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#anna belle kaufman
apoemaday · 25 days ago
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Cold Solace
by Anna Belle Kaufman
When my mother died, one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer. I couldn’t bear to see it vanish, so it waited, pardoned, in its ice cave behind the metal trays for two more years.
On my forty-first birthday I chipped it out, a rectangular resurrection, hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed, I sawed, with serrated knife, the thinnest of slices— Jewish Eucharist.
The amber squares with their translucent panes of walnuts tasted—even toasted—of freezer, of frost, a raisined delicacy delivered up from a deli in the underworld.
I yearned to recall life, not death— the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed, how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets after they took it away, inhaling her scent one last time.
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of sacred cake on my tongue and try to taste my mother, to discern the message she baked in these loaves when she was too ill to eat them:
I love you. It will end. Leave something of sweetness and substance in the mouth of the world.
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last-tambourine · a year ago
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"When my mother died,
one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer.
I couldn’t bear to see it vanish,
so it waited, pardoned,
in its ice cave behind the metal trays
for two more years.
On my forty-first birthday
I chipped it out,
a rectangular resurrection,
hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed,
I sawed, with serrated knife,
the thinnest of slices —
Jewish Eucharist.
The amber squares
with their translucent panes of walnuts
tasted — even toasted — of freezer,
of frost,
a raisined delicacy delivered up
from a deli in the underworld.
I yearned to recall life, not death —
the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed,
how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets
after they took it away,
inhaling her scent one last time.
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of
sacred cake on my tongue and
try to taste my mother, to discern
the message she baked in these loaves
when she was too ill to eat them:
I love you.
It will end.
Leave something of sweetness
and substance
in the mouth of the world."
~ Anna Belle Kaufman, Cold Solace
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chantgirl · a year ago
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COLD SOLACE
by Anna Belle Kaufman
When my mother died,
one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer.
I couldn’t bear to see it vanish,
so it waited, pardoned,
in its ice cave behind the metal trays
for two more years.
On my forty-first birthday
I chipped it out,
a rectangular resurrection,
hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed,
I sawed, with serrated knife,
the thinnest of slices —
Jewish Eucharist.
The amber squares
with their translucent panes of walnuts
tasted — even toasted — of freezer,
of frost,
a raisined delicacy delivered up
from a deli in the underworld.
I yearned to recall life, not death —
the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed,
how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets
after they took it away,
inhaling her scent one last time.
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of
sacred cake on my tongue and
try to taste my mother, to discern
the message she baked in these loaves
when she was too ill to eat them:
I love you.
It will end.
Leave something of sweetness
and substance
in the mouth of the world.
1 note · View note
asyoulikeitnow · a year ago
Text
Cold Solace
When my mother died, one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer. I couldn’t bear to see it vanish, so it waited, pardoned, in its ice cave behind the metal trays for two more years. 
On my forty-first birthday I chipped it out, a rectangular resurrection, hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed, I sawed, with serrated knife, the thinnest of slices — Jewish Eucharist. 
The amber squares with their translucent panes of walnuts tasted — even toasted — of freezer, of frost, a raisined delicacy delivered up from a deli in the underworld. 
I yearned to recall life, not death — the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed, how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets after they took it away, inhaling her scent one last time. 
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of sacred cake on my tongue and try to taste my mother, to discern the message she baked in these loaves when she was too ill to eat them: 
I love you. It will end. Leave something of sweetness and substance in the mouth of the world.
--Anna Belle Kaufman
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jiilys · 10 days ago
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hi! i have more poems if anyone is interested 
bad new government by emily berry: timeless and perfect. this one is a real favourite and now i get to write about it for my thesis! terrifically exciting!
the winter after your death by sharon olds: deep in my body my green heart / turns, and thinks of you
the rules by lelia chatti: a new all timer, i couldn’t talk about it enough. if you’ve never read a poem read this 
cold solace by anna belle kaufman: last month i read this to my flatmate and cried! i was on my period. also it sings. i love you. / it will end. 
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helpless-in-sleep · 12 days ago
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If poetry doesn't make you feel hungry, you're reading the wrong thing.
It’s when you sink your teeth into the plum that you make a promise. The skin is still warm from riding in the sun in Daddy’s truck, and the nectar runs down your chin. And you snap out of it. Or are snapped out of it. Never again will you lay a hand against yourself, not so long as there are plums to eat and somebody-anybody-who gives enough of a damn to haul them to you.
- Marry Karr, from Cherry
With all that’s destroyed, look / how the world still yields a golden pear.
- Ellen Bass, from 'Sous Chef' in Indigo
Dear Forgiveness, I saved a plate for you. / Quit milling around the yard and come inside.
- Richard Siken, from 'Litany in Which Certain Things Are Crossed Out' in Crush
Shall I part my hair behind?   Do I dare to eat a peach? / I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. / I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each.
- T. S. Eliot, from 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock'
I have eaten / the plums / that were in / the icebox / and which / you were probably / saving / for breakfast / Forgive me / they were / delicious / so sweet / and so cold
- William Carlos Williams, from 'This is Just to Say'
I tell you as soon as I know it’s me in here. / I do want to spill out of this timing. / I have normal desires. / Please bring me a peach.
