Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#SPECTRUM INTRUDERS
Best 4G Mini Bullet Camera Manufacturer in the USA
Adiance is one of the best leading CCTV manufacturers and service providers in the USA with ISO certification. 4G Mini Bullet Camera Manufacturer provides leading and extensive wireless things with extraordinary innovation and solutions with complete reliability for every business and corporate. It is also named as one of the leading competition in the camera manufacturing and service provider industry which works with more than 20 different clients of the distinguished sector in the USA.
Tumblr media
They have served companies and industries in different capacities and potentially enhances the production of great results from the collaboration with different industries and sectors. Their partnerships with the clients have led to sustainable growth and opportunity at both ends of the spectrum, leading to the development of the healthy and value-added channel management network. Adiance positions their clients to ensure that they progress in their desired direction, producing a stable and persistent growth of their consumer's companies.
Adiance has built its foundation on the principle to believe that it is its superior strength that drives the company's growth. Several years of expertise and the depth of knowledge gained and offered by the company's team of experts give Adiance a competitive edge, helping them serve clients better. Adiance invests its time and resources in building effective and happy working relationships with the clients with complete honesty and trustworthiness.
4G Mini Bullet Camera-
Adiance is also one of the best 4G Mini Bullet Camera manufacturers in the USA. Security camera manufacturers is integrated with an inbuilt SIM Card Slot and is best suitable for both outdoor and remote locations. Adiance manufactured 4G camera comes with FHD resolution and operates on 4G/LTE/Wi-Fi networks. It is an ideal video monitoring solution with no NVR/DVR, no wiring hassles, works when in areas with limited or no WiFi access.
The 4G security camera sends smart & Instant Motion Alerts and gets Real-Time spontaneously. Adiance 4G Mini Bullet smart cloud cameras are one of the best and professional surveillance systems for your workspace or residence monitoring. 4G Mini Bullet cameras work 24/7 via the cloud to help you monitor every minute of the day whether you are present there or not. The installation is much easier, so no need to call on professionals for the installation, thereby saving your costs. Adiance 4G Mini Bullet smart cameras come with unparalleled Wi-Fi video capabilities to secure your premises.
Excellent benefits of 4G mini bullet security camera-
Cloud/4G monitoring for optimum security and reliability
HD streams to make every minute detail visible
Save 80% of your storage
Low bandwidth costs
Remote monitoring from any location and at any time
Access live and real-time streams
Built-in motion detection to track every intruder
Digital Zoom in for a closer look at suspicious individuals and objects
Compact and space-saving
Wide Angle View for wide coverage
Beneficial features integrated with the camera-
FHD resolution
SD Card Support up to 64GB
Low Bandwidth Consumption
Plug and Play
Instant Alert system
Share and download videos
H.264 compression
Cloud storage
Live-stream view
No wires or cables
4G SIM Support
DIY and easy setup
Mobile application
Deployed applications of 4G mini bullet camera-
Factory and Malls monitoring
Offices and enterprises monitoring
Commercial buildings monitoring
Eateries and restaurants monitoring
Educational institutions monitoring
Clinics and medical institutions monitoring
Warehouses and storage spaces monitoring
Vehicle monitoring
Schools Bus and College monitoring
0 notes
southtech · 3 days ago
Text
7 Reasons Why Businesses Needs IT Network Support Services
In today’s competitive world, businesses need to leverage technology at some point or another to stay ahead. No matter the size of an organization, businesses can reap IT network support benefits and streamline their processes. It can also help businesses save money over time and keep up with the competition. The IT sector has come a long way since it was started, and it is not just bringing cost-effectiveness but also benefiting the business as a whole.
Tumblr media
Here are the top 7 reasons why companies should outsource IT network support services:
Reduce Business Costs
Whether you are starting a new business or running an established one, saving money is an essential phenomenon. A penny or two, business owners look for ways to spend less and earn as much return as they can. With outsourcing IT network support services, you will never encounter unexpected fees and consistent repairs that will yank up your business costs.
Choosing a support team can intensively increase your business aspect today, and you will have to pay according to your plan only.
Boosts Profits & Meet Business Goals
Maximizing efficiency and productivity is every business’s principal goal. No matter the business aspect, there is always room for improvement, and what’s a better driving force to move towards efficiency than technology. In the short term, it looks more like an investment, but it will help maximize company profits in the long run. At the same time, due to consistent bugs and issues, the efficiency might decrease. Therefore, hiring an experienced IT network support provider will be helpful.
Effective Turnaround Systems
If your business is operated through technology, there is always a chance of getting something wrong. When you have an experienced person just a call away, the minor jitters in the network and issues with software can be rightly addressed. Hiring a professional IT company can handle the day-to-day technical issues timely and allows you to focus on your unique selling proposition.
Disaster Recovery & Management
What better than addressing cyberattacks before they cost you hefty amounts of money? Hiring an IT expert can help you protect your business’s data from unlawful hackers and intruders. As technology is on the headway, hackers are also outrageously increasing. No one wants to put their business in jeopardy, therefore hire IT professionals to prevent data breaches.
They can take proactive action when any network security intrusion is detected, and if anything goes south, they also provide disaster recovery and backup services.
Expanded Spectrum of Resources
Maintaining secure network infrastructure and offering cutting-edge services is almost every business motto. So, why not businesses leave the technical issues addressed by someone who holds expertise at it and focuses on its core practices. Outsourcing these services will not only help the businesses to run smoothly but can help them enjoy expanded resources.
Regulatory Law Compliance
Nothing is too safe in today’s data protection world. There were millions of dollars being stolen by hackers since 2015, and few of them weren’t even traced back. Therefore, it became imperative for companies to stay updated with the governing rules and regulations and safeguard themselves from breaches. Hiring an IT network support service provider will help keep track of all these laws compliance properly. The network and server are adequately being audited, and proper due diligence is taken with data and confidential information.  
Specialize & Personalized Services
Every business’ need for IT services is quite different. With a knowledgeable and experienced team on board, you can get personalized services that are custom-made, keeping your business requirement and budget in mind. If you are not sure what kind of services your business will require, don’t worry, the experienced support team will guide you through and provide you with the best-suited services as per your business needs.
Technology is the dominator of the competitive world today. The businesses not updated with technology are termed as old-fashioned or outdated. One of the critical factors while accessing the business goals is technical support. In the past decade, technology has successfully helped businesses in maximizing their productivity and efficiency. Now that you are aware of the fruitful results that having an IT network supportteam can provide your business, you can look for the best provider.
Source URL:  https://www.darbaar.com/why-businesses-needs-it-network-support-services/
0 notes
songjihyo · 4 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Song Jihyo
Song Jihyo debuted with Whispering Corridors 3: Wishing Stairs (2003), the 3rd installment of Whispering Corridors series. Song played Yoon Jinsung, the second-best ballerina who attended an art high school. The actor made a strong impression by portraying the sensibilities of a sensitive, anxious adolescent girl who was like a loose cannon. Just like other star actors, Song acted both on screen and TV, and then she made a bold decision to appear in A Frozen Flower (2008), directed by Yoo Ha. Playing the queen of Goryeo from the Yuan Dynasty, Song depicted the elegant queen with her unique low voice and graceful image, a woman in love with the king’s guard, who happened to be the king’s lover. It was quite a tall order to convey the emotions of a woman who had to have an unwanted physical relationship with a man who stole her husband’s affection, ending up falling in love with him. But Song’s performance was well received.
Song gained a favorable impression by appearing in TV dramas, movies, and TV variety shows, building up her characters step by step in the male-dominant film world. She was the only female actor who appeared in New World (2013), which was full of seasoned male actors, and drew attention by playing Lee Shinwoo, an undercover agent with a graceful but chilling image. Although it was a minor role, the actor made her presence well felt through the scenes with her calm, dry reaction when her identity was revealed and with her facial expression when she was dying stuck in a barrel. Also, in What a Man Wants (2017), directed by Lee Byoungheon, and Unstoppable (2018), both with heavy male presence, Song never failed to showcase her acting chops. Miyoung in What a Man Wants, who belatedly found out her husband’s affair, or Jisoo in Unstoppable, who was kidnapped by a suspicious man and waited for her husband’s help, could have otherwise been a plain supporting character. However, Song established the characters to be a ‘strong-willed wife’ and breathed life into them.
Recently Song made an unusual choice again by appearing in A Frozen Flower. Previously, she showed a somewhat bright and goofy image in a long-lived TV show, but in Son Wonpyung’s mystery thriller Intruder (2020), the actor expanded her acting spectrum by giving off a grotesque atmosphere. Song played eerie Yujin, who came back home after 25-year of missing, gradually controlling the house. Expressing gruesome and sad emotions in her pretty face, Song grabbed the audience. She is a K-wave star enjoying popularity in Asia after shooting two films in China. With her fans saying she ‘works hard like a cow,’ the actor’s diligence and ambitions in acting in different genres are what makes her future even more promising. Jung Sujin
©theactorispresent.kr
5 notes · View notes
ledchipsworld · 9 days ago
Text
The limit is only your imagination
  The limit is only your imagination. They are also available in a large variety of colours. China LED Christmas Curtain Lights Suppliers A proper illumination can also make your whole place safer: keeping your house illuminated on the outside can protect it from intruders. The obvious reason is that they are highly energy saving. Installation is extremely easy, since you will not need any wires to run the lights. This is definitely a great feature of LEDs in general, but in a garden, where lights are literally within reach of kids and pets, it is even more important. First of all, their light can be very bright but soft as well. Article Tags: Beautifully Illuminated. LED lights for garden lighting can create a completely new atmosphere for your outdoor gatherings. To have your garden properly and beautifully illuminated with LED lights is a necessity and a pleasure at the same time. Alternatively, you can run these lights from small batteries, which is another compact solution for places which are rather shady. To have a beautifully illuminated garden while you are outside is not just useful in finding your way but also creates a unique atmosphere. The most frequent reason for using outdoor LED illumination is, however, decoration.
  At the same time this feature of LED lights does not only mean the advantage of using less energy to run your lights if they are connected to your mains or battery, but also draws in a couple of further advantages in installation and operation as well. LED strip lights are available in submersible, waterproof version, with which you can decorate your pond as well. With RGB technology, colour-changing LEDs are also available, giving you a wider spectrum of decorating your home and garden. Another additional advantage of LEDs deriving from low energy cost is their low voltage and cool running. This does not necessarily mean you have to run your lights all night long, but attached to a movement sensor, they will turn on whenever something is going on outside. LEDs are not only safe but cheap to run, and are available in the full spectrum of colours. LED lights also have a lifespan much longer than traditional lights, so with rechargeable or renewable sources of energy, you will be able to use them for several years to come. wWith these solutions, having these garden LED lights in your home will not mean an additional cost, your energy bills will not rise, yet you have a beautifully illuminated garden, which is cheap to run and require minimum maintenance. Both these functions can be crucial if you have kids or pets running around the lights, since they are safe to touch and harmless. Garden LED lights are available with attached solar panels, so they operate as a compact light and all you need to do is find a relatively sunny place to operate them. LED lights also provide different modes of lighting too. The best solution for decorating your garden with lights is definitely LED lights. LED lights consume so little energy compared to traditional forms of lighting that you can operate them with solar energy as well. If you have a proper LED lighting set up in your backyard, the place can become an integral part of your life after sunset too for parties, talks with friends or family gatherings
0 notes
cyanide-latte · 17 days ago
Text
Humor me a moment, okay? If you've been following my blog for a while (or if you decided to go through some of my tags on a whim) it's probably become obvious at some point that I love and adore the Shining duology by Stephen King. Don't get me started on the Kubrick film, I'm not making this post to open that salt mine. But whether you enjoy the books or not, whether you've read them or not, just humor me a moment.
It’s not something I often bring up but in the concept of a greater sort of horror’verse or terror’verse where various franchises, stories and canons intersect and merge, I adore the idea of trying to figure out what non-King characters would technically have abilities that fall under the umbrella of the Shining. And before you roll your eyes and keep scrolling, please just hear me out on why I tend towards these headcanons.
I grew up on superhero shit and various science-fantasy novels, and I need to state that for years growing up, powers on the psi spectrum in anything media I consumed were never really regarded in a positive light. At best, there’s an attempt to keep the concept neutral with the unsavory edge that characters with psionic powers often struggle with having them and unintentionally intrude on other’s privacy or cannot control their powers or try to shut themselves down in order to get their powers under control, at risk to themselves. At worst, the concept paints them villainous and terrifying, with the capability (and often the drive) to enslave humanity. They’re villains, pariahs, antagonists, or they’re anti-heroes struggling with morality, or they hate themselves for having these powers that they try to keep from inconveniencing others around them with.
King (at least from what of his works I’ve read) doesn’t do that to his characters with psionic abilities. And before you point a finger at Carrie White, Jack Torrance or Andy McGee, remember that Carrie (both the book and the character herself) is more the victim in her own story than anything a la Frankensteinian tragedy; and Andy McGee greatly dislikes causing harm to anybody but is ultimately driven to shelve his own sense of morality for the sake of his daughter. As for Jack, I’ve got an entirely separate shpiel about how I think he Shines, and I’ll go into that some other time if anybody is interested.
Those who Shine, even when their varying powers cause them dread or issues, are often portrayed as protagonists or helpful secondary or tertiary characters without whom the story wouldn’t be the same. Many of them are outright driven to use their abilities to help others. And they tend to draw others to them; certainly they seem to be beacons for danger, because many King antagonists view them as a threat or something to devour, but they’re also beacons of light for the people around them. It’s arguably one of the more meta reasons why the umbrella term for a huge spectrum of powers is called “Shining”.
And that’s not even getting into the fact that many characters who Shine are disabled and/or neurodivergent, and/or abuse survivors who are all the kinder and stronger for the fact that they Shine and that helps them to endure in the face of adversity.
