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#Wilt Chamberlain
emperoreasy · a day ago
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These are definitely “I can fuck any bitch I want” numbers
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jedivoodoochile · 3 days ago
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Arnold Schwarzenegger & Wilt Chamberlain en Conan The Destroyer.
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baronmaymystery · 8 days ago
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Quadruple and Quintuple-Doubles
Before blocks and steals were official statistics, Wilt Chamberlain got a quintuple-double on March 18, 1968, with a stat line of 53/32/14/24/11... yes, 24 blocks... few realize how dominant Wilt Chamberlain was...
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Chamberlain also got an unofficial quadruple-double in the 1967 playoffs, against Bill Russell’s Celtics no less, on March 31, 1967, with a stat line of 24/32/13 and 12 blocked shots.
But it was Chamberlain’s rival, Bill Russell who, against Chamberlain, got history’s first quadruple-double on January 26, 1961, with 15 points, 25 rebounds, 13 blocks and 15 steals (yes, Russell is the GOAT):
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But these two were not the only players robbed of quadruple-doubles by scorekeepers who couldn’t be bothered to keep count. 26 days before getting an official quadruple-double, Hakeem Olajuwon, on March 3, 1990, got a quadruple-double (29 points, 18 rebounds, 11 blocked shots and 10 assists), but the scorers failed to notice one of the assists.
When the Houston Rockets did notice the assist, they changed the box score to 10 assists, but the NBA intervened, not on the grounds that the assist did not happen, but on the grounds that the league, not the team, was (according to the league, conveniently) supposed to have the sole right to alter box scores after the fact, thus “officially” leaving Olajuwon at 9 assists and robbing him of his rightful place as being the only player to get two “official” quadruple-doubles.
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bearfoottruck · 11 days ago
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As usual, I was screwing around on the Internet rather than working on one of my latest stories, and I found something so heartwarming that I just had to share it. I realize that not everybody here is a fan of John Wayne, and I know that most - if not all - of us have had our fair share of gripes with the US government, but really, I feel that this message is too important to not share with everybody, and I want all of you to wake up tomorrow and make something out of your day no matter how horrible it turns out to be. The way I see it, if we all do that, then we might not just end up making a better country, but a better world. Ciao for now, and grease for peace!
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baronmaymystery · 15 days ago
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RIP
Mark Eaton, the career NBA leader in blocks per game, has passed away. No one else in the modern era was like him. At 7 foot 4, 275 pounds, he had great height, but also the stamina that thinner centers do not have, in the context of the game’s physicality at that time.
Eaton, 64, is believed by preliminary reports to have been struck by an automobile while riding a bicycle in Summit County, Utah.
Eaton, outside basketball, also founded a philanthropic foundation, Mark Eaton Standing Tall for Youth, for at-risk youth.
Eaton made well known that his NBA career would never have happened but for advice he got at UCLA from Wilt Chamberlain, which was to focus on defense and rebounding rather than trying to keep pace with smaller men in transition.
As a result, Eaton still holds the record for shots blocked in a season, with 456 in 1984-85, playing for the Utah Jazz, for whom he played his entire professional career.
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baronmaymystery · 17 days ago
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Celeb Graphology (Athletes)
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Wilt Chamberlain gave the appearance of being extremely self-confident, but as the low t-bar in Wilt shows, he actually had low self-esteem. In addition, there is marked anxiety in the shakiness at the end of his signature.
The reason for this fearfulness was that he was a frail child, nearly dying of pneumonia as a child and missing a grade because of it... his bravado as an adult was overcompensation for a shy, frail youth that haunted him.
In addition, his extremely high i-dot in “Wilt” indicates a wild imagination which, taken with the temper tic in the “W”, as well as the overall insecurity, shows a tendency toward paranoia, exhibited in his thin skin and long grudges regarding real and perceived slights.
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Tonya Harding was, until recently, vilified in the media, until the full extent of her painful, sometimes horrific childhood came to light.
Most of this signature is perfectly “normal”, and the way she efficiently connects the “y” to the “H” shows a high degree of intelligence.
Her “stage mother”, however, did do her some damage: There is anxiety in the shakiness in parts of Harding which, combined with OCD tendencies in having to repeat the “hook” shapes in the “H”, “g” and smiley face (the last resembles “compulsory figures”), and the sublimation of all libido into figure skating, as shown by the only real lower zone resembling the compulsory figures required in this sort of skating, shows someone whose mother made her eat, sleep and breathe figure skating.
However, many have self-destructed over far less, and as the confident “T” shows, Tonya is coping well, all things considered.
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Tiger Woods is unquestionably obsessive-compulsive (as so many successful people are), this being double-edged: It drove him to win so many golf tournaments, but also led to addictions in his personal life.
His OCD is clearly demonstrated in his rigid repetition of up and down shapes, even when they do not represent any particular letters, taking up a lot of time (which celebs seldom have much of when it comes to signing autographs).