- Jenny Drai, from 'Antipsychotica'
In that kitchen. I was not afraid of burns or scars; I didn’t suffer from sleepless nights. Every day I thrilled with pleasure at the challenges tomorrow would bring. Memorizing the recipe, I would make carrot cakes that included a bit of my soul. At the supermarket I would stare at a bright red tomato, loving it for dear life. Having known such joy, there was no going back.
- Banana Yoshimoto, from Kitchen
I hand you / Fruit like two swollen bulbs / Of light you can hold on to, / Watch your eyes brighten as you eat.
- Jericho Brown, from 'The Peaches' in The Tradition
God never meant man to be a purely spiritual creature. That is why He uses material things like bread and wine to put new life into us. We may think this rather crude and unspiritual. God does not: He invented eating. He likes matter. He invented it.
- C. S. Lewis, from Mere Christianity
And that orange, it made me so happy, / As ordinary things often do
- Wendy Cope, from 'The Orange'
She holds the blunt end of a knife toward the yolk of an avocado. Light pours into the room like a slowly forming idea. Today, she exists in the most sensible corner of a dream. She can’t remember who she’s wearing.
- Chioma Urama, from 'Tryna Get Right With God' in A Body of Water
So I ate myself, / bite by bite, / and the tears washed me, / wave after cowardly wave
- Anne Sexton, from 'The Sickness Unto Death'
What are we made of but hunger and rage?
- Anne Carson, from Plainwater
My rot is as hungry as me. & when God asks me about love, I always respond with cruelty.
- Yves Olade, from 'Belovéd'
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of / sacred cake on my tongue and / try to taste my mother
- Anna Belle Kaufman, from 'Cold Solace'
A story, after all, is a kind of swallowing.
- Ocean Vuong, from On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous
What my mouth means when / it opens is that I want to eat you / alive; to say “touch me” / without all the hesitance.
- Dani Janae, from 'Fig'
He breathes, Your body is my orchard. / I am undulating grass. / I am a field of wheat he parts with his fingers. / Poppies bloom in my veins. / When he kisses me, he tastes pomegranate.
- Tara Mae Mulroy, from 'Persephone Writes To Her Mother'
A smaller than usual crop, / but still enough to share with me, / as always at harvest time.
- Stanley Kunitz, from 'My Mother's Pears' in Passing Through
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staticpetrichor · a month ago
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anna belle kaufman // fleabag // richard siken
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Margaret Dumont (October 20, 1882 – March 6, 1965) was an American stage and film actress. She is best remembered as the comic foil to the Marx Brothers in seven of their films. Groucho Marx called her "practically the fifth Marx brother".
Dumont was born Daisy Juliette Baker in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of William and Harriet Anna (née Harvey) Baker. She spent many years of her childhood being raised by her godfather, Joel Chandler Harris at his home, Wren's Nest in Atlanta before returning to New York as a teenager.
Dumont trained as an operatic singer and actress in her teens, and began performing on stage in the U.S. and in Europe, at first under the name Daisy Dumont and later as Margaret (or Marguerite) Dumont. Her theatrical debut was in Sleeping Beauty and the Beast at the Chestnut Theater in Philadelphia, and in August 1902, two months before her 20th birthday, she appeared as a singer/comedian in a vaudeville act in Atlantic City. The dark-haired soubrette, described by a theater reviewer as a "statuesque beauty", attracted notice later that decade for her vocal and comedic talents in The Girl Behind the Counter (1908), The Belle of Brittany (1909) and The Summer Widower (1910).
In 1910, she married millionaire sugar heir and industrialist John Moller Jr. and retired from stage work, although she had a small uncredited role as an aristocrat in a 1917 film adaptation of A Tale of Two Cities. The marriage was childless.
After her husband's sudden death during the 1918 influenza pandemic, Dumont reluctantly returned to the Broadway stage, and soon gained a strong reputation in musical comedies. She never remarried. Her Broadway career included roles in the musical comedies and plays The Fan (1921), Go Easy, Mabel (1922), The Rise of Rosie O'Reilly (1923/24) and The Fourflusher (1925), and she had an uncredited role in the 1923 film Enemies of Women.
In 1925, Dumont came to the attention of theatrical producer Sam H. Harris who recommended her to the Marx Brothers and writer George S. Kaufman for the role of the wealthy dowager Mrs. Potter alongside the Marxes in their Broadway production of The Cocoanuts. In the Marxes' next Broadway show Animal Crackers, which opened in October 1928, Dumont again was cast as foil and straight woman Mrs. Rittenhouse, another rich, society dowager. She appeared with the Marxes in the screen versions of both The Cocoanuts (1929) and Animal Crackers (1930).
With the Marx Brothers, Dumont played wealthy, high-society widows whom Groucho alternately insulted and romanced for their money:
The Cocoanuts (1929) as Mrs. Potter
Animal Crackers (1930) as Mrs. Rittenhouse
Duck Soup (1933) as Mrs. Gloria Teasdale
A Night at the Opera (1935) as Mrs. Claypool
A Day at the Races (1937) as Mrs. Emily Upjohn
At the Circus (1939) as Mrs. Susanna Dukesbury
The Big Store (1941) as Martha Phelps
Her role as the hypochondriacal Mrs. Upjohn in A Day at the Races brought her a Best Supporting Actress Award from the Screen Actors Guild, and film critic Cecilia Ager suggested that a monument be erected in honor of Dumont's courage and steadfastness in the face of the Marx Brothers' antics. Groucho once said that because of their frequent movie appearances, many people believed he and Dumont were married in real life.