Horror is—let’s be real here—flawed in many ways, same as any other genre of media. But the very idea that a spectrum of abilities often demonized or painted with overtones or undertones of negativity in other, more popular mainstream storytelling could literally be portrayed as such a bright thing in such a dark genre that taps into one of the most primal aspects of the human psyche? That something typically shown as anything from an inconvenience to everyone to a world-ending threat, could be such a powerful vehicle of hope and assistance, empathy and compassion? That shit fucks, guys.
3 notes · View notes
jkdoorsuk · 24 days ago
Text
The Art of Business Preservation
Where does it begin?
Self-preservation is a strong basic instinct. This instinct is easily observed in humans, animals and across the broader spectrum of nature. However, it's most commonly seen in humans - it's an intrinsic phenomenon that drives our societies. 
The preservation of one's culture and traditions is a form of self-preservation. Instilling values and morals that benefit society collectively too can be considered as factors contributing to preservation. It is the protection of objects , material and otherwise, which provide value to us that we find important to preserve. It is the fundamental nature  of humans and animals to behave in a manner that avoids loss and injury while maximizing the chances of survival. 
Tumblr media
This behaviour is also observed in the business world. Self-preservation here is a mindset integral to every organisational leader, as it helps protect their venture and all stakeholders involved. This is why, in a time as uncertain as we currently live in, businesses must adopt an outlook of self-preservation and take preventive measures to counter imminent threats. 
Where do we begin?
One such measure is the installation of rolling shutters in business establishments. While it may seem quite mundane to emphasize the importance of them, shutters help prevent theft, loss of life, loss of property and offer many other benefits that contribute to the preservation and profitability of a business. 
Roller shutters are shutters placed above doors and windows which roll vertically to open and close. These shutters are widely made out of horizontal steel or aluminium slats that are hinged together to reinforce the structure. Roller shutters can be operated both manually and remotely with the help of an electric motor. 
Warehouses, schools, office buildings, workshops, showrooms and many other commercial establishments using roller shutters enjoy stress-free security of their merchandise and property especially in periods where security personnel are absent. 
In the midst of the global pandemic, lockdowns have become a common occurrence resulting in the increased demand for adding additional mechanisms to protect idle inventory and merchandise. Especially in light of the  recent civil unrest, the United Kingdom has successfully demonstrated the need for businesses to protect their property and retail spaces. 
Roller shutters offer establishments comprehensive security from intruders and anti-social elements intent on damaging or stealing. These shutters are the first line of defence that prevent loss of life and property. Additionally  they are visual deterrents that discourage even seasoned burglars and rioters hell-bent on the destruction of property. 
While the safekeeping of merchandise and personnel is of extreme importance, another factor that hampers profitability is the ever-increasing energy cost. Shutters can be fitted with insulation foam that prevents the loss of heat , bringing down heating costs. Similarly, shutters prevent direct heat from the sun thus encouraging a cooler internal temperature and bringing down the cooling cost. 
The world is an indefinite place and circumstances can change for the worse at any moment. J.K Security Doors offers businesses the protection they need to ensure stability even in the most trying of times. Being established as industry leaders, J.K Security Doors equips establishments with durable defensive measures that add value to people and property. 
0 notes
indubitably-a-goblin · 29 days ago
Hi Mak!
I‘be taken a page out the the mysterious S’s book and wondered if you’d like to have a conversation with me via asks? Hope you don’t mind S!
I hope this isn’t bothersome, but my social anxiety prevents me from talking to most people, even online. Hopefully, my questions aren’t too intruding or personal for you, and I apologize if they are!
Since I’m struggling with my gender identity, I wanted to know when you found out you were pansexual? I’d also like to know what it means to be so? I know that bisexual is that you love males, females, an non-binaries, and I thought those were the only three genders. If I’m not wrong, pansexual is all genders, and I’m aware of neopronouns, but I don’t think that they’re different genders? Please correct me if I’m wrong, and I know you’re probably not an expert and not the right person to ask for this, but I was just wondering.
Another, completely different topic question I have is, how many followers do you have and when did you start your account? I’m not trying to be competitive or criticize or something, I’m just curious as I can’t seem to see if tumblr shows the amount of followers someone has.
Jumping topics again like parkour, do you like anime? And if so, which shows?
I have more questions, but I feel like that would be intruding a bit too much, and a very long ask. Sorry for this completely random ask!
Hoping you have a good day,
-R
new friend! hello R!
let’s learn some things! having a gender crisis is always a blast /s (but seriously, good luck! remember that it’s always okay to experiment with different pronouns and genders. it’s a big ol’ spectrum :D) I found out I was pansexual over quarantine last year, and traditionally that means that I can be attracted to all genders without having a specific taste within each gender. Omnisexual, pansexual, and bisexual are all very similar and their definitions have developed a lot over time. I basically chose pansexual because I prefer the label over the others. And yeah! There’s TONS of genders out there. There’s women, men, nonbinary, genderfluid, no gender, ALL gender, maybe gender, and tons more. I’m cis, and so I don’t feel like the right person to educate my followers on this. Feel free to do some research to learn more!  Neopronouns help people express themselves in ways that the traditional pronouns can’t, and it’s always important to respect someone’s pronouns (as i’m sure you know). So, yes: there are more than three genders
I reached my 101st follower today, actually, and that’s pretty exciting. One of the great features of Tumblr (/gen) is that they don’t show follower counts.
I’ve never gotten onto the anime train, to be honest. The art style is very distracting for me and it makes it hard for me to focus on the plot. My best friend loves anime though so I know the plots to most of them (infodumping my beloved)
nice to talk to you!
0 notes
assured-blog · a month ago
Text
High Tech Safes Guide
Gone are the days of big handles and synchronized turns of the key. With a little connectivity and modern engineering, keeping your treasured possessions and documents safe in your home safe is a simple and straightforward matter.
Below is the latest in smart safe technology.
Vaultek
Vaultek smart   safes  combine a perfect form of intruder fighting with high-tech functionality. These robust, secure and stylish safes offer multiple means of entry (biometrics, ID code, password) but their app-based skills are what really shine. In addition to granting instant access to priceless items with a simple swipe , the  Vaultek Smart App gives owners the ability to manage all major functions of the security device. Users can easily customize entry protocols (on-demand versus progressive, lock patterns, etc.) and track usage, including who opened the box and for how long they had access. The app also keeps owners updated on battery life and of course possible tampering.
Vaultek smart safes range from $ 139 to $ 499, depending on the model.
The Brown Safe Estate Series
Those who value customization and style through connectivity should take a look at  the Estate series from Brown Safes.. Watches, jewelry, documents, weapons - any and all combinations will work for this high-end, high-capacity, secure storage solution. But customization doesn't end with what you'll keep in the safe. Brown Safe Estate shoppers will have an almost endless selection of custom options to choose from, including interior and exterior finishes, hardwoods for jewelry drawers and interior trim, and fabrics for interior walls, shelves, and drawer liners. Watch collectors can take advantage of the devices to keep Orbita's mechanical watches running. Even the entry method is up to the owner, with an electronic keypad, biometric fingerprint lock, and mechanical dialing all available as a means of access.
The price of the safes in the Brown Safe Estate series depends on the size and features. More information is available at BrownSafe.com.
Döttling Narcissus
There's style and customization ... and then there's  the Döttling Narcissus — a singular vision that is the pinnacle of luxury protection. Conceived by fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld and created in collaboration with high-end safe builder Döttling, the Narcissus is a minimalist, nearly six-foot-tall (1.80-meter) monolith of chrome-plated aluminum. When the intimidating and impregnable safe identifies its owner, it automatically opens two butterfly doors to reveal two handcrafted cabinets stocked with a set of jewelry boxes and watch gadgets.
Only 30 models of the Narcissus were made, and Lagerfeld kept one for him, and the safest work of art in the world will cost him 250,000 euros (or roughly $ 290,000).
Master Lock Bluetooth
And on the opposite side of the spending spectrum, there's the  Master Lock Bluetooth.. If a safe feels like an indulgence, or an overreaction, but you would like to simply and intelligently store some valuables in another storage medium, you won't find a better solution than Master Lock's Bluetooth series. This ingenious padlock eliminates the need for keys, allowing users to easily unlock the security device by touching it while their phone is in range. Has your phone been discharged while playing Candy Crush? No problem. The Master Lock Bluetooth also includes a directional keypad - just enter the correct sequence for instant unlock. Better yet, Master Lock owners can create temporary or permanent profiles for other users, allowing you to grant limited access or long-term access to friends, relatives or neighbors. Owners can also track lock usage through the Master Lock app and receive real-time tampering notifications anywhere in the world.
0 notes
importantfurystarlight · a month ago
Text
Avast Security Pro For Mac Deals
Tumblr media
When you purchase Avast Premium Security (previously Avast Security Pro), you need to manually activate your subscription using either a valid activation code or by logging into your Avast Account.
Avast Free Mac Security Review
Avast Security For Mac Download
Avast Software For Mac
Avast Security Pro for Mac review: Everything a modern antivirus app needs and a little bit more An all-around champion has strong malware-fighting abilities packaged with worthwhile extras. $39.99 - US Avast Business Antivirus Pro. Shop this offer from Avast Software and find everything you need. US avast business antivirus pro was: $49.99 now: $39.99.
Before you begin activation, ensure the latest version of Avast Security is installed on your Mac. For detailed installation instructions, refer to the following article:
Activate Avast Premium Security for Mac
Your activation code can be located in a number of different places depending on your purchase method. For example, in an order confirmation email, on an activation card, or within another Avast product. For instructions on how to locate your activation code, refer to the following article:
To activate Avast Premium Security with an activation code:
Tumblr media
After installing Avast Security, click Activate paid features. Alternatively, double-click the Avast icon in your Applications folder, then go to ☰ Menu ▸ Activate paid features.
Click in the text box, then type or paste in your activation code, and click Activate.
To activate Avast Premium Security with an Avast Account:
After installing Avast Security, click Activate paid features. Alternatively, double-click the Avast icon in your Applications folder, then go to ☰ Menu ▸ Log in to Avast account.
Enter your Avast Account email and password, then click Log In. Alternatively, click Facebook or Google to log in using these credentials instead.
Your Avast Premium Security subscription is now activated.
Further recommendations
To transfer your subscription to a different Mac, uninstall Avast Premium Security from your Mac before you activate your subscription on the alternative Mac. For reinstallation instructions, refer to the following articles:
Troubleshoot activation issues
In some cases, subscription synchronization may take up to 24 hours after purchase. If your subscription is still not active after this time, refer to the following article:
Avast Premium Security 14.x for Mac
Apple macOS 10.14.x (Mojave)
Apple macOS 10.13.x (High Sierra)
Apple macOS 10.12.x (Sierra)
Apple Mac OS X 10.11.x (El Capitan)
Apple Mac OS X 10.10.x (Yosemite)
Avast Security Pro (for Mac)
Editor Rating: Good (3.0)
US Street Price$60.00
Pros
Certified by one independent testing lab. Speedy full scan. Useful bonus features. Ransomware protection. Wi-Fi intruder detection.
Cons
Doesn't add much to free edition's features. Expensive. Poor scores in phishing protection test. Password manager includes only basic features.
Bottom Line
Avast Security Pro (for Mac) adds ransomware protection and Wi-Fi intruder detection to the features found in Avast's free antivirus, but these additions don't merit its high price.
The myth that Macs can't suffer viruses, Trojans, or other types of malware attack is busted. Oh, the situation isn't nearly as bad as on Windows or Android, but Macs really do need antivirus protection. There are free options available, including Avast Security (for Mac), but commercial antivirus utilities offer more features and do better in testing. Looking at what this product adds beyond the features in the free edition, it's really hard to justify the price.
This product's main window looks exactly like that of the free edition, except for the absence of the upgrade offer. Plenty of white space surrounds a simple security status indicator. The left-rail menu is also the same as in the free edition. The difference is that clicking Ransomware Shield or Wi-Fi Inspector brings up the component, rather than displaying an upgrade invitation. The look is very different from that of Avast Pro Antivirus, which uses a dark gray background with occasional elements in purple and green.
Avast Free Mac Security Review
SEE ALSO: The 10 Most Pirated Movies
Pricing and OS Support
Like Bitdefender and Kaspersky, Avast supports macOS versions back to 10.9 (Mavericks). If you have an antique Mac that for some reason can't even run Mavericks, consider ESET, ProtectWorks, or ClamXav—all of which support versions of macOS from 10.6 (Snow Leopard) on. At the other end of the spectrum, Avira, Trend Micro, and Symantec Norton Security Deluxe (for Mac) require macOS 10.11 (El Capitan) or better.
The most common pricing plan for Mac antivirus runs $39.99 per year for one license or $59.99 for three. Bitdefender, ESET Cyber Security (for Mac), Kaspersky, and Malwarebytes all fit this profile. Price-wise, Avast is on the high end, at $59.99 per year or $69.99 for three licenses. That's expensive, considering that the free edition has all the same features except for Ransomware Shield and Wi-Fi Inspector, which I'll detail below.
Shared Features
This utility shares all the features of the free Avast Security (for Mac), and that's saying a lot. I'll briefly summarize those shared features here, and you can should read my review of the free product for more details.
AV-Comparatives certified Avast's Mac malware protection as effective. In testing, it protected against 99.9 percent of Mac malware and 100 percent of Windows malware. AV-Test Institute, the other major lab that tests Mac antivirus, did not include Avast in testing. Note, though, that Bitdefender and Kaspersky earned 100 percent in both tests, and received certification from both labs.
I don't have the same kind of resources for antivirus testing under macOS as I do for Windows. I did try scanning a folder containing my current collection of Windows malware. Avast detected and quarantined 85 percent of the samples, which is quite good. Only Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus (for Mac), with 86 percent, and Sophos, with 100 percent, have done better. At the low end, McAfee caught 25 percent and Intego just 18 percent.
