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#and fathers day was a great idea
rougeminded · a month ago
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Venting. Don't have to read.
How does an adult living on their own fight through their anxiety and tell their helicopter/anxiety inducing father they can't show up to Mother's Day Dinner because the mere thought of being made to feel bad I can't afford gifts right now is mentally crippling me?
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chuckhansen · a month ago
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as much as i want to make chris and jeremy super tight with each other ... i just can’t see them meshing in a non professions setting + he honestly doesn’t spend a lot of time around him since he’s been demoted kinda? now, josh and jeremy though ... i think THOSE two will be tight for a long, long time. i was playing around with the idea of jeremy not really training or observing under him from the get go, but, the two of them meeting at West African BSAA branch and talking just long enough that he was able to get a really, REALLY good impression from him... which led to josh leaping at the opportunity to bring him along when delta team was called in for help ... i get the feeling josh gets a grasp on ppl’s personalities really, really quickly so he knew jeremy was more than qualified to help
#insp: jeremy#even tho they would have met 2-3 days before#him being there during the kijuju crisis really was a huge coincidence but like .... also divine intervention#jeremy was just there looking at how other branch’s operated (ty gabby for that idea) and josh kinda latched onto him from the first intro#which is great bc i don’t think jeremy has ever had a true mentor in his life besides his father so it was a different kind of ‘military’#attitude to be exposed to#anyway....josh really fought tooth and nail with HQ when he heard abt jeremy’s probation and even tried to shoulder the blame for it#until they were like ?????? bro go talk to him please#jeremy obviously did NOT tell him the whole truth abt why he .... asked for probation we know this#but i think josh had a lot of respect for him when he took the ‘i’m taking responsibility for consequences’ route#even asked him if he’d consider transferring to the West African branch after his probation was up#jeremy respectfully said no offense but i never wanna step foot on this continent ever again#anyway#.... them being friends .... catching up at conferences .... i am seeing#even tho i feel like josh would be suspect suspect abt fatima since all that mess came out .... he’d probably badger jermy abt it#it’s a good thing he thinks he’s a good judge of character tho bc he’s able to change josh’s perception of her#i mean if he could accept help from jill after she was under wesley’s thumb ...#then he can accept what jeremy tells him
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weedle-testaburger · 3 months ago
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I'm honestly not big on the whole 'filler/story' divide people sometimes put stories into because there's this inherent implication that 'story' is always interesting and advances things and 'filler' is boring and you can and should skip it, when a lot of the time 'filler' episodes can be a lot of fun and subtly develop stuff or portray really interesting ideas and stories of their own while 'story' episodes can be convoluted messes that are so preoccupied with being Epic (tm) that they don't bother to make sense or have satisfying emotional stakes
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leafeonb · 10 months ago
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NO i am NOT starting the next video now
#lulu.txt#aa lb#dgs lb#yes the video is almost two hours long and i know it#will take me four days to watch it no i WONT start it right now i am trying not to start it right now#DUDE....👁️_👁️ I AM LOOKING. for a second i was like...bro. is that it?? is this the end? its just this? the end? and i almost got angry#over it HELP i was like 'wait what....then..HUH?'. but it was bc it seemed to be SO FAST vortex was just 'yeah yeah u got me lol i confess#BUT i was just protecting the law of our great city i love british people yes <3 this is the end everyone else go home NOW ok <3'#then i remembered that on case 3(? bro i have no idea) something like that happened too and i was like HEY WAIT A MINUTE. COME BACK.#HE FRAMED ASOUGIS FATHER FOR BEING THE PROFESSOR WHEN HE WASNT EVEN THE PROFESSOR FUCK YOUU.....#then he was killed the moment he could escape. bro. what the fuck that sucks <3 love and light <3#OK. ANYWAYS. THE TRIAL#dgs if there was a fey ancestor with channelling powers: much shorter. /JOKE#ALSO OOOHH WAIT i dont remember it very well but the music at the end was good but#it seemed like it was a lot of themes from the game in one theme.....at the start of it i was like#'wait is this that part asougis sexy prosecutor theme but a bit different or-' but it wasnt ajdhsjxjdjg#im not sure bc i think its been like half an hour.....maybe i forgot and his theme is actually stuck in my head#ALSO OH MY GODDD thank you kazuma asougi for asking b*rok about that OR ELSE THE TRIAL WOULD HAVE ENDED#ily asougi. LIKE. he brought up the discussion again and then vortex was like#'no i think we should stop and also there are only these 2 evidences....not worth it 😌' BUT.....BRO. THANK U ASOUGI FOR BRINGING THIS UP BC#I THINK MR VORTEX JUST LET SOMETHING SLIP.....LIKE. when he was talking about the papers that genshin left#HE TOLD THERE WAS THREE. but on the court record it says that there are two pages.......BRO? HELLO...#HEH......>:-) OK. ALSO WHEN there was rhe big silence i was 'wait nooo someone say objection now please.'#HELL YEAH RYUU.....LETS GO. the resolve of ryuunosuke naruhodou *starts to fucking cry* 😏 heh......this lawyer game is fucked up 😏#i cant stop thinking about it 😏 help.#one day i need to find the 'i love fictional men' post again bc it appears in my head everytime i see asougi /J#.....................i am looking respectfully.#THE NEXT VIDEO IS THE LAST ONE...this is not ok i need to lay down <3 goodbye 🚶🚶
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kiitsume · 11 months ago
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people don’t really talk about how being raised in a fundamentalist christian household and then growing up to be gay can make you almost crave or, like, expect punishments that will “rid you” of your gayness. like, when i first realized i was a lesbian, i actively looked up conversion camps and conversion therapies, even though i knew they were traumatic, because i felt like i deserved to be punished for accepting this as my identity and allowing myself to sin. i’m 21 and sometimes i still find myself feeling like i need to look into those avenues to “fix myself,” and the longer i’m gay the more i feel like i deserve it. it’s this ridiculous notion that righteous punishment will somehow cleanse my conscience and that i won’t have to “sin” any more, or that it’s my fault i’m nonreligious because i bought into this lie and didn’t punish myself soon enough or harsh enough or seek out the correct religious authority early enough and like. you end up carrying all this guilt and feeling like a glutton for righteous punishment where everything horrible that happens in your life is somehow justified because god-- one you may not even believe in anymore-- is punishing you for falling into sin.