An exchange from Duck Soup:
Groucho: I suppose you'll think me a sentimental old fluff, but would you mind giving me a lock of your hair?
Dumont: A lock of my hair? Why, I had no idea you ...
Groucho: I'm letting you off easy. I was gonna ask for the whole wig.
Dumont also endured dialogue about her characters' (and thus her own) stoutish build, as with these lines, also from Duck Soup:
Dumont: I've sponsored your appointment because I feel you are the most able statesman in all Freedonia.
Groucho: Well, that covers a lot of ground. Say, you cover a lot of ground yourself. You'd better beat it; I hear they're going to tear you down and put up an office building where you're standing.
and:
Groucho: Why don't you marry me?
Dumont: Why, marry you?
Groucho: You take me, and I'll take a vacation. I'll need a vacation if we're going to get married. Married! I can see you right now in the kitchen, bending over a hot stove. But I can't see the stove.
Or her age (in their last film pairing, The Big Store):
Dumont: You make me think of my youth.
Groucho: Really? He must be a big boy by now.
Dumont's character would often give a short, startled or confused reaction to these insults, but appeared to forget them quickly.
Decades later, in his one-man show at New York's Carnegie Hall, Groucho mentioned Dumont's name and got a burst of applause. He falsely informed the audience that she rarely understood the humor of their scenes and would ask him, "Why are they laughing, Julie?" ("Julie" being her nickname for Julius, Groucho's birth name). Dumont was so important to the success of the Marx Brothers films, she was one of the few people Groucho mentioned in his short acceptance speech for an honorary Oscar in 1974. (The others were Harpo and Chico, their mother Minnie, and Groucho's companion Erin Fleming. Zeppo and Gummo Marx, who were both alive at the time, were not mentioned, though Jack Lemmon, who introduced Groucho, mentioned all four brothers who appeared with Dumont on film.)
In most of her interviews and press profiles, Dumont preserved the myth of her on-screen character: the wealthy, regal woman who never quite understood the jokes. However, in a 1942 interview with the World Wide Features press syndicate, Dumont said, "Scriptwriters build up to a laugh, but they don't allow any pause for it. That's where I come in. I ad lib—it doesn't matter what I say—just to kill a few seconds so you can enjoy the gag. I have to sense when the big laughs will come and fill in, or the audience will drown out the next gag with its own laughter... I'm not a stooge, I'm a straight lady. There's an art to playing straight. You must build up your man, but never top him, never steal the laughs from him."
For decades, film critics and historians have theorized that because Dumont never broke character or smiled at Groucho's jokes, she did not "get" the Marxes' humor. On the contrary, Dumont, a seasoned stage professional, maintained her "straight" appearance to enhance the Marxes' comedy. In 1965, shortly before Dumont's death, The Hollywood Palace featured a recreation of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding" (from the Marxes' 1930 film Animal Crackers) in which Dumont can be seen laughing at Groucho's ad-libs — proving that she got the jokes.
Writing about Dumont's importance as a comic foil in 1998, film critic Andrew Sarris wrote "Groucho's confrontations with Miss Dumont seem much more the heart of the Marxian matter today than the rather loose rapport among the three brothers themselves."
Dumont's acting style, especially in her early films, reflected the classic theatrical tradition of projecting to the back row (for example, trilling the "r" for emphasis). She had a classical operatic singing voice that screenwriters eagerly used to their advantage.
Dumont appeared in 57 films, including some minor silent work beginning with A Tale of Two Cities (1917). Her first feature was the Marx Brothers' The Cocoanuts (1929), in which she played Mrs. Potter, the role she played in the stage version from which the film was adapted. She also made some television appearances, including a guest-starring role with Estelle Winwood on The Donna Reed Show in the episode "Miss Lovelace Comes to Tea" (1959).
Dumont, usually playing her dignified dowager character, appeared with other film comedians and actors, including Wheeler and Woolsey and George "Spanky" McFarland (Kentucky Kernels, 1934); Joe Penner (Here, Prince 1932, and The Life of the Party 1937); Lupe Vélez (High Flyers, 1937); W.C. Fields (Never Give a Sucker an Even Break, 1941, and Tales of Manhattan 1942); Laurel and Hardy (The Dancing Masters, 1943); Red Skelton (Bathing Beauty, 1944); Danny Kaye (Up in Arms, 1944); Jack Benny (The Horn Blows at Midnight, 1945); George "Gabby" Hayes (Sunset in El Dorado, 1945); Abbott and Costello (Little Giant, 1946); and Tom Poston (Zotz!, 1962).
Turner Classic Movies’ website says of High Flyers: "The surprise... is seeing [Dumont] play a somewhat daffy matron, more Billie Burke than typical Margaret Dumont. As the lady who's into crystal gazing and dotes on her kleptomaniac bull terrier, she brings a discreetly screwball touch to the proceedings."
