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#american revolution
gamesmedicine · an hour ago
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From historyinmemes (instagram)
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timelesspaperbutterfly · 3 hours ago
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Washington: Lafayette is such an amazing son. I wish he was my real son.
Jacky: ...
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nordleuchten · 5 hours ago
I love how accurate your posts are. Where do you get all this info?
Hello Anon,
thank you very much for your kind words.
My sources always depend very much on the subject of the post and on the access that I have. Generally speaking, I prefer contemporary sources. But while contemporary sources always offer great insight from people who witnessed certain events in history, on always has to keep in mind that their statements are not always true. They wrote these accounts for themselves and the people around them and not necessarily for future historians. They misremembered things or twisted things so that they would best fit their narratives.
FoundersOnline is a website that has a huge collection of letters from and by George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton - including their correspondences with La Fayette. La Fayette’s correspondence with James Monroe can in large parts be accessed via the The Papers of James Monroe from the University of Mary Washington. Furthermore, there are fife volumes of La Fayette in the Age of the American Revolution, a collection of letters and documents from 1776 until 1790. The Library of Congress has a good chunk of copies from handwritten letters between La Fayette and Washington. The websites of the Universities of Cornell and Cleveland have online collections with all sort of great documents. Same goes for the Lafayette College.
With regards to contemporary books, I can recommend La Fayette’s Memoirs and the book by his friend and physician Jules Cloquet. His wife Adrienne and his daughter Virginie also co-wrote a book.
When it comes to more modern books - I usually read what they wrote and then check their sources myself - but I can recommend anything that Louis Gottschalk wrote. He studied La Fayette like few others have. Lafayette by Harlow Giles Unger is also a good book. Unger places La Fayette on a bit of a pedestal, something that I dislike, but his book contains a great deal of references. I also like For Liberty and Glory by James R. Gaines, The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered by Laura Auricchio, Lafayette in two Worlds by Lloyd Kramer, General Lafayette in Wittmoldt by Alfons Galette and Lafayette by Andreas Latzko.
If there is a specific source that you would like to know, just let me know.
I hope you have/had a pleasant day!
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i-like-old-things · 6 hours ago
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Weather with Washington
“As yesterday in Wind and Weather.”
May 12, 1780
Morristown, New Jersey
The Diaries of George Washington Vol III
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76historylover · 8 hours ago
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Fort Ticonderoga Artifacts: Day Two
Hello fellow history nerds! I am back again with another post from the archives of Fort Ticonderoga. This one I think is really neat and I believe I saw it when I was at the fort myself.
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This is a locket that has a piece of George Washington's hair in it!
Description from the website: Gold locket with convex glass front and back, enclosing a lock of George Washington's hair backed with paper. The reverse contains a small swatch of a pale blue textile, apparently a piece of a battle flag surrendered at Yorktown which was presented to Washington by the first Congress.
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nationsandcannons · 9 hours ago
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May 12, 1784
Regarding the American treaty, the key episodes came in September 1782, when French Foreign Minister Vergennes proposed a solution that was strongly opposed by his ally, the United States. France was exhausted by the war, and everyone wanted peace except for Spain, which insisted on continuing the war until it could capture Gibraltar from the British. Vergennes came up with the deal that Spain would accept instead of Gibraltar. The United States would gain its independence but be confined to the area east of the Appalachian Mountains. Britain would keep the area north of the Ohio River, which was part of the Province of Quebec. In the area south of that would be set up an independent Indian barrier state under Spanish control.
However, the Americans realized that they could get a better deal directly from London. John Jay promptly told the British that he was willing to negotiate directly with them, cutting off France and Spain. The British Prime Minister Lord Shelburne agreed. He was in charge of the British negotiations (some of which took place in his study at Lansdowne House, now a bar in the Lansdowne Club) and he now saw a chance to split the United States away from France and make the new country a valuable economic partner. The western terms were that the United States would gain all of the area east of the Mississippi River, north of Florida, and south of Canada. The northern boundary would be almost the same as today.
The United States would gain fishing rights off Canadian coasts and agreed to allow British merchants and Loyalists to try to recover their property. It was a highly favorable treaty for the United States, and deliberately so from the British point of view. Prime Minister Shelburne foresaw highly profitable two-way trade between Britain and the rapidly growing United States, as indeed came to pass. (source: Wikipedia)
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henryshybitchclinton · 9 hours ago
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Sir Henry Clinton at the Siege of Charleston
despite being the commander in chief, he was ever mindless of his personal safety. Clinton might appear in the trenches at 3am for a surprise inspection, or show up in the batteries with shells bursting around him.
“The General, from the first moment to the hour of surrender, was the most indefatigable officer in the lines, where at all hours, and in perilous ones, he exposed his health and life.”
It was this kind of bravery that usually endeared British Commanders to their men, but not Clinton. His men never came to love him the way they had with the equally reckless Howe or Cornwallis. But of course, Clinton had the bravery but not the personalities of those men.
Source: Portrait of a General by Willcox
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henryshybitchclinton · 10 hours ago
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The Siege of Charleston 1780
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On May 12 the city of Charleston surrendered to forces under the command of British General Sir Henry Clinton after a prolonged siege
It was Clinton’s greatest victory of his military career, and one of the worst American defeats of the war
The entire southern army was captured
It was sweet revenge for Clinton, who four years before had tried to take Charleston and failed at the time
Yet, Clinton’s victory had within it the seeds of defeat. He fell out with Lord Cornwallis during this time, and their feud would paralyze the war effort
At Charleston, the long road to Yorktown began
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kellerthet · 10 hours ago
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«The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the Revolutionary War or the American War of Independence, was initiated by delegates from thirteen American colonies of British America in Congress against Great Britain over their objection to Parliament's taxation policies and lack of colonial representation»
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John Laurens After He Shot Charles Lee
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princesspreze7 · a day ago
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he really was a genius...
...with great logic too
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i-like-old-things · a day ago
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Yesterday, in jazz band, the teacher said “my god” in a very 1776 John Adams way and immediately I thought of that picture that Ink has and I almost started crying because I was trying not to laugh
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i-like-old-things · a day ago
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Weather with Washington
“Clear but too cool for the Season the Wind being fresh from the No. West.”
May 11, 1780
Morristown, New Jersey
The Diaries of George Washington Vol III
*side note* George Washington is actually really accurate today...it’s currently 63° Fahrenheit (17° Celsius) and fairly clear in Morristown today!
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i-like-old-things · a day ago
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Another day another history class:
Once again, we talked about the calves of Louis XIV and we added Henry VIII (which is kind of weird since we’re talking about WWI)
We watched that one scene from Rocky where he’s running up the steps because some kind in my class was wearing grey sweatpants and a grey sweatshirt
We talked about the fashion of women in the 1800s (my history teacher never specified 1800s or 19th century or whatever but she talked about tight lacing and corsets which weren’t around until the 19th century)
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bantarleton · a day ago
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A soldier of the Anspach Jager Corps during the American Revolution. Not all jagers in the conflict were Hessians. Anspach-Bayreuth provided a large contingent who were and equal match for colonial riflemen. Art by Don Troiani. 
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Maybe you’d also like John Burgoyne’s very pretty signature on your blog
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