#personal#vent#anti religion#anti christianity#conversion camp tw#homophobia tw#ask to tag#i've just been consuming a lot of atheist content today and my brain went 'oh well now lets go to a conversion camp and fix u up!'#like no. no i'm not gonna do that. what the fuck.#especially because in christianity suffering and punishment is glorified and like. overcoming struggles makes you admirable#so theres this part of me thats like 'it's not too late! you can suffer and fix yourself and it'll be great!'#i specificially say fundamentalist christian households because the christianity *i* practiced fits into the bite model and like.#we were the backwards christians. and by the time i got to middle and high school i was losing that a lot but.#i was homophobic well into high school even if at that point it was mostly internalized homophobia.#i was an apologist for some of the worst shit in the bible. i was raised to be.#i remember crying when i was a kid because i got grounded from church for one sunday and i was sure that god would come down during that#time and i would be sent to hell because i wasn't right with him. i remember my mom sitting me down and making me copy out all the verses#about a sin she thought i committed (something that took me days to finish) and then having a long talk with me about my eternal damnation#i remember when my dad was dying and i asked if i could pray enough to save him because he wasn't right with god and like. panicking#repeatedly about the idea that i hadn't done enough to save my father. and i remember at some point feeling like his death was punishment#for my sins and a way that god was trying to teach me not to doubt him.#i remember being raised with the idea that women were supposed to submit unquestioningly to their husbands and resist nothing#i wasnt the run of the mill christian and i wasnt even in one of the christian-based cults like mormonism or jws#and i'm glad i wasn't! but coming out of that believing that any worth my life had had in serving god was now null and void#and that without god nothing mattered and without my religion i would be destined for punishment and estrangement. was traumatic.#sorry for going off in the tags i have a lot to say
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henningfrenzel · an hour ago
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How contrarian hires and a pitch deck started Nubank’s $30 billion fintech empire
For most startups, the hardest early challenge is identifying a market and a product to serve it. That wasn’t the case for Nubank CEO David Velez, who understood the massive potential for success if he could break into Latin America’s most valuable economy with even a moderately modern banking offering.
Instead, the challenge was how to rebuild the concept of a bank in a country where banking is widely hated, all while the incumbents heavily entrenched with the state worked to block every move.
Nubank knew its market and geography, and through tenacious fundraising, inventive marketing and product development, and a series of contrarian hires, Velez and his team stripped bare the morass of Brazilian banking to build one of the world’s great fintech companies.
The challenge was how to rebuild the concept of a bank in a country where banking is widely hated, all while the incumbents heavily entrenched with the state worked to block every move.
In the first part of this EC-1, I’ll look at how Velez brought his skills and experience to bear on this market, how Nubank was founded in 2013, and how the team brought a Californian rather than Brazilian vibe to their first office on — no joke — California Street, in a neighborhood called Brooklin in the city of São Paulo.
The makings of an entrepreneur
The idea of being his own boss was ingrained in Velez from his earliest days in Colombia, where he grew up in an entrepreneurial family, with a father who owned a button factory. “I heard from my dad over and over again that you need to start your own company,” Velez said.
But years would pass and Velez still had no idea what he wanted to do. To “kill time,” and also to surround himself with entrepreneurial energy, Velez attended Stanford University — partially financed by the sale of some livestock — and then worked as an analyst at Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley before switching to venture capital at General Atlantic and Sequoia.
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henningfrenzel · 3 hours ago
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How contrarian hires and a pitch deck started Nubank’s $30 billion fintech empire
For most startups, the hardest early challenge is identifying a market and a product to serve it. That wasn’t the case for Nubank CEO David Velez, who understood the massive potential for success if he could break into Latin America’s most valuable economy with even a moderately modern banking offering.
Instead, the challenge was how to rebuild the concept of a bank in a country where banking is widely hated, all while the incumbents heavily entrenched with the state worked to block every move.
Nubank knew its market and geography, and through tenacious fundraising, inventive marketing and product development, and a series of contrarian hires, Velez and his team stripped bare the morass of Brazilian banking to build one of the world’s great fintech companies.
The challenge was how to rebuild the concept of a bank in a country where banking is widely hated, all while the incumbents heavily entrenched with the state worked to block every move.
In the first part of this EC-1, I’ll look at how Velez brought his skills and experience to bear on this market, how Nubank was founded in 2013, and how the team brought a Californian rather than Brazilian vibe to their first office on — no joke — California Street, in a neighborhood called Brooklin in the city of São Paulo.
The makings of an entrepreneur
The idea of being his own boss was ingrained in Velez from his earliest days in Colombia, where he grew up in an entrepreneurial family, with a father who owned a button factory. “I heard from my dad over and over again that you need to start your own company,” Velez said.
But years would pass and Velez still had no idea what he wanted to do. To “kill time,” and also to surround himself with entrepreneurial energy, Velez attended Stanford University — partially financed by the sale of some livestock — and then worked as an analyst at Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley before switching to venture capital at General Atlantic and Sequoia.
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