She also appeared on television with Martin and Lewis in The Colgate Comedy Hour (December 1951).
Dumont played dramatic parts in films including Youth on Parole (1937); Dramatic School (1938); Stop, You're Killing Me (1952); Three for Bedroom C (1952); and Shake, Rattle & Rock! (1956)
Her last film role was that of Shirley MacLaine's mother, Mrs. Foster, in What a Way to Go! (1964).
On February 26, 1965, eight days before her death, Dumont made her final acting appearance on the television program The Hollywood Palace, where she was reunited with Groucho, the week's guest host. They performed material from Captain Spaulding's introductory scene in Animal Crackers, including the song "Hooray for Captain Spaulding". The taped show was broadcast on April 17, 1965.
Dumont married millionaire American Sugar Refining Company heir and industrialist John Moller Jr. in 1910 and retired from stage work. The marriage was childless.
Moeller died during the 1918 influenza pandemic, after which Dumont reluctantly returned to the Broadway stage. She never remarried, and died from a heart attack on March 6, 1965. She was cremated and her ashes were interred in the vault at the Chapel of the Pines Crematory in Los Angeles. She was 82, although many obituaries erroneously gave her age as 75.
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wintryblight · 3 months ago
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sort poems by themes/authors
note: most of these embedded links don’t work & i’m not tech savvy enough to fix it, but you can always use the search function on top of the page. alternatively, you can type /tagged/author’s name or tagged/theme to the end of the home address to find a specific author or theme. replace any space with a hyphen.
example:
wintryblight.tumblr.com/tagged/richard-siken
wintryblight.tumblr.com/tagged/lingering-love
themes
perseverance
nature
food
recovery/healing
the body
grief
death
pain/sickness
childhood
loneliness
nostalgia
freedom
relationships
queerness
lesbians
desire
depression
stagnation
perseverance
hope
love
lingering love
unloved
unrequited love
intense love
fear of love
doomed love
heartache
mothers
fathers
family
dysfunction
the mundane
rage
numbness
stagnation
monotony
paralysis
feeling too much
understanding and being understood
music
self-acceptances
self-compassion
self-reliance
forgiveness
the moon
space
rain
bodies of water
travel
writing
personal favourites
prose poetry
authors
Hanif Abdurraquib
Kim Addonizio
Anna Akhmatova
Rosa Alcalá
Elizabeth Alexander
Hala Alyan
Maya Angelou
Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
Derrick Austin
Cameron Awkward-Rich
Ellen Bass
April Bernard
Emily Berry
Wendell Berry
John Berryman
Elizabeth Bishop
Anne Boyer
William Brewer
Richard Brostoff
Jericho Brown
Anne Carson
Grace Cavalieri
K-Ming Chang
Jennifer Chang
Tina Chang
Victoria Chang
Hayan Charara
Chen Chen
Inger Christensen
Steven Chung
Christopher Citro
Lucille Clifton
Barbara Cooker
Wendy Cope
Conchitina Cruz
e. e. cummings
Marissa Davis
Meg Day
Lidija Dimkovska
Chelsea Dingman
Sean Thomas Dougherty
Russell Edson
T. S. Eliot
William Fargarson
Megan Fernandes
Nikky Finney
Luiza Flynn-Goodlett
Richard Foerster
Vievee Francis
Clifton Gachagua
Ross Gay
Andrea Gibson
Aracelis Girmay 
Jenn Givhan
Louise Glück
Rodney Gomez
Oscar Gonzalez
torrin a. greathouse  
Linda Gregg
Jennifer Grotz
Jeff Hardin
Joy Harjo
Robert Hass
Rage Hezekiah
Neil Hilborn
Bill Holm
Marie Howe
Cynthia Huntington
A. Van Jordan
June Jordan
Donald Justice
Anna Belle Kaufman
Sarah Kay
Donika Kelly
Patricia Kirkpatrick
Joanna Klink
Nate Klug
Yusef Komunyakaa
Juliet Kono
Fortesa Latifi
D. H. Lawrence
Li-Young Lee
Joseph O. Legaspi
Alex Lemon
Jan Heller Levi
Robin Coste Lewis
Sandra Lim
Ada Limón
Sarah Lindsay
Timothy Liu
Audre Lorde
Dorianne Laux
Sally Wen Mao
William Matthews
Nathan McClain
Marty McConnell
Sjohnna McCray
Dunya Mikhail
Jennifer Militello
Tatsuji Miyoshi
Kamilah Aisha Moon
Tomás Q. Morín  
Robin Morgan
Gina Myers
Maggie Nelson
Pablo Neruda
Hieu Minh Nguyen
Frank O’Hara
Sharon Olds
Akilah Oliver
Mary Oliver
Meghan O'Rourke
Alicia Ostriker
beyza ozer
Shin Yu Pai
Pat Parker
Don Paterson
Octavio Paz
Catherine Pierce
Jon Pineda
Sylvia Plath
Meghan Privitello
Aleida Rodríguez
Claudia Rankine
Paisley Rekdal
Susan Rich
Max Ritvo
Sara Daniele Rivera
Kait Rokowski
Lee Ann Roripaugh
Muriel Rukeyser  
Erika L. Sanchez
Sappho
Nicole Sealey