Avast's full scan finished in 14.5 minutes, which is quite a bit faster than the current average of 24 minutes. The impressive Home Network Security Scanner took less than three minutes to take note of all devices on my network. It found 36 devices and flagged legitimate security problems on two of them.
Phishing websites masquerade as secure sites in the hopes of fooling you into giving away your login credentials. It doesn't matter which browser you use, or which operating system. Avast's scores in my hands-on phishing protection test were extremely poor. The phishing protection systems built into Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer all outperformed Avast, by a long shot.
I learned from my company contacts that phishing protection is fully functional in Chrome and Firefox, but only partly in Safari. The developers are working up a browser-independent version. In a new test using Chrome, Avast scored better than any Mac product except Bitdefender. It tied with Norton and beat out all three browsers. If you're relying on Avast for phishing protection, make sure you use Chrome or Firefox.
The Online Security browser extension marks up search results to flag dangerous links. It also displays a list of all ad trackers and other trackers on the current page, with an option to actively block these. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac includes a similar active Do Not Track feature.
Avast comes with a basic password manager that installs as a separate application. It handles basic functions like password capture and replay, saving secure notes, and generating strong passwords. The app stores passwords locally, but you can set up syncing between all your macOS, iOS, Windows, and Android devices. However, you won't find any advanced features like secure password sharing, two-factor authentication, or password inheritance.
Ransomware Shield
Everything I've described to this point is also available in the free edition. The premium-only Ransomware Shield component simply prevents unauthorized access to files in sensitive folders. By default, it protects the Documents and Pictures folders for the current user. Naturally, you can add other folders if needed. A similar feature in Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac also protects your Time Machine backups.
To test this kind of access control on Windows, I use a small text editor that I wrote myself, something that would never show up on a list of trusted applications. I don't have such a program for macOS, so I had to disable the feature that automatically trusts Apple and App Store applications.
Operation is very simple. When an untrusted program tries to modify a protected app, Avast pops up a warning. If you've just installed and launched a new photo editor, click Allow. If you don't recognize the program, click Block. Note that clicking Allow only makes the program trusted temporarily. To ensure that new photo editor doesn't get blocked, you must manually add it to the list of Allowed Apps.
This type of access control is an effective tool for ransomware protection, one used by many security tools both on Windows and macOS. However, it does require vigilance on your part. When you see the Ransomware Shield popup, examine it carefully, and only click Allow if you're absolutely sure the program is legitimate.
Wi-Fi Inspector
As noted, you get the Home Network Security Scan even in the free edition. The premium edition adds a component called Wi-Fi Inspector. Despite the name, the main function of this component is to alert you when new devices join the network. It maintains its own simple list of devices. If you click Deep Scan, it launches the Home Network Security Scan.
Wi-Fi Inspector's device list doesn't identify security issues the way the security scan does. On the plus side, it lists the MAC address and IP address for each device, along with the name. For many devices, the name is a clear identification, like neils-ipad or all-in-one-pc, but some come out with names like unknown6542990b6483. If you have basic network skills, you can use those addresses to figure out which device corresponds to a weird name. Bitdefender Home Scanner (a Windows utility) lets you edit such entries to give them a friendly name, and even remembers the name on subsequent scans. With Avast, you'll just have to keep a list of which device matches which weird name.
I did encounter a serious problem with the device list. It found 36 devices on my network, but I couldn't scroll down to see more than the first bunch of devices. My Avast contact confirmed this as a bug. It's not such a big problem, as you can see all your connected devices in network scanner.
The real point of Wi-Fi Inspector is to alert you when a new device connects. Just after installation, you'll probably see quite a few of these, as devices that were turned off during the initial scan wake up. Once you get past that shakeout period, you should pay close attention to the new-device notifications. If you don't recognize the device, it could be a neighbor mooching your Wi-Fi, or even a hack attempt.
If you determine that the new connection isn't legitimate, there's not a lot you can do about it. Wi-Fi Inspector offers notification, but no direct way to act on that information. Your best bet is to snap a screenshot of the notification and then find a friend who's a network whiz. Your buddy can use the info from the screenshot to log into your router's settings and ban the device from the network.
Doesn't Add Enough
Avast Security Pro offers certified Mac malware protection, a network security scanner, and a password manager, but those features also come with the free Avast Security. The Pro edition adds ransomware protection that works by banning untrusted applications from modifying your files. It also adds real-time notification of new connections to your network, but offers no way to do anything if you determine the new connection is perfidious. That's not much for $59.99 per year. The only reason to buy this product is if you want to protect your Macs in a business setting, but in that case, you can get better protection for less.
Avast Security For Mac Download
Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac has certification from two labs, excellent phishing protection, an anti-ransomware feature much like Avast's, and more. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac also has two certifications, and it comes with a full parental control system, excellent anti-phishing, protection against webcam peepers, and more. These are our Editors' Choice products for macOS antivirus, and they both costs $20 less than Avast.
Avast Security Pro (for Mac)
Avast Software For Mac
Bottom Line: Avast Security Pro (for Mac) adds ransomware protection and Wi-Fi intruder detection to the features found in Avast's free antivirus, but these additions don't merit its high price.
Tumblr media
0 notes
123stylica · 2 months ago
Text
WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE METAL DESIGN ART FOR THE DOOR?
Whether for household exterior designs or industrial exterior designs, many of us tend to overlook that exteriors are as important as interiors.
Whether you are planning an exterior renovation or placing your house on sale, you will want to beautify your home from inside and out.
In this guide, we are specifically going to talk about the unknown benefits of
metal entry doors.
Let's assume steel and stainless steel as the metal for the purpose of this guide.
Tumblr media
WHY METAL DOORS?
1. DURABILITY AND RESISTANCE.
Comparatively, the entry door is most used in any house. Hence, it is more likely to be prone to cracks, wear and tear. A strong metal like steel and stainless steel ensures durability. It results in longevity making it an affordable option.
The changing climate can play against your door. The metal design art can hold moisture well, hence it is profoundly used in household and manufacturing applications.
Metal doors are the perfect elements for your entry door if you reside in a changing, moist climate.
2. METAL DESIGN ART SATISFIES CENTREPIECE AESTHETIC REQUIREMENTS.
The entry door is the standpoint of every residential and commercial property. To form the best first impression on the visitors, grab the best entry door around.
The metal design art has a pool of options. Which makes it a superior option from an aesthetic view. Make sure to choose the perfect metal design art for your doors.
Metal doors are meant to last forever. A good choice can make your house complete and a bad choice can ruin it.
Uphold the value of your property for years to come with the best metal door designs. You can find aesthetically unique designs on
Stylica.org.
3. METAL DESIGN ART IS HYGIENE-ORIENTED.
Hygiene concerns are on the rise. The entry door and door articles are potential sources of germs transmission. Hence, you can opt for the metal that doesn't support transmission. Like steel, stainless steel.  
Steel and stainless steel is non-porous metal. It doesn't withhold dust, grime and germs for a longer time. Which makes it a good option for the door and the door accessories.
With the metal door, it is easier to uphold hygiene. Hence, family and office care are more manageable with the metal door.
Tumblr media
4. COST-EFFECTIVE SOLUTION.
In comparison with the other door materials, metal doors require less maintenance which satisfies aesthetic appeal and its durability makes homeowners and decorators a favourite option to rely on.
With the wide spectrum of variety, you can opt for metal design art, which is both economical and catchy.  
Steel and stainless steel are strong and sturdy metal. Which ensures its endurance. So if you are looking for a long-lasting, hassle-free metal door, metal is a good option.
5. ABSORPTIVE SOUND BARRIER.
Privacy is the most valuable element in a happy family. Wooden and fibreglass entry door is proven to be less effective in sound reduction.
By blocking the soundwaves metal makes your property a soundproof property. The metal is employed in both industrial and household application.
Stainless steel and regular steel is an ideal modern solution against noise.
6. HIGHER SECURITY.
Irrespective of the metropolitan area you reside in, security is the primary concern of every resident. While the wooden door is easily breakable, due to the strength, metal has been everyone's first choice for security.
With a suitable metal design art, you can relax in the house knowing that no intruder can break through your strong metal door.
Another reason why metal is a favourite choice of homeowners is, it cuts down on your security measures. Although, you can have multiple security measures if you wish to.
Tumblr media
7. FIRE RESISTANCE.
Metal has a non-combustible advantage. In case of fire, it does not combust. Whereas alternative materials such as wood, aluminium, are more likely to catch fire in case.
The great amount of chromium in the steel and stainless steel makes it the most fire-resistant material.
It also has a high-melting-point which makes stainless steel a great option for fire safety.
8.CORROSION RESISTANCE.
Metal is highly renowned for its corrosion resistance and high strength. With the considerable presence of oxidised chromium, it makes a protective layer over the metal. These metals are directly related to increasing corrosion resistance.
Modern online metal artisans provide coated metal design arts to prevent corrosion. Steel and stainless steel are self-cleaning metals. Though, we recommend timely cleaning to prevent early corrosion.
9. LOW MAINTENANCE ENTRY DOOR SELECTION.
Metal requires low maintenance. Thanks to the life-improving coating layers that keep the dirt away.
The metal retains its original shape and size in all weather conditions, unlike wood which expands and contracts in specific weather types.
Other than the door, the hardware comes with easy fixes, which results in a feasible and cost-saving option over time.
INSTALLATION:
We recommend professional assistance in installing metal design art doors safely and rightfully. Stylica.org's security doors come with easy installation articles. ​
Tumblr media
FINAL THOUGHTS,
Picking an aesthetically suitable, long-lasting metal design art for your entry door can be a painful task. Among the versatile options available in the online and offline market, we suggest steel and stainless steel is the ideal choice.
Because unlike wood and fibreglass, it is fire-resistant, low-cost maintenance, with good sound absorption quality. And more importantly, it is hygiene oriented.
Placing aesthetic steel doors can also grab you a good price value for your house.
Moreover, you can spend less on other security applications relying on strong steel.
The bottom line is steel and stainless steel fulfils all the needs of a qualified entry door. If you are looking for safety, fire and sound resistant, at a reasonable cost, you know what to pick!  
Find creative entry doors on Stylica.org.
3 notes · View notes
luvyanfei · 2 months ago
EVEEEEE CONGRATS ON THE NEW BLOG I HOPE YOULL HAVE LOTS OF FUN WRITING 💜💜💜💜 Let’s see though,,, for my request,,, May I request hcs of Vil x a reader who’s a graphic designer and she edits his magicam posts and whatnot 👀💖
ue ue,,, forgive me if i mischaracterize vil. i also got a bit carried away and this ended up kind of lengthy. thank you vivian! <3
VIL SCHOENHEIT.
when vil finds out about your apparent talent, he’s impressed, to say the least. he knows how diligent you are with your studies, he’s seen with his own eyes the way you organize your notes proficiently and listen thoughtfully during lectures. the effort you pour into your academics is an admiring trait. he’s just, never thought you’re skilled in the creative side of the spectrum as well.
as usual, he’s having difficulties trying to outshine his competitor, neige leblanche. with rook’s advice, he sought out to spice up his contents and produce something that will successfully attract the public’s eye. newer is better, as the saying goes. he exits out to the school’s library after class has finished for the tiresome day to reflect and craft up a plan. he doesn’t expect to see you sitting down on one of the desks, typing things down on your computer once he gets there. ah. you must be starting the new assignment crewel has assigned, he guesses. well, that’s what he thinks, until he walks past you to secretly glance at the screen you’re focusing all your attention on which are, e-edits? how... intriguing. vil can’t help but be silently amused as he watches you skillfully colour in images and create appealing layouts. gears suddenly turn in his head and he ponders deep in thought, inspiration hitting him hard.
“vil, what are you looking at?” shoot. he’s so absorbed in your work that he fails to realize you’ve spotted him staring.
“potato, you’re quite good at editing.” he crosses his arms nonchalantly, nodding his head to gesture to your laptop. you sheepishly look down at the ground and a faint blush dusts your cheeks.
waving your hands in front of you, you rebuke his compliment. “no no. i’m not, really. you’re the one who’s talented between the two of us.”
ah, so you’re the insecure type. he clear his throat to change the topic, much to your relief. “anyways, i’ve been having a bit of a dilemma concerning my posts, lately.” he carefully explains the situation at hand and you nod along. “well, care to lend me a hand. i’m positive you have the skill to make promising results.”
you’re astounded, for a brief moment. vil schoenheit, one of the most popular social media icons in the school and your secret crush, is asking you for help? still in shock, you accept his proposal nonetheless, a wave of excitement washing over the prickling doubt in your head. and that’s how you became his personal graphic designer and your relationship with him takes a more positive turn towards the romantic light.
as you work and combine your talents together, vil admittingly forms a budding affection for you which blossoms into a full-on crush. how can he not? your effervescent smile that emanates warmth as you’re editing the latest posts he’s going to publish for the day gives him a rush of tingling happiness and he reciprocates your smile with a tiny beam of his own, highlighting his beauty.
he tries to pay you back with cash or gifts, but you quickly shake your head and reassure him that he’s worth the time. plus, you’re quite fond of editing so it’s killing two birds with one stone. he makes sure to at least credit you since it would be inconsiderate of him to take all the glory for himself.
after days of preparation and hard work, vil posts the finished products for all to see while you watch him in anticipation. immediately, your budding anxiety is quenched down by the multiple notification noises of his phone and, to both of your amazement, his posts have received generous number of hearts and comments filled with genuine praise in under a minute. what’s most surprising is the fact that he has now gained almost more than the massive followers that neige has. almost. vil should be feeling bitter and scornful for not being more popular than the rsa student is, but he’s... content. after all, he has something - or rather, someone, that neige will never have - and that’s you.
he strives for perfection, and he hopes you - his cherished lover and adoring graphic designer - excel too. it’s always better to journey hand in hand to the top instead of venturing alone, right?
you’re busy typing away on your laptop, concentrating hard on perfecting the edits for vil. the sky outside is dark and the moonlight beams through the many windows in the room. your eyes feel heavy and it’s tempting to close them to give way to slumber, yet you force yourself to battle against your drowsiness. the knocking of the door alerts you to turn around to the source of the intruder as vil himself swiftly enters pomefiore’s common area with a mug of hot cocoa in one hand.
