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#anansi boys
nicolaslibrary · 6 days ago
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Anansi Boys - Neil Gaiman
Synopsis:
God is dead. Meet the kids. Fat Charlie Nancy’s normal life ended the moment his father dropped dead on a Florida karaoke stage. Charlie didn’t know his dad was a god. And he never knew he had a brother. Now brother Spider is on his doorstep—about to make Fat Charlie’s life more interesting . . . and a lot more dangerous.
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zippocreed501 · 6 days ago
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Author Extraordinaire Neil Gaiman
photo: Rosette Rago for The New York Times
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americangodstalk · a month ago
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A call to all the fans of Anansi Boys
The American Gods Wiki needs you! 
The Wiki dreadfully lacks when it comes to Anansi Boys. Barely any pages about it, and when there are, they are barely summaries.
If you are a fan of Anansi Boys and have a little time on your hands, please come to the Wiki to help fulfill it! Help create pages, or develop the ones already written, correct mistakes, add info. We need your help! Anansi Boys has been overlooked for too long and we need to bring back this funny and gorgeous piece of fantasy all of its glory!
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hrshldoesmusic · 2 months ago
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Ok so this song is nice y’all
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hrshl-multilangue · 2 months ago
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Y’all! There’s 8 hours left to hear the first episode of Anansi Boys!!! Go listen because it’s real good!
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emilyccannings · 2 months ago
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Book News #3
Book News #3 Mid-Week Book news to keep you up to date!
Mid-week news of all the new exciting things happening in the book world!! Let me know in the comments what Book news your are most excited about! Barrington Stoke’s New Book Announced More Info: https://www.thebookseller.com/news/barrington-stoke-partners-rau-f-shine-spotlight-food-poverty-1233472 Barrington Stoke is paring up with the fantastic writer Onjali Q Rauf whose book The Boy at the…
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shortace · 2 months ago
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I forgot how arachnophobic I was and started reading Anansi Boys again. Fuckin’ genius, me.
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americangodstalk · 3 months ago
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The (so far) complete extended American Gods world
If you have read the novel “American Gods”, you might be thirsty for more of this universe. Then you are in luck, because “American Gods” is actually part of an extended universe!
Of course, you begin with the original novel, American Gods. 
Then you have the sequels (or rather as I call them inter-sequels. Neil Gaiman said he had ideas and worked a bit on a sequel to American Gods, though nothing is truly confirmed or set in stone, and said sequel would happen after these stories). The inter-sequels are short stories/novellas that detail the adventures of Shadow Moon as he travels through Europe. The first of those stories is “Monarch of the Glen” (present in the anthology book “Fragile Things”), telling of Shadow’s strange encounters during a stay in Scotland. The second is called “Black Dog” and can be found in the short story collection “Trigger Warning” - this one deals with Shadow’s adventures in England. 
Then you have the indirect stories. These short stories are related to the American Gods universe indirectly. There are two of them, as far as I know of, both of them in the anthology-book “Fragile Things”. The first is called “The Mapmaker” and was originally intended to be included in the novel American Gods, as a “story-told-in-the-story”, but ultimately Neil Gaiman could not find a place to put it so he kept this story as a separate short story. The second is called “Keepsakes and Treasures”, and it actually is tied to the AG universe by its protagonists, Mr. Smith and Mr. Alice, who are characters of “Monarch of the Glen”. 
Next is of course, the spin-offs, and so far American Gods only has one spin-off, “Anansi Boys”, which is centered around (as it name says) the sons of Anansi aka Mr. Nancy from the novel. Mr. Nancy appears several time in the novel, as well as numerous “Old Gods” from the same “pantheon” as Anansi. However, this book can be read without any knowledge of American Gods since they are no sequels and merely tied by the existence of a character and a premise. Not even the tone is the same, since Anansi Boys is much more humoristic and cartoony, closer to “Good Omens” for exemple. 
And then you have the “cameo” category. Works who are barely tied to the American Gods universe by a cameo. On one side, I heard that Neverwhere has a reference to Mr. Alice and Mr. Smith (and that in return Keepsakes and Treasures has a reference to Neverwhere in it), but since I never read this novel (shame on me) I couldn’t tell you exactly. And on the other, the work of Neil Gaiman the most closely tied to American Gods is actually Sandman. Sandman however isn’t a novel or a short story, but rather an entire series of comic books that are now part of DC Comics classics, and consist one of the biggest works of Gaiman. Not only does one character of Sandman appears in American Gods (if she does appear at all, there is just a character that is strongly implied to be her - Delirium of the Endless), but Sandman also shares numerous themes and concepts with American Gods such as the idea that the old mythological gods are dying. Bast, Loki, Thor and Odin all appear several times in the comic book (in their “original” incarnations), Bast precisely explains that she is slowly dying due to lack of belief and faith, and there is also the character of Ishtar that is very similar to the one of Bilquis in American Gods. 
So there you go. 
American Gods. Anansi Boys. The Monarch of the Glen. Black Dog. The Mapmaker. Keepsakes and Treasures. Neverwhere. Sandman. 