In addition, the “T” in Tiger is “broken” which, in context, likely alludes to back pain (physical pain often worsens compulsive behavior, because relief is sought), but it also shows a fundamental “disconnect” between his id (the lower zone) and his upper zones (the superego)... a sort of moral schism in his personality.
Alarming is the pen stroke from the “r” in Tiger, pointing back ominously at his own name... this indicates self-destructive tendencies.
On top of all the other problems, his father, who passed away in 2006, was in poor health from at least 1998, hence Tiger does not write out his last name.
Tiger Woods will probably never be considered the greatest golfer ever, and ironically, the very things that drove him compulsively to succeed also prevented him from achieving his full potential.
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Candace Parker is almost too nice. She got into basketball because her dad expected it, and #3, which she says she chose because of her teenage crush on Allen Iverson, also represents her initial reluctance to play basketball because she thought her dad and her older brother were better at it, which in hindsight is not true, of course, but she felt she was “number three” to them.
She is very feminine (round, decorative shapes) and superego-driven, hence feeling obligated to play basketball, both for her dad and for her home city of Chicago. She is mildly OCD, but this is because her father expected her to practice basketball very, very hard.
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The best pound-per-pound female MMA fighter in the world, Amanda Nunes, found her mother, herself a Vale Tudo fighter of considerable ability, to be “a tough person, very strict” (though she emphasized that she respected her mom), so she chooses to use her paternal name.
What is atypical for someone in such a rough sport is the sweet heart shape that makes up most of her name. Her family, especially her uncle and mother, very much expected her to go into martial arts (I’m sensing a trend with these athletes), so although she holds the record for knockouts in the bantamweight division, I suspect she is a very gentle person outside her profession.
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baronmaymystery · 17 days ago
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Why 1960′s Superstars Were Better Than Today’s NBA Stars
I’ve gone over this in bits and pieces, but I’ll lay out the entire case here:
(1) Until the ABA showed up in 1968, there were just 10 teams. Now there are 30. In addition, the top players play fewer minutes now, meaning larger benches- in other words, the standards for getting into the NBA were far higher 55 years ago than they are today, since basketball was already very popular (because of George Mikan, Bob Cousy and a young Bill Russell) and I do not believe that 3 or 4 times as much talent is going into the sport now as compared to then.
(2) The two top centers, Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell, both had backgrounds as elite high jumpers... thus more raw athleticism than even the best players today.
(3) The rules then prohibited palming the ball to do a crossover, so point guards Oscar Robertson and Jerry West averaged 25.7 and 27.0 PPG with much stricter rules on their ballhandling.
(4) There was no 3-point line. This especially hurt Jerry West’s stats: 27 points per game with the nickname “Mr. Outside”... imagine what he would do with today’s volume 3-point shooting!
(5) There were much narrower criteria for what constituted an “assist”, so Oscar Robertson’s triple-double season and 9.5 career assists per game would be even higher today.
(6) The big men hammered smaller men who dared go in the paint. Back then, they considered it their territory, and took it personally if any guard dared to enter it.
(7)  The shoes they wore were, compared to today’s high-tech shoes, very primitive foot coverings, so any great feats of leaping by Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain and other would have been even greater with today’s shoes.
 (8) There was far more perimeter defense allowed then, including hand-checking, so again, the guards were, up until the 21st century, under far more physical and mental pressure.
So yes, basketball’s golden age essentially coincided with the career of Bill Russell... from the mid-1950′s until the end of the 60′s. In addition to the players I named above, there was Bob Pettit (whom Bill Russell considers the best power forward of all time), Walt Bellamy, Nate Thurmond, Elgin Baylor, John Havlicek, Willis Reed and the criminally underrated Sam Jones, the original “Mr. Clutch”.
‘66-’67 Philly would beat any other team ever to play in the NBA, and the Russell-era Celtics dynasty would not only defeat but embarrass the 80′s Lakers, 90′s Bulls, 00′s Lakers or 2010′s Warriors... and this is coming from someone born in 1985. 
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baronmaymystery · 17 days ago
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Bill Russell and Wilt Chamberlain: In a League of Their Own
Basketball fans and “journalists” have utterly forgotten the existence of Bill Russell and Wilt Chamberlain. When Dennis Rodman rebounded well, sports reporters called him the best rebounder ever. Now, the same people are calling Andre Drummond the greatest offensive rebounder ever. Seriously?
Granted, no one counted offensive vs. defensive rebounds in the days of Russell and Chamberlain, but let’s just look at total rebounds:
Wilt Chamberlain: 23,924
Bill Russell: 21,620
Moses Malone: 17,834
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 17,440
Until we get down to #24, Dennis Rodman, with 11,954, and #63, Andre Drummond, with 8,839.