“ara ara, potato, what are you doing up so late?” he places the cup down beside you and grips your shoulders firmly, yet gently, pressing your back against his chest as he straightens your posture. you automatically blush at the close proximity and offers him a little smile.
“i was trying to finish the work for today,” you gesture to your open laptop, ushering him to view your unfinished edit. he studies it closely. beauté as always, he muses to himself, just like you.
you take a sip and breathes out a sigh of satisfaction, letting the decadent taste of the drink trickle down your throat. he cups your chin and his lilac pupils bore into yours. unhesitating, he captures your lips in his perfectly, interlocking his tongue with yours for good measure. your eyes widen for a split second, but you close them reflexively and slings your arms around his neck to further deepen the intimate moment.  
you stay together like this for a few full minutes, until he pulls away reluctantly. “[name],” his fingers comb through your hair, as if to lull you asleep, “don’t overwork yourself. you may have your flaws, but that’s what i find so endearing about you. rest now, my love.”
and with that, he seals your day with a fluttering kiss to your forehead before you finally drift into unconsciousness.
75 notes · View notes
shinyvoidgalaxy · 2 months ago
Text
Guy Falls With Auto Tune
Tumblr media
Guy Falls With Auto Tune Online
Guy Falls Off Stage With Auto Tune
Guy Falls With Auto Tune Youtube
Apr 25, 2014  Auto-Tune became a gimmick for viral videos: The biggest Auto-Tune song of 2010 was a YouTube clip known as “The Bed Intruder Song,” a viral video made from re. Jun 20, 2018  Watch Billie Eilish and Her Family Talk About How They Make Music Diary of a Song - Duration: 8:03. The New York Times Recommended for you. Auto-Tune Pro is the most complete and advanced edition of Auto-Tune. It includes Auto Mode, for real-time correction and effects, Graph Mode, for detailed pitch and time editing, and the Auto-Key plug-in for automatic key and scale detection. Listen close and you can hear the artifacts from the pitch correction on almost every album from Fall Out Boy and PATD. For newer examples, Centuries and AB/AP for FOB, and Death of a Bachelor and Victorious for PATD. TTYG was also wrought with auto-tune since Patrick was still discovering his voice. Nov 13, 2014  T-Pain Rises Above The Haters After initial success, the 30-year-old singer and songwriter, known for his Auto-Tuned hits, became a target for derision. It took time but now he's made it clear: 'I.
Sep 27, 2018 50+ videos Play all Mix - Travis Scott Autotune FALL REMIX YouTube travis scott being high for 3 minutes straight while kylie quizzes him - Duration: 3:10. Bitch Recommended for you.
Free rocketbowl game download. In January of 2010, Kesha Sebert, known as ‘Ke$ha’ debuted at number one on Billboard with her album, Animal. Her style is electro pop-y dance music: she alternates between rapping and singing, the choruses of her songs are typically melodic party hooks that bore deep into your brain: “Your love, your love, your love, is my drug!” And at times, her voice is so heavily processed that it sounds like a cross between a girl and a synthesizer. Much of her sound is due to the pitch correction software, Auto-Tune.
Sebert, whose label did not respond to a request for an interview, has built a persona as a badass wastoid, who told Rolling Stone that all male visitors to her tour bus had to submit to being photographed with their pants down. Even the bus drivers.
Yet this past November on the Today Show, the 25-year old Sebert looked vulnerable, standing awkwardly in her skimpy purple, gold, and green unitard. She was there to promote her new album, Warrior, which was supposed to reveal the authentic her.
“Was it really important to let your voice to be heard?” asked the host, Savannah Guthrie.
“Absolutely,” Sebert said, gripping the mic nervously in her fingerless black gloves.
https://everlending582.weebly.com/blog/dropbox-uf-mac-app. “People think they’ve heard the Auto-Tune, they’ve heard the dance hits, but you really have a great voice, too,” said Guthrie, helpfully.
“No, I got, like, bummed out when I heard that,” said Sebert, sadly. “Because I really can sing. It’s one of the few things I can do.”
Warrior starts with a shredding electrical static noise, then comes her voice, sounding like what the Guardian called “a robo squawk devoid of all emotion.”
“That’s pitch correction software for sure,” wrote Drew Waters, Head of Studio Operations at Capitol Records, in an email. “She may be able to sing, but she or the producer chose to put her voice through Auto-Tune or a similar plug-in as an aesthetic choice.”
So much for showing the world the authentic Ke$ha.
Since rising to fame as the weird techno-warble effect in the chorus of Cher’s 1998 song, “Believe,” Auto-Tune has become bitchy shorthand for saying somebody can’t sing. But the diss isn’t fair, because everybody’s using it.
For every T-Pain — the R&B artist who uses Auto-Tune as an over-the-top aesthetic choice — there are 100 artists who are Auto-Tuned in subtler ways. Fix a little backing harmony here, bump a flat note up to diva-worthy heights there: smooth everything over so that it’s perfect. You can even use Auto-Tune live, so an artist can sing totally out of tune in concert and be corrected before their flaws ever reach the ears of an audience. (On season 7 of the UK X-Factor, it was used so excessively on contestants’ auditions that viewers got wise, and protested.)
Indeed, finding out that all the singers we listen to have been Auto-Tuned does feel like someone’s messing with us. As humans, we crave connection, not perfection. But we’re not the ones pulling the levers. What happens when an entire industry decides it’s safer to bet on the robot? Will we start to hate the sound of our own voices?
They’re all zombies!
They’re all zombies!
Auto-Tune has now become bitchy shorthand for saying somebody can’t sing
Cher’s late ‘90s comeback and makeover as a gay icon can entirely be attributed to Auto-Tune, though the song's producers claimed for years that it was a Digitech Talker vocoder pedal effect. In 1998, she released the single, “Believe,” which featured a strange, robotic vocal effect on the chorus that felt fresh. It was created with Auto-Tune.
The technology, which debuted in 1997 as a plug-in for Pro Tools (the industry standard recording software), works like this: you select the key the song is in, and then Auto-Tune analyzes the singer’s vocal line, moving “wrong” notes up or down to what it guesses is the intended pitch. You can control the time it takes for the program to move the pitch: slower is more natural, faster makes the jump sudden and inhuman sounding. Cher’s producers chose the fastest possible setting, the so-called “zero” setting, for maximum pop.
“Believe” was a huge hit, but among music nerds, it was polarizing. Indie rock producer Steve Albini, who’s recorded bands like the Pixies and Nirvana, has said he thought the song was mind-numbingly awful, and was aghast to see people he respected seduced by Auto-Tune.
Guy Falls With Auto Tune Online
“One by one, I could see that my friends had gone zombie. This horrible piece of music with this ugly soon-to-be cliché was now being discussed as something that was awesome. It made my heart fall,” he told the Onion AV Club in November of 2012.
The Auto-Tune effect spread like a slow burn through the industry, especially within the R&B and dance music communities. T-Pain began Cher-style Auto-Tuning all his vocals, and a decade later, he’s still doing it.
“It’s makin’ me money, so I ain’t about to stop!” T-Pain told DJ Skee in 2008.
“It’s makin’ me money, so I ain’t about to stop!”
Kanye West did an album with it. Lady Gaga uses it. Madonna, too. Maroon 5. Even the artistically high-minded Bon Iver has dabbled. A YouTube series where TV news clips were Auto-Tuned, “Auto-Tune the News”, went viral. The glitchy Auto-Tune mode seems destined to be remembered as the “sound” of the 2000s, the way the gated snare (that dense, big, reverb-y drum sound on, say, Phil Collinssongs) is now remembered as the sound of the ‘80s.
Auto-Tune certainly isn’t the only robot voice effect to have wormed its way into pop music. In the ‘70s and early ‘80s, voice synthesizer effects units became popular with a lot of bands. Most famous is the Vocoder, originally invented in the 1930s to send encoded Allied messages during WWII. Proto-techno groups like New Order and Kraftwerk (ie: “Computer World,”) embraced it. So did American early funk and hip hop groups like the Jonzun Crew.
‘70s rockers gravitated towards another effect, the talk box. Peter Frampton (listen for it on “Do you Feel Like We Do”) and Joe Walsh (used it on “Rocky Mountain Way”) liked its similar-to-a-vocoder sound. The talk box was easier to rig up than the Vocoder — you operate it via a rubber mouth tube when applying it to vocals. But it produces massive amounts of slobber. In Dave Tompkins’ book, How to Wreck a Nice Beach, about the history of synthesized speech machines in the music industry, he writes that Frampton’s roadies sanitized his talk box in Remy Martin Cognac between gigs.
The use of showy effects usually have a backlash. And in the case of the Auto-Tune warble, Jay-Z struck back with the 2009 single, D.O.A., or “Death of Auto-Tune.”
I know we facing a recession But the music y'all making going make it the great depression All y'all lack aggression Put your skirt back down, grow a set man Nigga this shit violent This is death of Auto-Tune, moment of silence
That same year, the band Death Cab for Cutie showed up at the Grammys wearing blue ribbons to raise awareness, they told MTV, about “rampant Auto-Tune abuse.”
The protests came too late, though. The lid to Pandora’s box had been lifted. Music producers everywhere were installing the software.
Everybody uses it
Everybody uses it
“I’ll be in a studio and hear a singer down the hall and she’s clearly out of tune, and she’ll do one take,” says Drew Waters of Capitol Records. That’s all she needs. Because they can fix it later, in Auto-Tune.
There is much speculation online about who does — or doesn’t — use Auto-Tune. Taylor Swift is a key target, as her terribly off-key duet with Stevie Nicks at the 2010 Grammys suggests she’s tone deaf. (Label reps said at the time something was wrong with her earpiece.) But such speculation is naïve, say the producers I talked to. “Everybody uses it,” says Filip Nikolic, singer in the LA-based band, Poolside, and a freelance music producer and studio engineer. “It saves a ton of time.”
On one end of the spectrum are people who dial up Auto-Tune to the max, a la Cher / T-Pain. On the other end are people who use it occasionally and sparingly. You can use Auto-Tune not only to pitch correct vocals, but other instruments too, and light users will tweak a note here and there if a guitar is, say, rubbing up against a vocal in a weird way.
“I’ll massage a note every once in a while, and often I won’t even tell the artist,” says Eric Drew Feldman, a San Francisco-based musician and producer who’s worked with The Polyphonic Spree and Frank Black.
But between those two extremes, you have the synthetic middle, where Auto-Tune is used to correct nearly every note, as one integral brick in a thick wall of digitally processed sound. From Justin Bieber to One Direction, from The Weeknd to Chris Brown, most pop music produced today has a slick, synth-y tone that’s partly a result of pitch correction.
However, good luck getting anybody to cop to it. Big producers like Max Martin and Dr. Luke, responsible for mega hits from artists like Ke$ha, Pink, and Kelly Clarkson, either turned me down or didn’t respond to interview requests. And you can’t really blame them.
“Do you want to talk about that effect you probably use that people equate with your client being talentless?”
Um, no thanks.
In 2009, an online petition went around protesting the overuse of Auto-Tune on the show Glee. Those producers turned down an interview, too.
The artists and producers who would talk were conflicted. One indie band, The Stepkids, had long eschewed Auto-Tune and most other modern recording technologies to make what they call “experimental soul music.” But the band recently did an about face, and Auto-Tuned their vocal harmonies on their forthcoming single, “Fading Star.”
Were they using Auto-Tune ironically or seriously? Co-frontman Jeff Gitelman said,
“Both.”
“For a long time we fought it, and we still are to a certain degree,” said Gitelman. “But attention spans are a certain way, and that’s how it is…we just wanted it to have a clean, modern sound.”
Hanging above the toilet in San Francisco’s Different Fur recording studios — where artists like the Alabama Shakes and Bobby Brown have recorded — is a clipping from Tape Op magazine that reads: “Don’t admit to Auto-Tune use or editing of drums, unless asked directly. Then admit to half as much as you really did.”
Different Fur’s producer / engineer / owner, Patrick Brown, who hung the clipping there, has recorded acts like the Morning Benders, and says many indie rock bands “come in, and first thing they say is, ‘We don’t tune anything,’” he says.
Brown is up for ditching Auto-Tune if the client really wants to, but he says most of the time, they don’t really want to. “Let’s face it, most bands are not genius.” He’ll feel them out by saying, with a wink-wink-nod-nod: “Man, that note’s really out of tune, but that was a great take. Sewer run download. ” And a lot of times they’ll tell him, go ahead, Auto-Tune it.
Marc Griffin is in the RCA-signed band 2AM Club, which has both an emcee and a singer (Griffin’s the singer.) He first got Auto-Tuned in 2008, when he recorded a demo with producer Jerry Harrison, the former keyboardist and guitarist for the Talking Heads.
Thank you for using our software library. https://newmin753.weebly.com/download-turbotax-desktop-for-mac-2017.html. Direct link to the product shall be included for your maximum convenience as soon as it becomes available. To download the product you want for free, you should use the link provided below and proceed to the developer's website, as this is the only legal source to get TurboTax 2017.However, we must warn you that downloading TurboTax 2017 from an external source releases FDM Lib from any responsibility. Please carefully check your downloads with antivirus software.
“I sang the lead, then we were in the control room with the engineer, and he put ‘tune on it. Just a little. And I had perfect pitch vocals. It sounded amazing. Then we started stacking vocals on top of it, and that sounded amazing,” says Griffin.
Now, Griffin sometimes records with Auto-Tune on in real time, rather than having it applied to his vocals in post-production, a trend producers say is not unusual. This means that the artist hears the tuned version of his or her voice coming out of the monitors while singing.
