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liiberi · 3 days ago
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Hearing the other come down, Porter searched for whatever was making the noise in his kitchen, realizing it was his husband who seemed to be still a bit drowsy from the events of last night. It was their anniversary weekend and the kids were away at a friends house. They had the entire house to themselves and he was thoroughly enjoying the weekend so far. “Well, good morning sunshine.” He chuckled as he continued to sip his coffee, seeing the other didn’t even bother to put on any clothes, which only contrasted to the pair of shorts he was wearing just to keep his junk in check. “Happy Anniversary babe...” He came up to the other, holding the other in his arms, kissing him smack on the lips and enjoying the tastes of some of the events from the night before. “Didn’t think you would be up so early. Was planning on making breakfast in bed for you.”
open to anyone (if m/m, any position) plot/scenario: pretty self explanatory this time. left it open to whomever you want to use for the plot! reach out if you have ideas or questions~
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blacksun-judar · 4 days ago
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haecooba · 4 days ago
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If anyone see this, I hope you have a great week
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liiberi · 6 days ago
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here’s a starter for @xwolfbonds​ with porter
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Porter took a good hard look at the other, not knowing really what to think about the other. The two had gone on a blind date with each other. However he never got to see the other’s face, as they were sent to go to a restaurant where they dined in the dark. Then if the date went well they could be led to a dark hotel room, never seeing each other’s faces and making love through the night. Of course, the next morning was the big reveal in which they got to see each other’s face for the first time. And by that morning, Porter woken up to a cute face and a wonderful smile. “The name’s Porter.” He smiled at the other, looking at him kindly to get some sort of convergence of ideas of what he thought he was going to be and who he actually looked like. And from what Porter was seeing, he was not complaining at all. 
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liiberi · 7 days ago
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*tag dump*
♞ 𝕞𝕖𝕔𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕚𝕔𝕒𝕝 𝕗𝕒𝕥𝕙𝕖𝕣𝕙𝕠𝕠𝕕 ♞ prime auto body ♞ 𝕣𝕖𝕒𝕝𝕚𝕥𝕪 𝕡𝕒𝕣𝕖𝕟𝕥𝕚𝕟𝕘 ♞ seasoned reality star ♞ 𝕟𝕖𝕨 𝕒𝕘𝕖 𝕕𝕒𝕕𝕕𝕪 ♞ fresh out the gate
♞ 𝕤𝕥𝕒𝕪𝕚𝕟𝕘 𝕗𝕣𝕖𝕤𝕙 ♞ starter call ♞ 𝕠𝕡𝕖𝕟 𝕓𝕒𝕣𝕓𝕖𝕢𝕦𝕖 ♞ open starter ♞ 𝕡𝕣𝕚𝕧𝕒𝕥𝕖 𝕘𝕖𝕥 𝕥𝕠𝕘𝕖𝕥𝕙𝕖𝕣 ♞ closed starter ♞ 𝕕𝕒𝕕 𝕛𝕠𝕜𝕖𝕤 ♞ meme reblog ♞ 𝕔𝕙𝕚𝕝𝕝𝕚𝕟' 𝕒𝕟𝕕 𝕘𝕣𝕚𝕝𝕝𝕚𝕟' ♞ answered meme ♞ 𝕡𝕒𝕥𝕚𝕖𝕟𝕔𝕖 𝕚𝕤 𝕒 𝕧𝕚𝕣𝕥𝕦𝕖 ♞ the queue
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fullynuttyengineer · 21 days ago
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The Cat
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aegipan-omnicorn · 23 days ago
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“Thought Slime” is another YouTuber that often does longer video essays. and at twelve-ish minutes, this is rather short for them.  The actual content of the main video ends at around 10 minutes, followed by a signal boost of a small, leftist, YouTuber with a video that deserves more views (a regular feature)
Auto-generated captions; accurate except for one word (”d growth” instead of “degrowth”).
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aegipan-omnicorn · 25 days ago
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Auto-generated captions.
Renegade Cut’s usual videos often run around 2 hours long, so at 15 minutes, this one is a shorty.
A lot of his videos are aimed at decoding and explaining fascist ideology, as well as certain sects of Evangelical, Fundamentalist Christianity, and his videos are typically so long because he takes the time to cite his sources, and explain their context.
Here’s the thesis statement for this video:
However, what those who debunk this nonsense, and those who defend Lil Nas X often fail to do is acknowledge that the central figure related to this panic: a fallen angel who sits on the throne  of Hell, is simply not real.  This is not a statement of skepticism of the supernatural, rather it is a statement rooted in Christianity. The Devil as depicted in the music video and in popular culture does not exist in the Holy Bible.