What about per game? Same idea:
Wilt Chamberlain: 22.89
Bill Russell: 22.45
Bob Pettit: 16.22
Jerry Lucas: 15.61
Nate Thurmond: 15.00
Mel Daniels: 14.91
Wes Unseld: 13.99
Andre Drummond: 13.70
... with Dennis Rodman at #12 with 13.12 per game.
What about compared to the league? Wilt Chamberlain led the NBA both in total rebounds and rebounds per game 11 times. Drummond and Rodman have done so 4 times in total rebounds, with Rodman leading in rebounds per game 7 times and Drummond 5 times.
The only reason Russell did not do better in this category is that he finished second to Chamberlain in total rebounds 6 times and rebounds per game 5 times. If we go by most times in the top 3 in those categories, the picture becomes clearer. 
Wilt Chamberlain was in the top three in total rebounds a record 13 times, with Russell second at 12, Dwight Howard third at 9, with Rodman and Drummond tied for sixth at 7.
In rebounds per game, Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell share the lead by being in the top three 13 times each, Dwight Howard tied with Moses Malone for third with 9, Dennis Rodman tied for fifth with Dikembe Mutombo at 8 and Andre Drummond tied with Bob Pettit for seventh with 7.
To get into Russell and Chamberlain’s 20,000 rebounds club, Drummond would have to keep up his 2014 to 2019 pace, excluding lockdown and his rookie year, without injury or interruption, through age 39. If he can do that, then we can talk about Drummond as being in their league, at least in terms of rebounding, but that is wildly improbable.
As for Rodman, his career high in rebounds was 34, in an overtime game against Indiana on March 4, 1992, Indiana, with the opposing power forward being Detlef Schrempf, who never averaged double figures in rebounds, and more importantly, Indiana’s usual center, the 7 foot 4 Rik Smiths, being out of the lineup that night.
Wilt Chamberlain, by contrast, had a career high of 55 rebounds (which remains an all-time record), accomplished on November 24, 1960. The opposing center? Bill Russell...
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unkutraw · 18 days ago
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Clash of the titans…Kareem & Wilt
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ti4ed · 22 days ago
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Wilt Chamberlain, Andre the Giant, and Richard Fleischer on the set of Conan the Destroyer (1984).
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lovesthe1980s · 24 days ago
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Arnold Schwarzenegger and Wilt Chamberlain in Conan The Destroyer
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baronmaymystery · 25 days ago
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The greatest team ever, the 1966-67 Philadelphia 76ers.
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baronmaymystery · 25 days ago
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The “GOAT” Team
History’s greatest basketball team, in regular professional competition, was the 1966-67 Philadelphia 76′ers. There were just 10 teams (today there are 30), no ABA to dilute the talent, and the 76′ers went 68-13, winning the world championship, first beating the Cincinnati Royals (Oscar Robertson) in 4 games (best of 5), then beating the Boston Celtics, who had come off winning 8 world championships in a row, also in 5 games (best of 7), then defeated the San Francisco Warriors (Rick Barry and Nate Thurmond) in 6 games (best of 7).
Wilt Chamberlain had his greatest season as a team player, with a stat line of 24/24/8, shooting an astounding 68% on field goals.
They had two Hall of Famers, Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham, sharing the small forward position, for a combined stat line of 38/15/5. They had another Hall of Famer, Hal Greer, at shooting guard, adding 22 points per game.
Wilt Chamberlain averaged a triple-double of 22 points, 32 rebounds and 10 assists in the series against Boston, with the opposing center being Bill Russell, the only man other than Chamberlain to get 20,000 rebounds in his career.
Many debate whether MJ or LeBron is the GOAT...
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brandfearn-blogs-here · 29 days ago
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I was feeling this picture. They had it near the bathrooms in Springfield Mall (PA) until the past year.
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baronmaymystery · 29 days ago
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Most Times Leading the NBA...
... in points:
Michael Jordan (11)
Wilt Chamberlain (7)
Kevin Durant (5)
... in rebounds:
Wilt Chamberlain (11)
Dwight Howard (6)
Moses Malone (5)
... in assists:
John Stockton (9)
Bob Cousy (8)
Oscar Robertson and Steve Nash (6 each)
and in triple-doubles:
Jason Kidd (11)
Magic Johnson (10)
Oscar Robertson (6)
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hoopstalk · a month ago
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Most Triple Doubles Ever:
181 Russell Westbrook*
181 Oscar Robertson
138 Magic Johnson
107 Jason Kidd
99 LeBron James
78 Wilt Chamberlain
59 Larry Bird
58 James Harden
56 Nikola Jokic
43 Fat Lever
35 Luka Doncic
One of the most unbreakable marks was tied tonight (and soon to be broken), hats off to Russ!
*active players in bold
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unkutraw · a month ago
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Clash of the titans...Wilt vs Kareem
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unkutraw · a month ago
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Legends section...MJ & Wilt
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