“Every time you sing a note that’s not perfect, you can hear the frequencies battle with each other,” Griffin says, which sounds kind of awful, but he insists it “helps you hear what it will really sound like.”
Singer / songwriter Neko Case kvetched about these developments in an interview with online music magazine, Pitchfork. “I'm not a perfect note hitter either but I'm not going to cover it up with auto tune. Everybody uses it, too. I once asked a studio guy in Toronto, ‘How many people don't use Auto-Tune?’ and he said, ‘You and Nelly Furtado are the only two people who've never used it in here.’ Even though I'm not into Nelly Furtado, it kind of made me respect her. It's cool that she has some integrity.”
That was 2006. This past September, Nelly Furtado released the album, The Spirit Indestructible. Its lead single is doused in massive levels of Auto-Tune. Dmg food safety.
Dr. Evil
Dr. Evil
Somebody once wrote on an online message board that the guy who created Auto-Tune must “hate music.” That could not be further from the truth. Its creator, Dr. Andy Hildebrand, AKA Dr. Andy, is a classically trained flautist who spent most of his youth playing professionally, in orchestras. Despite the fact that the 66-year old only recently lopped off a long, gray ponytail, he’s no hippie. He never listened to rock music of his generation.
“I was too busy practicing,” he says. “It warped me.”
The only post-Debussy artist he’s ever gotten into is Patsy Cline.
Hildebrand’s company — Antares — nestled in an anonymous looking office park in the mountains between Silicon Valley and the Pacific Coast, has only ten employees. Hildebrand invents all the products (Antares recently came out with Auto-Tune for Guitar). His wife is the CFO.
Hildebrand started his career as a geophysicist, programming digital signal processing software which helped oil companies find drilling spots. After going back to school for music composition at age 40, he discovered he could use those same algorithms for the seamless looping of digital music samples, and later for pitch correction. Auto-Tune, and Antares, were born.
Watch Diamond Factory, Anthrax Investigation, Auto-Tune, Luis.. on PBS. See more from NOVA scienceNOW.
Auto-Tune isn’t the only pitch correction software, of course. Its closest competitor, Melodyne, is reputed to be more “natural” sounding. But Auto-Tune is, in the words of one producer, “the go-to if you just want to set-it-and-forget-it.”
Guy Falls Off Stage With Auto Tune
In interviews, Hildebrand handles the question of “is Auto-Tune evil?” with characteristic dry wit. His stock answer is, “My wife wears makeup, does that make her evil?” But on the day I asked him, he answered, “I just make the car. I don’t drive it down the wrong side of the road.”
“I just make the car. I don’t drive it down the wrong side of the road.”
The T-Pains and Chers of the world are the crazy drivers, in Hildebrand’s analogy. The artists that tune with subtlety are like his wife, tasteful people looking to put their best foot forward.
Another way you could answer the question: recorded music is, by definition, artificial. The band is not singing live in your living room. Microphones project sound. Mixing, overdubbing, and multi-tracking allow instruments and voices to be recorded, edited, and manipulated separately. There are multitudes of effects, like compression, which brings down loud sounds and amplifies quiet ones, so you can hear an artist taking a breath in between words. Reverb and delay create echo effects, which can make vocals sound fuller and rounder.
When recording went from tape to digital, there were even more opportunities for effects and manipulation, and Auto-Tune is just one of many of the new tools available. Nonetheless, there are some who feel it’s a different thing. At best, unnecessary. At worst, pernicious.
“The thing is, reverb and delay always existed in the real world, by placing the artist in unique environments, so [those effects are] just mimicking reality,” says Larry Crane, the editor of music recording magazine, Tape Op, and a producer who’s recorded Elliott Smith and The Decemberists. If you sang in a cave, or some other really echo-y chamber, you’d sound like early Elvis, too. “There is nothing in the natural world that Auto-Tune is mimicking, therefore any use of it should be carefully considered.”
“I’d rather just turn the reverb up on the Fender Twin in the troubling place,” says Arizona indie rock pioneer Howe Gelb, of the band Giant Sand. He describes Auto-Tune and other correction plug-ins as “foul” in a way he can’t quite put his finger on. ”There’s something embedded in the track that tends to push my ear away.”
Lee Alexander, one time boyfriend of Norah Jones and bass player and producer for her country side project, The Little Willies, used no Auto-Tune on their two records, and says he doesn’t even own the program.
“Stuff is out of tune everywhere…that to me is the beauty of music,” he wrote in an email.
In 2000, Matt Kadane of the band The New Year, and his brother, Bubba covered Cher’s “Believe”, complete with Auto-Tune. They did it in their former Texas Slo-Core band, Bedhead. Kadane told me hated the original “Believe,” and had to be talked into covering it, but had surprisingly found that putting Auto-Tune on his vocals “added emotional weight.” He hasn’t, however, used Auto-Tune since.
“It’s one thing to make a statement with hollow, disaffected vocals, but it’s another if this is the way we’re communicating with each other,” he says.
For some people, I said, it seems that Auto-Tune is a lot like dudes and fake boobs. Some dudes see fake boobs, they know they’re fake, but they get an erection anyway. They can’t help themselves. Kadane agreed that it “can serve that function.”
“But at some point you’d say ‘that’s fucked up that I have an erection from fake boobs!’” he says. “And in the midst of experiencing that, I think ideally you have a moment that reminds you that authenticity is still possible. And thank God not everything in the world is Auto-Tuned.”
The Beatles actually suck
The Beatles actually suck
Does your brain get rewired to expect perfect pitch?
The concept of pitch needing to be “correct” is a somewhat recent construct. Cue up the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main St., and listen to what Mick Jagger does on “Sweet Virginia.” There are a lot of flat and sharp notes, because, well, that’s characteristic of blues singing, which is at the roots of rock and roll.
“When a (blues) singer is ‘flat’ it’s not because he’s doing it because he doesn’t know any better. It’s for inflection!” says Victor Coelho, Professor of Music at Boston University.
Blues singers have traditionally played with pitch to express feelings like longing or yearning, to punch up a nastier lyric, or make it feel dirty, he says. “The music is not just about hitting the pitch.”
Of course that style of vocal wouldn’t fly in Auto-Tune. It would get corrected. Neil Young, Bob Dylan, many of the classic artists whose voices are less than pitch perfect – they probably would be pitch corrected if they started out today.
John Parish, the UK-based producer who’s worked with PJ Harvey and Sparklehorse, says that though he uses Auto-Tune on rare occasions, he is no fan. Many of the singers he works with, Harvey in particular, have eccentric vocal styles -- he describes them as “character singers.” Using pitch correction software on them would be like trying to get Jackson Pollock to stay inside the lines.
“I can listen to something that can be really quite out of tune, and enjoy it,” says Parish. But is he a dying breed?
“That’s the kind of music that takes five listens to get really into,” says Nikolic, of Poolside. “That’s not really an option if you want to make it in pop music today. You find a really catchy hook and a production that is in no way challenging, and you just gear it up!”
If you’re of the generation raised on technology-enabled perfect pitch, does your brain get rewired to expect it? So-called “supertasters” are people who are genetically more sensitive to bitter flavors than the rest of us, and therefore can’t appreciate delicious bitter things like IPAs and arugula. Is the Auto-Tune generation likewise more sensitive to off key-ness, and thus less able to appreciate it? Some troubling signs point to ‘yes.’
“I was listening to some young people in a studio a few years ago, and they were like, ‘I don’t think The Beatles were so good,’” says producer Eric Drew Feldman. They were discussing the song “Paperback Writer.” “They’re going, ‘They were so sloppy! The harmonies are so flat!”
Just make me sound good
Just make me sound good
Guy Falls With Auto Tune Youtube
John Lennon famously hated his singing voice. He thought it sounded too thin, and was constantly futzing with vocal effects, like the overdriven sound on “I Am the Walrus.” I can relate. I love to sing, and in my head, I hear a soulful, husky, alto. What comes out, however, is a cross between a child in the musical Annie, and Gretchen Wilson: nasal, reedy, about as soulful as a mosquito. I’m in a band and I write all the songs, but I’m not the singer: I wouldn’t subject people to that.
Producer and Editor Larry Crane says he thinks lots of artists are basically insecure about their voices, and use Auto-Tune as a kind of protective shield.
“I’ve had people come in and say I want Auto-Tune, and I say, ‘Let’s spend some time, let’s do five vocal takes and compile the best take. Let’s put down a piano guide track. There’s a million ways to coach a vocal. Let’s try those things first,’” he says.
Recently, I went over to a couple-friend’s house with my husband, to play with Auto-Tune. The husband of the couple, Mike, had the software on his home computer – he dabbles in music production – and the idea was that we’d record a song together, then Auto-Tune it.
Choose something from our extensive image gallery, select images from your computer or social media accounts. Avery design pro mac download. Avery Design & Print software is the easiest and most flexible way to customise all your Avery products in minutes.Avery have created thousands of to get you started. Choose a blank template to create your design from scratch, or personalise one of our designs.Customise your text: Add straight and circular text boxes, change colour and font style, selecting from over 60 different fonts.Insert Images and Graphics: Add logos, pictures and clipart to your Avery products.
We looked for something with four-part harmony, so we could all sing, and for a song where the backing instrumental was available online. We settled on Boyz II Men’s “End of the Road.” One by one we went into the bedroom to record our parts, with a mix of shame and titillation not unlike taking turns with a prostitute.
When we were finished, Mike played back the finished piece, without Auto-Tune. It was nerve wracking to listen to, I felt like my entire body was cringing. Although I hit the notes OK, there was something tentative and childlike about my delivery. Thank God these are my good friends, I thought. Of course they were probably all thinking the same thing about their performances, too, but in my mind, my voice was the most annoying of all, so wheedling and prissy sounding.
Then Mike Auto-Tuned two versions of our Boys II Men song: one with Cher / T-Pain style glitchy Auto-Tune, the other with “natural” sounding Auto-Tune. The exaggerated one was hilariously awesome – it sounded just like a generic R&B song.
But the second one shocked me. It sounded like us, for sure. But an idealized version of us. My husband’s gritty vocal attack was still there, but he was singing on key. And something about fine-tuning my vocals had made them sound more confident, like smoothing out a tremble in one’s speech.
The Auto-Tune or not Auto-Tune debate always seems to turn into a moralistic one, like somehow you have more integrity if you don’t use it, or only use it occasionally. But seeing how really innocuous-yet-lovely it could be, made me rethink. If I were a professional musician, would I reject the opportunity to sound, what I consider to be, “my best,” out of principle?
The answer to that is probably no. But then it gets you wondering. How many insecure artists with “annoying” voices will retune themselves before you ever have a chance to fall in love?
Video stills from: TiK ToK by Ke$ha Animal by Ke$ha Believe by Cher In The Air Tonight by Phil Collins Buy U A Drink by T-Pain Hung Up in Glee Big Hoops by Nelly Furtado Piano Fire by Sparklehorse and P.J. Harvey Imagine by John Lennon
Tumblr media
If i were a professional musician, would I reject the opportunity to sound 'my best,' out of principal?
Tumblr media
0 notes
karingudino · 2 months ago
Text
These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too
This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a nonprofit investigative information group.
On an overcast January day in Estelline, South Dakota, Jonathan Lundgren zips his quilted jacket over a fleece, pulls down a wool cap, and crunches by means of the snow on Blue Dasher Farm to his barn, a milking parlor that he has kitted out as a biochemical laboratory.
Lundgren is an uncommon hybrid: a working farmer interested by reforming that occupation, and a working scientist, a former U.S. Division of Agriculture entomologist who nonetheless does chemical evaluation. Surrounded by the same old lab paraphernalia—a spectrophotometer, a PCR machine, a centrifuge—Lundgren glances out the window on the sheep huddled in his pasture and a big flock of geese, chickens, turkeys, and geese. Then he turns to the deer spleens in entrance of him. For months, he’s been analyzing them for traces of pesticides known as neonicotinoids.
Chemically associated to nicotine, neonics, as they’re identified, had been developed within the Nineties as a safer various to extra poisonous, longer-lasting farm chemical compounds. They’re now essentially the most broadly used pesticides on the planet, efficient in opposition to aphids and leafhoppers and a variety of worms, beetles, and borers. Deployed as coatings on seeds for crops that cowl greater than 150 million acres in the US, neonics are taken up by all plant components: roots, stems, leaves, fruit, pollen, and nectar. Bugs chew or suck on their most well-liked portion, then curl up and die.
Historical past tells us that such broad-spectrum pesticides could have unintended penalties, and scores of research counsel that neonics, together with local weather change and habitat destruction, are contributing to the steady decline of insects throughout North America and Europe. Bees, important for crop pollination, have been particularly exhausting hit.
(Read a National Geographic cover story on insect declines.)
The proof of hurt is robust sufficient that the European Union has banned outdoor use of three popular neonics. And whereas the U.S. hasn’t but taken such decisive motion, it’s changing into more and more clear that bees and different useful bugs aren’t the one animals in danger.
Over the previous a number of years, scientists have discovered that solely about 5 p.c of neonic seed coatings are taken up by crop vegetation. The remainder washes or wears off seeds. The chemical compounds accumulate in soils and waterways, the place a variety of wildlife is uncovered to them. Proof is rising that compounds tailor-made to take out invertebrates may also hurt mammals, birds, and fish.
In his barn this winter, Lundgren has been compiling a few of the latest proof—knowledge suggesting {that a} vital variety of wild deer within the higher Midwest have neonics of their spleens.
A singular experiment
One of many first indicators that neonics can have an effect on giant animals got here from one other examine Lundgren labored on, additionally involving deer—however captive ones this time.