Anne Sexton
Richard Siken
Jared Singer
Scherezade Siobhan
Emily Skaja
Carmen Giménez Smith
Danez Smith
Maggie Smith
Tracy K. Smith
Anne Stevenson
Mark Strand
Truong Tran
Wang Ping
Sanna Wani
Valerie Wetlaufer
Walt Whitman
Michael Wasson
Keith S. Wilson
C. D. Wright
James Wright
Diego Valeri
Jeanann Verlee
Laura Villareal
Ocean Vuong
Jenny Xie
Wendy Xu
John Yau
Emily Jungmin Yoon
Adam Zagajewski
Felicia Zamora
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bookbaran · 4 months ago
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All 173 books I’ve read this year:
January
The Wild Robot by Peter Brown
Join the Resistance by Ben Acker
Beyond the Black Door by A.M. Strickland
The Best at It by Maulik Pancholy
The Brothers Synn by Victoria Light
Promposal by Rhonda Helms
Missing Pieces by Carly Ann West
The Otto Digmore Difference by Brent Hartinger
The Rules and Regulations for Mediating Myths & Magic by F.T. Lukens
Dog to the Rescue: Seventeen True Tales of Dog Heroism by Jeannette Sanderson
The Pearl by Geoffrey Knight
The Billionaire’s Boyfriend by Geoffrey Knight
Monster of the Week by F.T. Lukens
February
Let Me Show You by Becca Seymour
Maximillian Fly by Angie Sage
Night of Dangers by Zack Loran Clark and Nick Eliopulos
Ice Wolves by Amie Kaufman
Waking Nightmare by Carly Anne West
Daybreak Bond by Megan Frazer Blakemore
The Importance of Being Wilde at Heart by R. Zamora Linmark
Mistakes Were Made by Stephan Pastis
The Seven Tales of Trinket by Shelley Moore Thomas
The Adventurers Guild by Zack Loran Clark and Nick Eliopulos
March
The Accidental Hero by Matt Myklusch
The Disaster Days by Rebecca Behrens
Race to the Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse
The Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda Petrus
The Rise of Kyoshi by F.C Yee
Scorch Dragons by Amie Kaufman
Martin McLean, Middle School Queen by Alyssa Zaczek
The Boyfriend Game by Stella Starling
The  Merciful Crow by Margaret Owen
The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper
The Magnolia Sword: A Ballad of Mulan by Sherry Thomas
Arcana by Jessica Leake
Well That Was Awkward by Rachel Vail
Drum Roll, Please by Lisa Jenn Bigelow
Spellbound by Allie Therin
Greenglass House by Kate Milford
April
Game Changer by Rachel Reid
The Playbook: 52 Rules to Aim, Shoot, and Score in This Game Called Life by Kwame Alexander
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
Booked by Kwame Alexander
Rebound by Kwame Alexander
Swing by Kwame Alexander
Camp Shady Crook by Lee Gjertsen Malone
19 Love Songs by David Levithan
A Gentleman Never Keeps Score by Cat Sebastian
Rick by Alex Gino
Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan
Solo by Kwame Alexander
Lock In by John Scalzi
Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot
May
How They Met, and Other Stories by David Levithan
A High Five for Glenn Burke by Phil Bildner
Only Mostly Devastated by Sophie Gonzales
King and the Dragonflies by Kacen Callender
In the Role of Brie Hutchens... by Nicole Melleby
Middle School’s a Drag, You Better Werk by Greg Howard
Wayside School Beneath the Cloud of Doom by Louis Sachar
The Extremely High Tide! by Kir Fox
Spellhacker by M.K. England
Head On by John Scalzi
This Is Kind of an Epic Love Story by Kheryn Callender
The Haunting of Tram Car 015 by P. Djèlí Clark
The Black God’s Drum by P. Djèlí Clark
Date Me, Bryson Keller by Kevin van Whye
We Were Promised Spotlights by Lindsay Sproul
The Ordinary Princess by M.M. Kaye
The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Perez
Frat Boy and Toppy by Anne Tenino
June
The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern
With the Fire on High by Elisabeth Acevedo
Future Fake Husband by Kate Hawthorne
The Worst Best Man by Mia Sosa
The Tail of Emily Windsnap by Liz Kessley
The Only Black Girls in Town by Brandy Colbert
Lintang and the Pirate Queen by Tamara Moss
The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune
My Fair Brady by K.C. Wells
Stay Gold by Tobly McSmith
Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman
The Disaster by M.K. England
Two Rogues Make a Right by Cat Sebastian
The One and Only Bob by Katherine Applegate
Pretty by Justin Sayre
July
The Henna Wars by Adiba Jaigirdar
The Magic Misfits by Neil Patrick Harris
If We Were Us by K.L. Walther
Kenzie Kickstarts a Team by Kit Rosewater
So You Want to Be a Wizard by Diane Duane
The List of Things That Will Not Change by Rebecca Stead