This is all the works that make (so far) the American Gods universe
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bookcoversonly · 3 months ago
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Title: Anansi Boys | Author: Neil Gaiman | Publisher: William Morrow (2008)
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ijustkindalikebooks · 3 months ago
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Stories are like spiders, with all they long legs, and stories are like spiderwebs, which man gets himself all tangled up in but which look pretty when you see them under a leaf in the morning dew, and in the elegant way that they connect to one another, each to each.
Neil Gaiman, Anansi Boys.
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brownpaperhag · 3 months ago
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you de one wit de lime???
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batfamscreaming · 3 months ago
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.....does Spider Nansi count as a member of the Spiderverse?
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14-ren · 3 months ago
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Clearly I know nothing about Neil Gaiman’s books, because I hadn’t known Anansi Boys and American Gods were in the same... universe? (Because they’re talking about a Mr. Nancy.)
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neil-gaiman · 3 months ago
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Anansi Boys, The Audio Drama.
The BBC Radio 4 adaptation of Anansi Boys has been available in the UK (on, for example, Audible or as a CD) and not in, say, the US, due to rights restrictions. BUT Radio 4 is rebroadcasting it this week. So wherever you are in the world, you can listen to Anansi Boys -- the first five episodes go up this week at 11:30 in the evening UK time, and then episode 6 (which is twice as long) will go out on Saturday at 3 pm. You can listen to each episode once it’s broadcast. And after that, they’ll be up for 30 days each. You can use the dedicated page or the BBC Sounds App to listen.
It’s funny, moving, brilliantly acted and really very good. The link will take you to the BBC Radio 4 pages, which are filled with little treasures...
It stars Lenny Henry, Jacob Anderson, Sheila Atim, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Nathan Stewart-Jarrett, Adjoa Andoh, Tanya Moodie, Julian Rhind-Tutt and lots of other wonderful people....
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09ghv0c
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the-moonangel · 4 months ago
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Bookmarks
I decided to make customized bookmarks for some of my books. Most of them are novels but there are other books, too. I have made three so far.
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Those are bookmarks I made for Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman, What If? by Randall Munroe, and, of course, Simon VS. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
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And I really like the result.
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duchess-of-tales · 4 months ago
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was tagged by @leer-reading-lire​ Thank you very much for tagging me! :)
7 COVERS IN 7 DAYS
Rules: Each day, I will post the cover of a book that I love and nominate someone new to start the challenge.
Tagging: @selkiewife​
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badbookopinions · 4 months ago
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Anansi Boys - Neil Gaiman
“It took me too long to read this book, because I loved it so much when I picked it up. I was a big fan of American Gods and Neil Gaiman in general, but this one is probably my favourite thing he’s written. 
Fat Charlie Nancy is living his average, boring life in London when he finds out his estranged father has died. A brother he’s never met shows up at his doorstep and starts messing with his love life and job. And to top it all off, his father was Anansi, the Trickster Spider.
(God I suck at summaries but I don’t want to look up the official one.)
I love love love how Gaiman structures this story - a cast of characters coming in and out of each other’s plots until they all converge at the end, and everyone being more important than they seem at the start. It’s the same way he wrote Good Omens, and that Pratchett wrote Discworld.
Also props for making the characters that in any other story would have been forgotten incredibly important. The central figures of this story aren’t mythological or big bad villains, the way they would be in any other book where the main character discovers a secret part of the world - they’re his boss, and his client, and his girlfriend.
Also, I really love Rosie (the aforementioned girlfriend). And Daisy. They could so easily have been pushed off to the side as soon as they weren’t important, but they kept being important.
I also liked the story-within-a-story elements: not just the Anansi stories, but the way Gaiman occasionally goes into the backstories of characters. My favourite one was how Daisy’s parents met because I found it adorable.
Plot: great. Good pacing, excellent subplots coming together - the moment when they all did at the climax I got so excited. The entire third act of this book is fantastic.
Characters: also great. I didn’t mention how much I love Fat Charlie and Spider but I do! It’s so much fun to be inside their heads. This is true for all the characters, even the evil ones - every time the POV switched I was either like ‘my girl/boy!!!’ or ‘oh exciting let’s see what this idiot is thinking about now.’ Fat Charlie’s arc, too - it fits in the plot-heavy book. I think the romances could have used a little work (cannot elaborate without spoiling but some situations were slightly iffy), but the platonic relationships (Rosie and her mother and the Nancy brothers) I really enjoyed.
Setting: nice. London and Florida are sketched out nicely. He spends time describing St. Andrews, and I don’t know if it was accurate or not, but it was a lot of fun to listen to and imagine. I’m going to take a second here to appreciate that the entire cast except for Charlie’s boss is Black, and while it isn’t a book about being Black it’s made clear and important.
Prose: Gaiman’s normal wit. Parts of this book reminded me of Pratchett - I know they were contemporaries, but sometimes you forget just how much they influenced each other. Pratchett is one of my favourite authors, so that was really nice to see. One of my favourites: “Stories are like spiders, with all they long legs, and stories are like spiderwebs, which man gets himself all tangled up in but which look pretty when you see them under a leaf in the morning dew, and in the elegant way that they connect to one another, each to each.“ Also, “he is four and a half and possesses that deep gravity and seriousness that only small children and mountain gorillas have ever been able to master.“
Diversity rating: a cast that’s 90% Black, passes the Bechdel test.
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