In 2015, a group of scientists at South Dakota State College got down to decide how a neonic known as imidacloprid—which is used on corn, soy, wheat, and cotton—may have an effect on giant herbivores. The scientists ran a first-of-its-kind experiment on a captive herd of white-tailed deer, consisting of 21 grownup females and 63 fawns born to these females throughout the course of the experiment. Graduate pupil Elise Hughes Berheim and wildlife ecologist Jonathan Jenks blended imidacloprid at a variety of doses into the animals’ water.
After they euthanized the herd after two years, the researchers discovered that animals with increased ranges of the pesticide of their spleens had shorter jawbones, decreased physique weight, and undersized organs, together with genitals. Greater than a 3rd of the fawns died prematurely, and people fawns had a lot increased spleen ranges of imidacloprid than the survivors. Each fawns and adults with increased ranges had been much less energetic whereas alive—which within the wild would have made them extra weak to predators.
A white-tail deer feeds by an oak tree close to Ocala, Florida. In North Dakota and Minnesota, deer have been discovered with neonics of their tissues, which they presumably consumed by means of foraging or ingesting water.
{Photograph} by Mark Emery, Nat Geo Picture Assortment
Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited.
A number of the deer had gotten doses of imidacloprid far increased than any but reported in pure streams or wetlands. However the group additionally examined the spleens of untamed deer collected, over an eight-year interval, by North Dakota sport officers. Jenks was stunned to search out they contained imidacloprid at ranges greater than 3 times increased than those who produced abnormalities in his captive herd. He surmised the wild animals had been contaminated by their forage vegetation or water.
Printed in Scientific Reports in March of 2019, the outcomes had been massive information for anybody who managed or hunted sport round farmland, and for anybody involved concerning the impacts of farm chemical compounds on wildlife. In any case, animals with malformed jaws and undersized reproductive organs could have hassle consuming or breeding. “Neonics may have a catastrophic impact on white-tailed deer populations,” says Jennifer Sass, a senior scientist with the Pure Sources Protection Council, an environmental group.
5 producers in Europe, the U.S., and Japan dominate the neonic market. Bayer CropScience, shaped when the German pharmaceutical firm took over Monsanto, is without doubt one of the world’s largest makers of neonicotinoids, and it’s the main producer of imidacloprid. Bayer spokesman Alexander Hennig dismissed the South Dakota white-tailed deer examine as “unreliable.”
“Not one of the results talked about have been reported in deer populations within the wild,” Hennig wrote in an e-mail. “Many veterinary makes use of are permitted which permit the direct software of neonicotinoids to pets and livestock to guard them from fleas and ticks. This may not be doable if we, or regulators, decided there was a threat to vertebrates.”
In accordance with Hennig, one of many causes neonics had been developed as pesticides is exactly as a result of they don’t have an effect on vertebrates in the identical method—they connect to cell-surface receptors which are a lot much less prevalent in vertebrates.
Rising proof
Deer aren’t the one species inadvertently consuming neonics. Charlotte Roy, a biologist with the Minnesota Division of Pure Sources, has discovered that many sorts of animals will gladly devour neonic-treated seeds after they get an opportunity—as they do throughout spring planting.
In a 2019 study, Roy arrange digital camera traps in agricultural fields the place she had intentionally spilled handled seed. Her motion-triggered cameras recorded greater than a dozen chicken species (together with ring-necked pheasants, geese, and turkeys), plus bears, raccoons, rodents, rabbits, foxes, and skunks, all feeding on the handled seed.
Unintentional spills of seeds from mechanized planters occur regularly, in line with Roy. Farmers are instructed by seed firms to scrub them up, however small mounds of grain, containing hundreds of seeds, are widespread. Roy and her colleagues estimate that tens of hundreds of spills happen yearly throughout Minnesota.
Precisely how neonic-coated seeds have an effect on progress, growth, and organ operate of vertebrates stays an open query. However proof of hurt is accumulating.
Ring-necked pheasants and different animals have been noticed consuming neonic-treated seeds that had been spilled in fields.
{Photograph} by Robbie George, Nat Geo Picture Assortment
Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited.
Researchers in Canada have proven that consuming as few as four imidacloprid-treated canola seeds over three days can intrude with a sparrow’s capability emigrate. A graduate pupil at South Dakota State final yr demonstrated that ring-necked pheasants—the number-one sport animal within the Dakotas—turned extra underweight, weak, and torpid the extra handled corn seeds they consumed. (In accordance with the researcher, the birds had been fed fewer handled seeds than they’ve been noticed to eat within the wild.) Greater-dosed birds additionally laid fewer eggs, began their nests every week later, and suffered a 20 p.c decline in chick survival.
Lab research have reported a slew of proof that publicity to neonics is dangerous to vertebrate animals. It reduces sperm manufacturing and will increase abortions and skeletal abnormalities in rats; suppresses the immune response of mice and the sexual operate of Italian male wall lizards; impairs mobility of tadpoles; will increase miscarriage and untimely delivery in rabbits; and reduces survival of red-legged partridges, each adults and chicks.
In Japan, scientists linked the collapse of a lucrative fishery to the widespread adoption of imidacloprid on close by paddies and farm fields.
Final yr, Eric Michel, an ungulate analysis scientist on the Minnesota Division of Pure Sources (and a coauthor of the white-tailed deer paper), put out a name for the spleens of hunter-killed deer. His goal was to be taught extra concerning the presence or absence of neonics in Minnesota animals, to assist set limits on doe-hunting permits. “Something that impacts inhabitants dynamics, we wish to know,” he says.
Practically 800 spleens ultimately had been delivered to Lundgren for chemical evaluation. Preliminary outcomes advised that greater than 50 p.c of the spleens had been optimistic for neonics; Lundgren is at the moment rerunning these samples to double-check his work.
As a companion examine, Lundgren can also be analyzing the spleens of 100 river otters, bobcats, and fishers—high predators that had been trapped, legally, in North Dakota. His preliminary outcomes counsel neonics contaminated between 15 and 30 p.c of the samples. The animals may have consumed the pesticides in contaminated vegetation, prey, or water, he says.
Lundgren’s findings don’t shock him in any respect; he’s satisfied that insecticides are having a big impact on biodiversity globally. “We’ve been seeing the deterioration of organic communities for fairly a while. Clearly we aren’t totally understanding the implications of those pesticides.”
Requested to reply to research that counsel neonics can hurt vertebrates, CropLife America, a commerce affiliation representing the makers and distributors of pesticides, acknowledged: “Primarily based on numerous conclusive research carried out world wide, neonicotinoids are confirmed to be efficient in controlling dangerous bugs in agricultural and non-agricultural settings with no unreasonable opposed results on nontarget organisms when used in line with label directions.”
What about people?
People are uncovered to neonics too, in fact. We unintentionally inhale the stuff or contact handled surfaces on farms, in gardens, and when making use of flea-and-tick remedies to our pets. Through the previous decade, the U.S. Environmental Safety Company has recorded greater than 1,600 instances of human imidacloprid poisoning. Signs ranged from rashes, complications, and wheezing to reminiscence loss and renal failure.
However folks additionally devour neonics of their meals. The pesticides are routinely utilized—usually as leaf sprays or soil remedies—to cauliflower, spinach, apples, grapes, squash, melons, tomatoes, and different produce and grains. Nearly 100% of corn within the U.S. is handled with neonics. A 2015 study by the American Hen Conservancy and Harvard College’s T.H. Chan Faculty of Public Well being discovered neonic residues—albeit at ranges the EPA deems acceptable—in nearly each dish served at cafeterias in U.S. Congressional buildings. A 2019 Nationwide Institutes of Well being study discovered neonics in 49.1 p.c of three,038 human urine samples.
There isn’t a direct proof to date that dietary publicity to neonics causes hurt to people.
The EPA is at the moment reviewing the registrations of 5 neonics, together with imidacloprid. Environmental organizations and human-health specialists declare the company’s ongoing analyses have constantly underestimated the prices of neonic use and overestimated the advantages. These teams have known as for EPA to cancel or severely limit many neonic makes use of and disallow their presence in meals, which successfully would forestall their use on meals crops. (Natural growers don’t use neonics.) After additional examine, EPA may give you new, extra stringent tolerance ranges, which might enable some agricultural use.
Tractors pack down a large mound of corn at a feedlot close to Imperial, Nebraska, earlier than storm clouds roll in. Nearly 100% of corn within the U.S. is handled with neonics.
{Photograph} by Randy Olson, Nat Geo Picture Assortment
Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited.
Clearly, extra analysis on how neonics probably have an effect on vertebrates is required. However discipline research of animals are vanishingly uncommon as a result of they take an excessive amount of time, effort, and cash. Few states help such analysis the way in which Minnesota and South Dakota have. Empirical knowledge is tough to return by. Wild animals that present indicators of poisoning, writes environmental toxicologist Pierre Mineau, a former senior scientist with Surroundings Canada, “run a excessive threat of predation or demise”—that’s, they die and not using a hint. Wildlife rehabilitators and sport wardens usually do encounter malformed animals, however they lack the assets to review them scientifically.
In the meantime, neonic-treated seeds are a $1.5-billion international market that the business has a robust curiosity in defending. After the peer-reviewed white-tailed deer paper was printed, says Lundgren, an nameless (to him) seed-company accused the analysis group of misconduct and falsifying knowledge. An investigation by the college, South Dakota State, discovered the grievance had no advantage.
“I believe they only wished to harass us,” Lundgren says. “It was disruptive to our work, although, and our credibility is essential to us.”
Neonics are excellent at killing crop pests, however research have proven they don’t essentially improve yields of soybeans or corn, and so they could cut back farmers’ earnings by growing their prices. The European Union has banned all outside use of three main neonics, together with imidacloprid, to guard pollinators (though farmers proceed to use for “emergency exemptions” throughout pest outbreaks). Canada is considering a similar ban, and scores of payments to limit or ban neonic use have been launched in U.S. statehouses within the final two years alone.
Federal payments to restrict these compounds have stalled in recent times, and environmental advocates doubt the Biden Administration will prioritize neonic regulation (though it does plan to reexamine the approval of chlorpyrifos, a extremely poisonous, non-neonicotinoid pesticide). The incoming Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, additionally led the USDA throughout the Obama Administration; throughout that point neonic use by farmers elevated.
If the USDA continues to advertise the present system of coating genetically engineered seeds with herbicides, says Willa Childress, an organizer with the Pesticide Action Network North America, “it’ll proceed to drive neonic deplete, except EPA intervenes and says no.”
A extra holistic method
Lundgren, in South Dakota, avoids the weediness of the regulatory panorama to give attention to bigger points. In addition to finding out animal tissue and soil chemistry, his Blue Dasher Farm additionally develops, evaluates, and teaches ecologically based mostly—and economically worthwhile—agricultural practices to farmers and ranchers throughout the nation.
These practices fall below the heading of “regenerative agriculture,” as a result of they’re geared toward restoring degraded soil to a pure, wholesome, uncontaminated state. For Lundgren, neonics are a symptom of an even bigger drawback: industrial agriculture’s common reliance on chemical inputs that contaminate waterways and cut back the well being and biodiversity of the soil.
“Banning neonics isn’t going to resolve the underlying points with our meals manufacturing system,” he says. “Our work on regenerative cropping and livestock methods”—which incorporates tilling much less, planting cowl crops, and selling useful bugs and extra numerous crop rotations—“is exhibiting that pesticides are actually not wanted.”
“Change isn’t coming from the federal government,” Lundgren continues, “however from the grassroots. Regenerative ag is gaining momentum at an astounding price. I look to that as an actual signal of hope.”