The Wolf at the Door by Charlie Adhara
The Ice House by Minette Walters
The Falling in Love Montage by Ciara Smyth
The State of Us by Shaun David Hutchinson
Girl Crushed by Katie Heaney
The Winter Duke by Claire Eliza Bartlett
Boyfriend Material by Alexis Hall
The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley
Rescued by Felice Stevens
August
The Masterpiece by Bonnie Dee
The Extraordinaries by T.J. Klune
The Matchmaker by Megan Derr
The Rapier Brothers by Megan Derr
The Unstoppable Wasp: Built on Hope by Sam Maggs
Love, Creekwood by Becky Albertalli
Black Magic by Megan Derr
You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson
A Model Escort by Amanda Meuwissen
Coming up for Air by Amanda Meuwissen
Fake Dating the Prince by Ashlyn Kane
Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho
Rattlesnake by Kim Fielding
Battle Born by Amie Kaufman
The Stories Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
Facing West by Lucy Lennox
Late to the Party by Kelly Quindlen
Felix and the Prince by Lucy Lennox
Slippery Creatures by K.J. Charles
Summer Secret by Raleigh Ruebins
The Second Story by Neil Patrick Harris
Dress Coded by Carrie Firestone
Hither, Page by Cat Sebastian
Austenland by Shannon Hale
September
Conventionally Yours by Annabeth Albert
The Train to Impossible Places by P.G. Bell
The Summer of Everything by Julian Winters
Something to Talk About by Meryl Wilsner
Eva Evergreen, Semi-Magical Witch by Julie Abe
Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Grabenstein
The Circus Rose by Betsy Cornwell
October
Ghost Wood Song by Erica Waters
Cemetary Boys by Aiden Thomas
The Left-Handed Booksellers of London by Garth Nix
Closed for the Season by Mary Downing Hahn
The Puppet’s Payback and Other Chilling Tales by Mary Downing Hahn
The Total Eclipse of Nestor Lopez by Adrianna Cuevas
Small Spaces by Katherine Arden
The Girl in the Locked Room by Mary Downing Hahn
The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier
Gustav Gloom and the People Taker by Adam-Troy Castro
The Old Willis Place by Mary Downing Hahn
The Doll in the Garden by Mary Downing Hahn
The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo
Nightbooks by J.A. White
Out to Get you: 13 Tales of Weirdness and Woe by Josh Allen
November
Miss Meteor by Tehlor Kay Mejia and Anna-Maria McLemore
Wild Trail by A.M. Arthur
Ana on the Edge by A.J. Sass
The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald
Mechanic by Betsy Cornwell
The Office: The Untold Story of the Greatest Sitcom of the 2000s: An Oral History by Andy Greene
The Other Side of the Sky by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner
December
Deceived by Megan Derr
The Candymakers by Wendy Mass
Burning Roses by S.L. Huang
Bernice Buttman, Model Citizen by Niki Lenz
Fable by Adrienne Young
Kenny & the Dragon by Tony DiTerlizzi
Glass Tidings by Amy Jo Cousins
The Remaking of Corbin Wale by Roan Parrish
This is All Your Fault by Aminah Mae Safi
Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur
Here the Whole Time by Vitor Martins
To Touch the Light by E.M. Lindsey
Redwood and Ponytail by K.A. Holt
The Demon’s Lexicon by Sarah Rees Brennan
The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
Hard Truths by Alex Whitehall
A Little Light Mischief by Cat Sebastian
Would it be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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books-and-floralteacups · 4 months ago
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A Ranking of All the Books I Read in 2020!
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This is a ranking of the books I read in 2020, ranked from most liked to least liked. While I may not have liked some of these books, I can still see and understand why others would enjoy them. I also commend all of these authors for their hard work on each of these books. This simply based on how much I enjoyed these books.
*I did not include any nonfiction books on this list. This is because I simply do not feel comfortable or okay with “rating” or “ranking” the story of someone’s life.
*These rankings will not really match up to my “12 Books of the Year” because that list is based on a sort of “monthly scale”. I could have hated a book, but it could still make that list because it was what I considered “the best book” I had read in that month in comparison to the other books I had read in that month.
