In a way, Shadwell is one of the most tragic characters.
Too often the only representation we get of mental illness is in the victims or the villains, and Good Omens gave us neither (although it can be argued that Gabriel has narcissistic disorder). It gave us well-rounded, flawed but doing-their-best people.
As someone who struggles with mental illness, I was so touched by Good Omens for giving me characters I can relate to, and a story that does not revolve around their mental illness. They never overcome their mental illnesses, nor do they glorify it. That's what I loved most. There wasn't a "Aziraphale stepped out of his comfort zone and stated wearing other clothes," or "Crowley stopped being anxious and obsessive because he fell in love," or "Shadwell stopped believing in witches." It was beautiful.
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niceprophecies · 11 months ago
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Good Omens Behind the scenes
courtesy of Douglas Mackinnon @drmuig on twitter
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niceprophecies · 11 months ago
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Good Omens behind the scenes
Courtesy of Douglas Mackinnon @drmuig on twitter
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