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aprettyweirgirl · 29 days ago
prt.2 sokka, azula, ty lee, mai, toph, and suki are tired of the heart eyes they all keep making at each other and try to get them together, kataras oblivious, zuko needs to be pointed in the right direction. izumi and kya get free drinks and food at the bar, lin cheers them both on:D then at some point they all go on a date and start datingc: suki and azula won the bet that they would start dating shortly after their first date, sokka will soon win the bet that they’ll all be wife’s in old age
azula has to basically slap zuko to make him see they are together
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aprettyweirgirl · 29 days ago
tropical kyalinzumi au(?) Kya and Bumi are surfers Izumi’s a volleyball player, tenzins like the equipment manager for both jsjsjsjsj. Lin’s the cute mixer at the bar, suyin is just there to rant to lin about her middle school drama, the og gaang are supporters and toph owns the bar lin works at. Suyins 13, Lins 19, Tenzins 20, Kya and izumi r 23-24, bumis 26/27. Gaang is like 48-60, toph being the youngest, Zuko being the oldest. Tenzin and Lin know each other from hscl, he rants to her ab them
i really love this, but can i make an addition to this AU?
can we let the Beifongs sisters be good sisters? please? 🥺
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haecooba · a month ago
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Happy Ramadan!
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aegipan-omnicorn · a month ago
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Doctor Octavia Cox reads an essay / by Virginia Woolf about Jane Austen’s last novel, and what Jane Austen might have written after that, had she lived.
I’m not sure I agree with Virginia Woolf’s speculations about the possible trajectory of Jane Austen’s writing after Persuasion, and what influence newly found fame would have had on her, but I do agree with her conclusion that this is a book that marks a shift in attitude in Austen’s work, and that is is deeply psychological.
Auto-Generated captions of variable accuracy. I’ve found the essay online, and copy/pasted it below (shh... the journal where it’s archived puts its stuff behind a paywall; I’m a pirate -- Yarr!).
Anybody who has had the temerity to write about Jane Austen is aware of two facts: First, that of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness; second, that there are 25 elderly gentlemen living in the neighborhood of London who resent any slight upon her genius as if it were an insult offered to the chastity of their aunts.
It would be interesting, indeed, to inquire how much of her present celebrity Jane Austen owes to masculine sensibility; to the fact that her dress was becoming, her eyes bright, and her age the antithesis in all matters of female charm to our own. A companion inquiry might investigate the problem of George Eliot’s nose; and decide how long it will be before the equine profile is once again in favor, and the Oxford Press celebrates the genius of the author of Middlemarch in an edition as splendid, as authoritative, and as exquisitely illustrated as this.
But it is not mere cowardice that prompts us to say nothing of the six novels of the new edition. It is impossible to say too much about the novels that Jane Austen did write; but enough attention perhaps has never yet been paid to the novels that Jane Austen did not write. Owing to the peculiar finish and perfection of her art, we tend to forget that she died at 42, at the height of her powers, still subject to all those changes which often make the final period of a writer’s career the most interesting of all. Let us take Persuasion, the last completed book, and look by its light at the novels that she might have written had she lived to be 60-years-old. We do not grudge it him, but her brother the Admiral lived to be ninety-one.
There is a peculiar dullness and a peculiar beauty in Persuasion. The dullness is that which so often marks the transition stage between two different periods. The writer is a little bored. She has grown too familiar with the ways of her world. There is an asperity in her comedy which suggests that she has almost ceased to be amused by the vanities of a Sir Walter or the snobbery of a Miss Elliott. The satire is harsh, and the comedy crude. She is no longer so freshly aware of the amusements of daily life. Her mind is not altogether on the subject. But, while we feel that Jane Austen has done this before, and done it better, we also feel that she is trying to do something which she has never yet attempted. There is a new element in Persuasion, a quality, perhaps, that made Dr. Whewell fire up and insist that it was “the most beautiful of her works.”
She is beginning to discover that the world is larger, more mysterious, and more romantic than she had supposed. We feel it to be true of herself when she says of Anne: “She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older—the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.” She dwells frequently upon the beauty and the melancholy of nature. She talks of the “influence so sweet and so sad of autumnal months in the country.” She marks “the tawny leaves and withered hedges.”
“One does not love a place the less because one has suffered in it,” she observes. But it is not only in a new sensibility to nature that we detect the change.
Her attitude to life itself is altered. She is seeing it, for the greater part of the book, through the eyes of a woman who, unhappy herself, has a special sympathy for the happiness and unhappiness of others, which, until the very end, she is forced to comment upon in silence. Therefore the observation is less of facts and more of feelings than is usual. There is an expressed emotion in the scene at the concert and in the famous talk about woman’s constancy which proves not merely the biographical fact that Jane Austen had loved, but the aesthetic fact that she was no longer afraid to say so. Experience, when it was of a serious kind, had to sink very deep, and to be thoroughly disinfected by the passage of time, before she allowed herself to deal with it in fiction. But now, in 1817, she was ready. Outwardly, too, in her circumstances, a change was imminent. Her fame had grown very slowly. “I doubt,” wrote Mr. Austen Leigh, “whether it would be possible to mention any other author of note whose personal obscurity was so complete.” Had she lived a few more years only, all that would have been altered.
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