In This Corner of the World by Fumiyo Kouno 
Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor 
The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta 
Return to the Isle of the Lost by Melissa de la Cruz
The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan 
Orange: The Complete Collection, Volume 2 by Ichigo Takano
The Girl from the Other Side, Volume 1 by Nagabe 
Orange: The Complete Collection, Volume 1 by Ichigo Takano
Dear Martin by Nic Stone 
Hilda and the Mountain King by Luke Pearson 
The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly by Sun-mi Hwang 
Orange: The Complete Collection, Future by Ichigo Takano
Kristy’s Great Idea by Raina Telgemeier 
My Friend Earth by Patricia MacLachlan
The Christmas Fox by Anik McGrory 
My Hero Academia, Volume 11 by Kohei Horikoshi
My Hero Academia, Volume 10 by Kohei Horikoshi 
My Hero Academia, Volume 6 by Kohei Horikoshi
My Hero Academia, Volume 7 by Kohei Horikoshi
Ruby’s Wish by Shirin Yim Bridges
A Wish to Be a Christmas Tree by Colleen Monroe
Peter and the Seal by Rick de Haas
The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat
Beastars, Volume One by Paru Itagaki
Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas 
Legend of the Fire Princess by Noelle Stevenson, Gigi D. G., and Paulina Ganucheau 
Seraphina by Rachel Hartman 
The Witch Boy by Molly Knox Ostertag
The Hidden Witch by Molly Knox Ostertag 
My Hero Academia, Volume 8 by Kohei Horikoshi
My Hero Academia, Volume 12 by Kohei Horikoshi
My Hero Academia, Volume 9 by Kohei Horikoshi 
Carry On by Rainbow Rowell 
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli 
Under the Love Umbrella by Davina Bell and Allison Colpoys
Crown of Midnight by Sarah J. Maas 
Drama by Raina Telgemeier 
Stargazing by Jen Wang 
Nicholas St. North and the Battle of the Nightmare King by William Joyce and Laura Geringer Bass 
Nimona by Noelle Stevenson 
The Selection by Kiera Cass 
Princess Princess Ever After by Katie O’Neill 
Olympus at War by Kate O’Hearn 
The Magician’s Elephant by Kate DiCamillo 
Belle’s Discovery by Tessa Roehl
Ariel Makes Waves by Liz Marsham
Cinderella Takes the Stage by Tessa Roehl 
Daring Do and the Marked Thief of Marapore by G. M. Berrow (“A. K. Yearling”)
The Assassin’s Blade by Sarah J. Maas
A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin 
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas 
Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas 
The Girl King by Mimi Yu
William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher 
The Princess Bride by William Goldman 
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins 
Lady of Ch’iao Kuo: Red Bird of the South by Laurence Yep
Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr
The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle
Teeny-Tiny and the Witch-Woman by Barbara K. Walker
After by Anna Todd
Love on the Other Side by Nagabe
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James 
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aelin-firebringer1 · 10 months ago
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Books by Black Authors: 
Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi 
A River of Royal Blood by Amanda Joy 
The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton
Kingdom of Souls by Rena Barron
A Phoenix First must Burn by Patrice Caldwell
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor 
A Blade so Black by L.L. McKinney 
War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi  
Books by Asian authors: 
Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim
The Wrath and the Dawn by Renée Ahdieh 
The Library of the Fates by Aditi Khorana
The Star Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi
Descendant of the Crane by Joan He
Empress of all Seasons by Emiko Jean
Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao
The Girl King by Mimi Yu 
Ash by Malinda Lo
Wicked Fox by Kat Cho
Wicked as you Wish by Rin Chupeco
The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco
The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi
Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho
Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara
The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo
Legend, Prodigy, Champion, Rebel by Marie Lu
Warcross, Wildcard by Marie Lu 
The Young Elites trilogy by Marie Lu 
Books by Middle Eastern authors: 
An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir 
We Hunt the Flame by Hafsah Faizal 
Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi 
City of Brass by SA Chakraborty 
A very large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi 
Other Words for home by Jasmine Warga 
Down and Across by Arvin Ahmadi 
Mirage by Somaiya Daud
You must be Layla by Yassmin Abdel-Magied
Does my head look big in this? By Randa Abdel-Fattah 
Book with a black main character 
Children of blood and bone by Tomi Adeyemi 
Crown of Midnight by Sarah J Maas
Tower of Dawn by Sarah J Maas
The opposite of always by Justin A Reynolds
A song below water by Bethany C Morrow 
Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo 
All the bright places by Jennifer Niven 
Black girl in Paris by Shay Youngblood
Books with an Asian main character
Warcross by Marie Lu
To all the boys I’ve loved before by Jenny Han
Emergency Contact by H K Choi
American Panda by Gloria Choi
Parachutes by Kelly Yang
Loveboat, Taipei by Abigail Hing Wen
Aurora rising by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
The terracotta bride by Zen Cho 
 Books with a Middle-Eastern main character: 
The City of Brass by SA Chakraborty
Rebel of the sands by Alwyn Hamilton 
An ember in the ashes by Sabaa Tahir 
The star touched queen by Roshani Chokshi
Other Words for home by Jasmine Warga 
We hunt the flame by Hafsah faizal 
 Books with a Muslim main character 
All American Muslim Girl 
A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi
Other Words for home by Jasmine Warga 
You must be Layla by Yassmin Abdel-Magied
Does my head look big in this? by Randa Abdel-Fattah 
 Books with Gay representation 
Red White and Royal Blue by 
They both die at the end by Adam Silvera 
Simon vs the Homosapiens agenda 
Six of crows by Leigh Bardugo 
The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
Spy stuff by Matthew J Metzger
The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Makenzie Lee
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe 
What if it’s us by Adam Silvera and Becky Albertalli 
Books with Lesbian representation 
Starting from here by Lisa Jenn Bigelow 
Girls of paper and fire by Natasha Ngan
The love and lies of Rukhsana Ali
Of fire and stars by Audrey 
The terracotta bride by Zen Cho 
We are Okay by Nina LaCour
The long way to a small, angry planet by Becky Chambers
The stars are legion by Kameron Hurley 
The raven and the reindeer by T Kingfisher
Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear 
 Books with bisexual representation 
Starting from here by Lisa Jenn Bigelow 
Girls made of glass and snow by Melissa Bashardoust 
Orlando by virginia Woolf
Black girl in Paris by Shay Youngblood
The fifth season by NK Jemisin 
Silver moon by Catherine Lundoff
Leah on the off beat by Becky Albertalli 
Let’s talk about love by Claire Kann (biromantic-ace!!)
Reign of the fallen by Sarah Glenn Marsh
Books with transgender/non-binary representation 
If I was your girl by Meredith Russo 
Lizard radio by Pat Schmatz
Dreadnought by April Daniels
Spy stuff by Matthew J Metzger
The moon was ours by Anna Marie McLemore
@feyrescrown-insta
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Text
Quarterly Wrap Up #1
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This is my Wrap Up post for the months of January, February, and March. I’ll also be posting my TBR for the second quarter of the year. What books have you read so far this year? What do you plan to read soon? :) 
Pictured:
In This Corner of the World by Fumiyo Kouno
Stargazing by Jen Wang 
Carry On by Rainbow Rowell 
Orange: The Complete Collection, Volume 1 by Ichigo Takano 
Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff 
The Assassin’s Blade by Sarah J. Maas 
Drama by Raina Telgemeier
Princess Princess Ever After by Katie O’Neill
Olympus at War by Kate O’Hearn
Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
Not Pictured:
My Hero Academia, Volume 6 by Kohei Horikoshi
My Hero Academia, Volume 7 by Kohei Horikoshi
Ruby’s Wish by Shirin Yim Bridges
A Wish to Be a Christmas Tree by Colleen Monroe
Peter and the Seal by Rick de Haas
The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat
Belle’s Discovery by Tessa Roehl
Ariel Makes Waves by Liz Marsham
Cinderella Takes the Stage by Tessa Roehl 
Daring Do and the Marked Thief of Marapore by G. M. Berrow (“A. K. Yearling”)
Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr
The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle
Teeny-Tiny and the Witch-Woman by Barbara K. Walker
After by Anna Todd 
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
The Magician’s Elephant by Kate DiCamillo
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
The Selection by Kiera Cass
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas 
Lady of Ch’iao Kuo: Red Bird of the South by Laurence Yep  
Crown of Midnight by Sarah J. Maas 
Orange: The Complete Collection, Volume 2 by Ichigo Takano
Orange: The Complete Collection, Future by Ichigo Takano  
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almaraye · a year ago
Text
COLD SOLACE
by Anna Belle Kaufman
When my mother died,
one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer.
I couldn’t bear to see it vanish,
so it waited, pardoned,
in its ice cave behind the metal trays
for two more years.
On my forty-first birthday
I chipped it out,
a rectangular resurrection,
hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed,
I sawed, with serrated knife,
the thinnest of slices —
Jewish Eucharist.
The amber squares
with their translucent panes of walnuts
tasted — even toasted — of freezer,
of frost,
a raisined delicacy delivered up
from a deli in the underworld.
I yearned to recall life, not death —
the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed,
how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets
after they took it away,
inhaling her scent one last time.
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of
sacred cake on my tongue and
try to taste my mother, to discern
the message she baked in these loaves
when she was too ill to eat them:
I love you.
It will end.
Leave something of sweetness
and substance
in the mouth of the world.
Source brain pickings
0 notes
intoxicatedfandom · a year ago
Text
Cold Solace
Anna Belle Kaufman
This poem originally appeared in The Sun Magazine, September 2010.
When my mother died,
one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer.
I couldn’t bear to see it vanish,
so it waited, pardoned,
in its ice cave behind the metal trays
for two more years.
On my forty-first birthday
I chipped it out,
a rectangular resurrection,
hefted the dead weight in my palm.
Before it thawed,
I sawed, with serrated knife,
the thinnest of slices —
Jewish Eucharist.
The amber squares
with their translucent panes of walnuts
tasted — even toasted — of freezer,
of frost,
a raisined delicacy delivered up
from a deli in the underworld.
I yearned to recall life, not death —
the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed,
how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets
after they took it away,
inhaling her scent one last time.
I close my eyes, savor a wafer of
sacred cake on my tongue and
try to taste my mother, to discern
the message she baked in these loaves
when she was too ill to eat them:
I love you.
It will end.
Leave something of sweetness
and substance
in the mouth of the world.
9 notes · View notes
nganbuiwritings · a year ago
Photo
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COLD SOLACE by Anna Belle Kaufman When my mother died, one of her honey cakes remained in the freezer. I couldn’t bear to see it vanish, so it waited, pardoned, in its ice cave behind the metal trays for two more years. On my forty-first birthday I chipped it out, a rectangular resurrection, hefted the dead weight in my palm. Before it thawed, I sawed, with serrated knife, the thinnest of slices — Jewish Eucharist. The amber squares with their translucent panes of walnuts tasted — even toasted — of freezer, of frost, a raisined delicacy delivered up from a deli in the underworld. I yearned to recall life, not death — the still body in her pink nightgown on the bed, how I lay in the shallow cradle of the scattered sheets after they took it away, inhaling her scent one last time. I close my eyes, savor a wafer of sacred cake on my tongue and try to taste my mother, to discern the message she baked in these loaves when she was too ill to eat them: I love you. It will end. Leave something of sweetness and substance in the mouth of the world.
0 notes