//<![CDATA[ window['__natgeo__']={"app":{"uid":"natgeo","mode":"universal","apiEnv":"production","envName":"prod","cdnPath":"//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client","collateXhr":{},"webpack":{},"nochunks":false,"allowMocks":true,"mockDataPort":1981,"inclPgCSS":true,"assets":{"scripts":["//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client/natgeo.js","//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client/natgeo-en-us.js","//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client/article.js"],"stylesheets":["//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client/css/natgeo.css","//assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/a2abdf4a4e00-release-03-03-2021.9/client/css/article.css"]},"device":"desktop","edition":{"key":"natgeo-en-us","config":{},"translations":{}},"flags":{"ftr":true,"hdr":true,"prxy":false},"tms":{"enabled":true,"env":"dev","tag":"https://dcf.espn.com/TWDC-DTCI/prod/Bootstrap.js","tagNS":"Boostrapper","emitEvent":"tms:ready","frameTag":"https://dcf.espn.com/TWDC-DTCI/embed_privacy_prod/Bootstrap.js"},"featureGating":{"ensighten":{"enabled":true,"ns":"Boostrapper","scriptTag":"https://dcf.espn.com/TWDC-DTCI/prod/Bootstrap.js","frameTag":"https://dcf.espn.com/TWDC-DTCI/embed_privacy_prod/Bootstrap.js"},"adConfig":{"enabled":true,"insertedAdLimit":null,"insertedAdSpacing":900,"pzn":{"mode":"ltd","extra":true},"refreshInterval":30},"contentExclusions":{"disable":false},"intrctvSlctrs":{"fullPage":{"key":"fullPage","value":"div:not(#natgeo)"},"markup":[{"key":"class="leaflet-container ","value":"div#map"}],"spredfast":{"key":"spredfast","value":"iframe"}},"intrctvWhtlst":{"facebook":{"src":["//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js","//facebook.com/plugins/","//facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//www.facebook.com/plugins/","//www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id="]},"fullPage":{"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/"]},"game":{"src":["//images.nationalgeographic.com/","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//nationalgeographic.com/","//www.nationalgeographic.com/"]},"iHeartRadio":{"src":["//iheart.com/podcast/","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//www.iheart.com/podcast/"]},"instagram":{"src":["//instagram.com/p/","//instagram.com/embed.js","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js","//www.instagram.com/embed.js"]},"markup":{"href":["//api.tiles.mapbox.com/mapbox-gl-js/","//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=","//fonts.ngeo.com/","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//nationalgeographic.com/","//ngm.nationalgeographic.com/","//s3.amazonaws.com/ng-plastic-prod","//www.nationalgeographic.com/"],"src":["//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/","//api.tiles.mapbox.com/mapbox-gl-js/","//assets.documentcloud.org/viewer/loader.js","//d3js.org/d3","//fonts.ngeo.com/","//images.nationalgeographic.com/","//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//nationalgeographic.com/","//news.nationalgeographic.com/","//ngm.nationalgeographic.com/","//platform.vine.co/static/scripts/embed.js","//s3.amazonaws.com/ng-plastic-prod","//www.nationalgeographic.com/"]},"soundCloud":{"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//soundcloud.com/","//w.soundcloud.com/"]},"source":{"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/"]},"spredfast":{"href":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/"],"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/"]},"twitter":{"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//platform.twitter.com/","//twitter.com/","//www.twitter.com/"]},"vimeo":{"src":["//interactives.natgeofe.com/","//player.vimeo.com/","//vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=","//www.vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id="]}}},"debug":{"on":false},"baseURL":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com"},"ads":{},"analytics":{},"routing":{"location":{"pathname":"/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","port":"","hash":"","path":"/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","host":"","protocol":"","params":"","query":{}},"params":{"section":"environment","slug":"widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","pageType":"article"}},"page":{"key":"","title":"","type":"article","meta":{"canonical":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","description":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","hrefLangs":[{"lcl":"en-us","url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too"}],"ogMetadata":{"type":"article","sclDsc":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","sclTtl":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","sclImg":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137.jpg?w=1200","sclImgHgt":799.8046875,"sclImgWdth":1200,"sctn":"Environment","twtHndl":"@NatGeo","twttrCrd":"summary_large_image","pgTypDta":{"article:published_time":"02-05-2021","article:modified_time":"02-10-2021","article:section":"Environment"}},"title":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","section":"environment","subSection":"","pageName":"natgeo:environment:article","id":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688","ampLink":"https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too"},"content":{"footer":{"frms":[{"id":"natgeo-marketing-inline-email-footer-frame1","mods":[{"id":"natgeo-marketing-inline-email-footer-frame1-module2","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-marketing-inline-email-footer-frame1-module2-tile1","cmsType":"EmailInlineTile","title":"The best of National Geographic delivered to your inbox","backgroundImage":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2e2421a3-f3cb-485f-b482-753cce8baaa0/MossForest.adapt.885.1.jpg","errorMessage":"Please enter a valid e-mail address.","mrktngMeta":{"cpgnCd":"20210217_global_inline_email_signup_footer"},"placeholder":"Enter your email","subtitle":"Sign up for more inspiring photos, stories, and special offers from National Geographic.","success":{"description":"
Watch your inbox over the next few days for photos, stories, and special offers from us.
","header":"Thanks for signing up!"},"submitButton":"Sign Up"}]}],"placement":"footer","chldOptns":{"bannerPlacement":"footer"}},{"placement":"footer","logoObj":{"key":"logoObj","alt":"National Geographic Logo - Home","href":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/","title":null,"logo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":3.4364261168384878}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white.png","ext":"png"}},"mobileLogo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":3.4364261168384878}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white.png","ext":"png"}}},"id":"natgeo-footer","cmsType":"FooterFrame","mods":[{"mnu":[{"title":"Legal","links":[{"url":"https://disneytermsofuse.com/english/","isExternal":null,"title":"Terms of Use"},{"url":"https://privacy.thewaltdisneycompany.com/en/current-privacy-policy/","isExternal":null,"title":"Privacy Policy"},{"url":"https://disneyprivacycenter.com/notice-to-california-residents/","isExternal":null,"title":"Your California Privacy Rights"},{"url":"https://disneyprivacycenter.com/kids-privacy-policy/english/","isExternal":null,"title":"Children's Online Privacy Policy"},{"url":"http://preferences-mgr.trustarc.com/?pid=disney01&aid=natgeo01&type=natgeo","isExternal":null,"title":"Interest-Based Ads"},{"url":"http://www.nielsen.com/digitalprivacy","isExternal":null,"title":"About Nielsen Measurement"},{"url":"https://privacy.thewaltdisneycompany.com/en/dnsmi/","isExternal":null,"title":"Do Not Sell My Info"}]},{"title":"Our Sites","links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/","isExternal":null,"title":"Nat Geo Home"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/events/","isExternal":null,"title":"Attend a Live Event"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/expeditions/?cmpid=int_org=ngp::int_mc=website::int_src=ngp::int_cmp=exp_hp::int_add=ngpexp201904-book-footer","isExternal":null,"title":"Book a Trip"},{"url":"http://www.natgeomaps.com","isExternal":null,"title":"Buy Maps"},{"url":"https://kids.nationalgeographic.com","isExternal":null,"title":"Inspire Your Kids"},{"url":"https://www.shopdisney.com/franchises/national-geographic/","isExternal":null,"title":"Shop Nat Geo"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.org/tickets/events/","isExternal":null,"title":"Visit the D.C. Museum"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/tv/","isExternal":null,"title":"Watch TV"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.org/","isExternal":null,"title":"Learn About Our Impact"},{"url":"https://nationalgeographicpartners.com/","isExternal":null,"title":"Nat Geo Partners"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/masthead/","isExternal":null,"title":"Masthead"},{"url":"https://nationalgeographicpartners.com/press/","isExternal":null,"title":"Press Room"},{"url":"https://disneyadsales.com/our-brands/national-geographic/","isExternal":null,"title":"Advertise With Us"}]},{"title":"Join Us","links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/subscribe","isExternal":false,"title":"Subscribe"},{"url":"https://help.nationalgeographic.com/s/","isExternal":false,"title":"Customer Service"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/renew","isExternal":false,"title":"Renew Subscription"},{"url":"https://ngmservice.com","isExternal":false,"title":"Manage Your Subscription"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographicpartners.com/careers/","isExternal":false,"title":"Work at Nat Geo"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/newsletters/signup?gblftr","isExternal":true,"title":"Sign up for Our Newsletters","target":"_blank"},{"url":"https://give.nationalgeographic.org/page/53299/donate/1?user_id=wb8em7wclp2gec8f8rj9f6lp88q9dftd","isExternal":true,"title":"Contribute to Protect the Planet","target":"_blank"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/pages/article/how-to-write-for-nat-geo","isExternal":true,"title":"Pitch a Story","target":"_blank"}]}]},{"edtnSltr":{"rgns":[{"title":"Europe","countries":[{"title":"Bulgaria","flag":{"icon":"flag__bulgaria","alt":"bu"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/bg","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.bg/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Croatia","flag":{"icon":"flag__croatia","alt":"cr"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/hr","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.adriamedia.hr/izdanja/national-geographic-hrvatska","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Czech Republic","flag":{"icon":"flag__czech-republic","alt":"cz"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/cz","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.national-geographic.cz","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Denmark","flag":{"icon":"flag__denmark","alt":"de"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/dk","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Estonia","flag":{"icon":"flag__estonia","alt":"es"},"links":[{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.ee","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Finland","flag":{"icon":"flag__finland","alt":"fi"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/fi","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"France","flag":{"icon":"flag__france","alt":"fr"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.fr"},{"title":"Georgia","flag":{"icon":"flag__georgia","alt":"ge"},"links":[{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.ge","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Germany","flag":{"icon":"flag__germany","alt":"ge"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.de"},{"title":"Greece","flag":{"icon":"flag__greece","alt":"gr"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/gr","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Hungary","flag":{"icon":"flag__hungary","alt":"hu"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/hu","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.ng.hu","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Israel","flag":{"icon":"flag__israel","alt":"is"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/il","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Italy","flag":{"icon":"flag__italy","alt":"it"},"links":"http://www.nationalgeographic.it"},{"title":"Kazakhstan","flag":{"icon":"flag__kazakhstan","alt":"ka"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.kz","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Lithuania","flag":{"icon":"flag__lithuania","alt":"li"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.lt","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Netherlands","flag":{"icon":"flag__netherlands","alt":"ne"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.nl"},{"title":"Norway","flag":{"icon":"flag__norway","alt":"no"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/no","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Poland","flag":{"icon":"flag__poland","alt":"po"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/pl","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.national-geographic.pl","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Portugal","flag":{"icon":"flag__portugal","alt":"po"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/pt","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://nationalgeographic.sapo.pt","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Romania","flag":{"icon":"flag__romania","alt":"ro"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/ro","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.natgeo.ro/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Russia","flag":{"icon":"flag__russia","alt":"ru"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/ru","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.nat-geo.ru/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Serbia","flag":{"icon":"flag__serbia","alt":"se"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/rs","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.rs/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Slovenia","flag":{"icon":"flag__slovenia","alt":"sl"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/si","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.si/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Spain","flag":{"icon":"flag__spain","alt":"sp"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.es/","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com.es/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Sweden","flag":{"icon":"flag__sweden","alt":"sw"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/se","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Turkey","flag":{"icon":"flag__turkey","alt":"tu"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/tr","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.com.tr/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"United Kingdom","flag":{"icon":"flag__united-kingdom","alt":"uk"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/"}]},{"title":"The Americas","countries":[{"title":"Brazil","flag":{"icon":"flag__brazil","alt":"br"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographicbrasil.com/","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Canada","flag":{"icon":"flag__canada","alt":"ca"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/ca","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Mexico","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"mx"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.ngenespanol.com/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Pan-Regional Latin America (Spanish)","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"pa"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographicla.com/"},{"title":"United States","flag":{"icon":"flag__united-states","alt":"us"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/"}]},{"title":"Asia, Australia & Oceania","countries":[{"title":"Australia","flag":{"icon":"flag__australia","alt":"au"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com.au","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Mainland China","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"ch"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeo.com.cn/","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.ngchina.com.cn/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Hong Kong","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"ho"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/hk","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"India","flag":{"icon":"flag__india","alt":"in"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/in","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.amarchitrakatha.com/in/magazines/national-geographic/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Indonesia","flag":{"icon":"flag__indonesia","alt":"in"},"links":[{"url":"https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Japan","flag":{"icon":"flag__japan","alt":"ja"},"links":[{"url":"http://www.ngcjapan.com/tv/","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.nationalgeographic.jp","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Korea","flag":{"icon":"flag__south-korea","alt":"ko"},"links":[{"url":"http://www.ngckorea.com","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.co.kr/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Pan-Regional Asia (English)","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"pa"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/asia","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Taiwan","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"ta"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.fng.tw/ngc/","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"https://www.natgeomedia.com/","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Thailand","flag":{"icon":"flag__thailand","alt":"th"},"links":[{"url":"http://www.ngthai.com","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]}]},{"title":"Middle East & Africa","countries":[{"title":"Farsi","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"fa"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/farsi","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Persian","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"pe"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/persian","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"South Africa","flag":{"icon":"flag__south-africa","alt":"so"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/za","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Middle East (English)","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"mi"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/ae","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"}]},{"title":"Middle East (Arabic)","flag":{"icon":null,"alt":"mi"},"links":[{"url":"https://www.natgeotv.com/me","isExternal":false,"title":"Channel","target":"_self"},{"url":"http://www.ngalarabiya.com","isExternal":false,"title":"Magazine","target":"_self"}]}]}],"crnt":{"title":"United States","flag":{"icon":"flag__united-states","alt":"us"},"links":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/"},"key":"edtnSltr"},"shrURLs":{"key":"shrURLs","fb":"https://www.facebook.com/natgeo","fbLabel":"natgeo.facebookShare.ariaLabel","fbButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_method":"facebook","content_title":""},"twitter":"https://twitter.com/natgeo/","twitterLabel":"natgeo.twitterShare.ariaLabel","twitterButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_method":"twitter","content_title":""},"instagram":"https://www.instagram.com/natgeo/","instagramLabel":"natgeo.instagramShare.ariaLabel","instagramButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_method":"instagram","content_title":""}}}]},{"placement":"footer","id":"frame10","mods":[{"logoObj":{"key":"logoObj","alt":"National Geographic Logo - Home","href":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/","title":null,"logo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":3.4364261168384878}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white.png","ext":"png"}},"mobileLogo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":3.4364261168384878}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4da26b5c-18ee-413f-96dd-4cf3fb4a68a0/2fl-white.png","ext":"png"}}},"cprt":{"key":"cprt","txt":["Copyright © 1996-2015 National Geographic Society","Copyright © 2015-2021 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved"]}}],"cmsType":"CopyrightFrame"}]},"header":{"frms":[{"id":"natgeo-global-header-frame1","placement":"header","chldOptns":{"bannerPlacement":"header"}},{"placement":"header","id":"natgeo-nav","mods":[{"logoObj":{"key":"logoObj","alt":"National Geographic Logo - Home","href":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/","title":"National Geographic","logo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":3.404255319148936}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e76f5368-6797-4794-b7f6-8d757c79ea5c/ng-logo-2fl","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e76f5368-6797-4794-b7f6-8d757c79ea5c/ng-logo-2fl.png","ext":"png"}},"mobileLogo":{"image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.7}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1852daf6-1c8d-4428-8ee2-d9a82bd0401c/ng-border","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1852daf6-1c8d-4428-8ee2-d9a82bd0401c/ng-border.png","ext":"png"}}},"usr":{"key":"usr","links":[{"url":"#oneid-profile","title":"Account Settings"},{"url":"/subscribe/link-subscription","title":"Link Your Subscription"},{"url":"https://help.nationalgeographic.com/s/","title":"Help","target":"_blank"},{"url":"#oneid-logout","title":"Sign Out"}],"lnk":{"url":"#oneid-login"}},"srch":{"title":null,"icon":null,"href":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/search","key":"srch","shw":true},"rnw":{"key":"rnw","shw":true,"title":"Renew","url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/renew"},"sbcrb":{"key":"sbcrb","shw":true,"title":"Subscribe","url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/subscribe"},"mnu":{"undefined":{"title":"","links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/subscribe","title":"Subscribe"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/renew","title":"Renew"}]},"prmMnu":{"key":"prmMnu","title":"Topics","links":[{"url":"/animals","title":"Animals"},{"url":"/environment","title":"Environment"},{"url":"/history","title":"History & Culture"},{"url":"/science","title":"Science"},{"url":"/travel","title":"Travel"}]},"secMnu":{"key":"secMnu","title":"Sites","links":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/tv/","title":"Watch TV"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine","title":"Read The Magazine"},{"url":"/family","title":"Visit Nat Geo Family"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/expeditions/","title":"Book A Trip"},{"url":"https://kids.nationalgeographic.com","title":"Inspire your Kids"},{"url":"/podcasts/overheard","title":"Listen to Podcasts"},{"url":"https://www.shopdisney.com/franchises/national-geographic/","title":"Shop Nat Geo"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/events/","title":"Attend a Live Event"},{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.org","title":"Support Our Mission"}]},"key":"mnu"},"cmsType":"NavModule"}],"cmsType":"NavFrame"},{"id":"e17aa8d2-d11b-4156-88f1-93b2a532cac9","className":"stickyFrame stickyFrame--bottom","placement":"header","chldOptns":{"bannerPlacement":"footer"}}]},"article":{"frms":[{"id":"natgeo-template1-frame-1","mods":[{"id":"article-immersive-lead-5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"disableImmersiveLead":true,"id":"article-immersive-lead-5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688-t1","focalPoint":{"x":"center","y":"center"},"textPanel":true,"textPosition":{"x":"left","y":"center"},"cmsType":"ImmersiveLeadTile","cmsImage":{"cmsType":"image","hasCopyright":true,"id":"ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4","lines":3,"positionMetaBottom":true,"showMore":true,"caption":"These corn seeds are treated with the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin. Neonics, linked to insect declines, are also being found in larger animals, like deer and birds.","credit":"Photograph by Anand Varma, Nat Geo Image Collection","image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137.jpg","altText":"corn seeds treated with neonicotinoid pesticide","crdt":"Photograph by Anand Varma, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"Corn seeds treated with the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin, of which one purple seed can kill over 100,000 bees.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"neonic-coated-seed"},"imageAlt":"corn seeds treated with neonicotinoid pesticide"},"hideEndBug":true,"positionMetaBottom":true,"ctaLinkDisplay":"textLink","description":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","sectionLabels":[{"name":"Environment","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"},{"name":"News","type":"genres"}],"showArrowDown":true,"theme":"dark","tint":"noTint","title":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too"}]},{"id":"natgeo-template1-frame-1-module-1","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"dvdr":{"hideLogo":true},"cmsType":"ArticleBodyTile","id":"natgeo-template1-frame-1-module-1","bdy":[{"id":"inline-1","cntnt":{"id":"inline-1","cmsType":"editorsNote","note":"This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a nonprofit investigative news organization."},"type":"inline"},{"id":"html0","cntnt":{"mrkup":"On an overcast January day in Estelline, South Dakota, Jonathan Lundgren zips his quilted jacket over a fleece, pulls down a wool cap, and crunches through the snow on Blue Dasher Farm to his barn, a milking parlor that he has kitted out as a biochemical laboratory."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html1","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Lundgren is an unusual hybrid: a working farmer interested in reforming that profession, and a working scientist, a former U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist who still does chemical analysis. Surrounded by the usual lab paraphernalia—a spectrophotometer, a PCR machine, a centrifuge—Lundgren glances out the window at the sheep huddled in his pasture and a large flock of geese, chickens, turkeys, and ducks. Then he turns to the deer spleens in front of him. For months, he’s been analyzing them for traces of insecticides called neonicotinoids."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html2","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Chemically related to nicotine, neonics, as they’re known, were developed in the 1990s as a safer alternative to more toxic, longer-lasting farm chemicals. They’re now the most widely used pesticides in the world, effective against aphids and leafhoppers and a wide range of worms, beetles, and borers. Deployed as coatings on seeds for crops that cover more than 150 million acres in the United States, neonics are taken up by all plant parts: roots, stems, leaves, fruit, pollen, and nectar. Insects chew or suck on their preferred portion, then curl up and die."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html3","cntnt":{"mrkup":"History tells us that such broad-spectrum pesticides may have unintended consequences, and scores of studies suggest that neonics, along with climate change and habitat destruction, are contributing to the steady decline of insects across North America and Europe. Bees, essential for crop pollination, have been especially hard hit."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html4","cntnt":{"mrkup":"(Read a National Geographic cover story on insect declines.)"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html5","cntnt":{"mrkup":"The evidence of harm is strong enough that the European Union has banned outdoor use of three popular neonics. And while the U.S. hasn’t yet taken such decisive action, it’s becoming increasingly clear that bees and other beneficial insects aren’t the only animals at risk."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html6","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Over the past several years, scientists have found that only about 5 percent of neonic seed coatings are taken up by crop plants. The rest washes or wears off seeds. The chemicals accumulate in soils and waterways, where a wide range of wildlife is exposed to them. Evidence is growing that compounds tailored to take out invertebrates can also harm mammals, birds, and fish."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html7","cntnt":{"mrkup":"In his barn this winter, Lundgren has been compiling some of the newest evidence—data suggesting that a significant number of wild deer in the upper Midwest have neonics in their spleens."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html8","cntnt":{"mrkup":"A singular experiment"},"type":"h2"},{"id":"html9","cntnt":{"mrkup":"One of the first signs that neonics can affect large animals came from another study Lundgren worked on, also involving deer—but captive ones this time."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html10","cntnt":{"mrkup":"In 2015, a team of scientists at South Dakota State University set out to determine how a neonic called imidacloprid—which is used on corn, soy, wheat, and cotton—might affect large herbivores. The scientists ran a first-of-its-kind experiment on a captive herd of white-tailed deer, consisting of 21 adult females and 63 fawns born to those females during the course of the experiment. Graduate student Elise Hughes Berheim and wildlife ecologist Jonathan Jenks mixed imidacloprid at a range of doses into the animals’ water."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html11","cntnt":{"mrkup":"When they euthanized the herd after two years, the researchers found that animals with higher levels of the pesticide in their spleens had shorter jawbones, decreased body weight, and undersized organs, including genitals. More than a third of the fawns died prematurely, and those fawns had much higher spleen levels of imidacloprid than the survivors. Both fawns and adults with higher levels had been less active while alive—which in the wild would have made them more vulnerable to predators."},"type":"p"},{"id":"inline-2","cntnt":{"cmsType":"image","hasCopyright":true,"id":"inline-2","lines":3,"positionMetaBottom":true,"showMore":true,"caption":"A white-tail deer feeds by an oak tree near Ocala, Florida. In North Dakota and Minnesota, deer have been found with neonics in their tissues, which they presumably consumed through foraging or drinking water.","credit":"Photograph by Mark Emery, Nat Geo Image Collection","image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.531787584143605},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7de8efa1-1f9b-49cb-832d-dc37b35075e6/white-tail-deer-nationalgeographic_2200606","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7de8efa1-1f9b-49cb-832d-dc37b35075e6/white-tail-deer-nationalgeographic_2200606.jpg","altText":"A whitetail buck deer feeds by an oak tree","crdt":"Photograph by Mark Emery, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"A whitetail buck deer feeds by an oak tree near Ocala, Florida.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"white-tail-deer"},"imageAlt":"A whitetail buck deer feeds by an oak tree","align":"pageWidth","imageSrc":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7de8efa1-1f9b-49cb-832d-dc37b35075e6/white-tail-deer-nationalgeographic_2200606_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358","size":"medium"},"type":"inline"},{"id":"html12","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Some of the deer had gotten doses of imidacloprid far higher than any yet reported in natural streams or wetlands. But the team also examined the spleens of wild deer collected, over an eight-year period, by North Dakota game officials. Jenks was surprised to find they contained imidacloprid at levels more than three times higher than those that produced abnormalities in his captive herd. He surmised the wild animals had been contaminated by their forage plants or water."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html13","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Published in Scientific Reports in March of 2019, the results were big news for anyone who managed or hunted game around farmland, and for anyone concerned about the impacts of farm chemicals on wildlife. After all, animals with malformed jaws and undersized reproductive organs may have trouble eating or breeding. “Neonics could have a catastrophic effect on white-tailed deer populations,” says Jennifer Sass, a senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html14","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Five manufacturers in Europe, the U.S., and Japan dominate the neonic market. Bayer CropScience, formed when the German pharmaceutical company took over Monsanto, is one of the world’s largest makers of neonicotinoids, and it is the primary manufacturer of imidacloprid. Bayer spokesman Alexander Hennig dismissed the South Dakota white-tailed deer study as “unreliable.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html15","cntnt":{"mrkup":"“None of the effects mentioned have been reported in deer populations in the wild,” Hennig wrote in an email. “Many veterinary uses are approved which allow the direct application of neonicotinoids to pets and livestock to protect them from fleas and ticks. This would not be possible if we, or regulators, determined there was a risk to vertebrates.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html16","cntnt":{"mrkup":"According to Hennig, one of the reasons neonics were developed as insecticides is precisely because they don’t affect vertebrates in the same way—they attach to cell-surface receptors that are much less prevalent in vertebrates."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html17","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Growing evidence"},"type":"h2"},{"id":"html18","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Deer aren’t the only species inadvertently consuming neonics. Charlotte Roy, a biologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, has found that many kinds of animals will gladly consume neonic-treated seeds when they get a chance—as they do during spring planting."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html19","cntnt":{"mrkup":"In a 2019 study, Roy set up camera traps in agricultural fields where she had deliberately spilled treated seed. Her motion-triggered cameras recorded more than a dozen bird species (including ring-necked pheasants, geese, and turkeys), plus bears, raccoons, rodents, rabbits, foxes, and skunks, all feeding on the treated seed."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html20","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Accidental spills of seeds from mechanized planters happen frequently, according to Roy. Farmers are instructed by seed companies to clean them up, but small mounds of grain, containing thousands of seeds, are common. Roy and her colleagues estimate that tens of thousands of spills occur annually across Minnesota."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html21","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Exactly how neonic-coated seeds affect growth, development, and organ function of vertebrates remains an open question. But evidence of harm is accumulating."},"type":"p"},{"id":"inline-3","cntnt":{"cmsType":"image","hasCopyright":true,"id":"inline-3","lines":3,"positionMetaBottom":true,"showMore":true,"caption":"Ring-necked pheasants and other animals have been observed eating neonic-treated seeds that were spilled in fields.","credit":"Photograph by Robbie George, Nat Geo Image Collection","image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/215e33e3-747e-43d5-8757-8b345c36fee5/ring-necked-pheasant-nationalgeographic_2319883","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/215e33e3-747e-43d5-8757-8b345c36fee5/ring-necked-pheasant-nationalgeographic_2319883.jpg","altText":"a ring-necked pheasant","crdt":"Photograph by Robbie George, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"Portrait of a ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"ring-necked-pheasant"},"imageAlt":"a ring-necked pheasant","align":"contentWidth","imageSrc":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/215e33e3-747e-43d5-8757-8b345c36fee5/ring-necked-pheasant-nationalgeographic_2319883_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358","size":"small"},"type":"inline"},{"id":"html22","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Researchers in Canada have shown that consuming as few as four imidacloprid-treated canola seeds over three days can interfere with a sparrow’s ability to migrate. A graduate student at South Dakota State last year demonstrated that ring-necked pheasants—the number-one game animal in the Dakotas—became more underweight, weak, and lethargic the more treated corn seeds they consumed. (According to the researcher, the birds were fed fewer treated seeds than they’ve been observed to eat in the wild.) Higher-dosed birds also laid fewer eggs, started their nests a week later, and suffered a 20 percent decline in chick survival."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html23","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Lab studies have reported a slew of evidence that exposure to neonics is harmful to vertebrate animals. It reduces sperm production and increases abortions and skeletal abnormalities in rats; suppresses the immune response of mice and the sexual function of Italian male wall lizards; impairs mobility of tadpoles; increases miscarriage and premature birth in rabbits; and reduces survival of red-legged partridges, both adults and chicks."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html24","cntnt":{"mrkup":"In Japan, scientists linked the collapse of a lucrative fishery to the widespread adoption of imidacloprid on nearby paddies and farm fields."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html25","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Last year, Eric Michel, an ungulate research scientist at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (and a coauthor of the white-tailed deer paper), put out a call for the spleens of hunter-killed deer. His aim was to learn more about the presence or absence of neonics in Minnesota animals, to help set limits on doe-hunting permits. “Anything that affects population dynamics, we want to know,” he says."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html26","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Nearly 800 spleens eventually were delivered to Lundgren for chemical analysis. Preliminary results suggested that more than 50 percent of the spleens were positive for neonics; Lundgren is currently rerunning those samples to double-check his work."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html27","cntnt":{"mrkup":"As a companion study, Lundgren is also analyzing the spleens of 100 river otters, bobcats, and fishers—top predators that had been trapped, legally, in North Dakota. His preliminary results suggest neonics contaminated between 15 and 30 percent of the samples. The animals could have consumed the pesticides in contaminated plants, prey, or water, he says."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html28","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Lundgren’s findings don’t surprise him at all; he’s convinced that pesticides are having a significant effect on biodiversity globally. “We’ve been seeing the deterioration of biological communities for quite some time. Clearly we are not fully understanding the implications of these pesticides.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html29","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Asked to respond to studies that suggest neonics can harm vertebrates, CropLife America, a trade association representing the makers and distributors of pesticides, stated: “Based on various conclusive studies performed around the world, neonicotinoids are proven to be effective in controlling harmful insects in agricultural and non-agricultural settings with no unreasonable adverse effects on nontarget organisms when used according to label instructions.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html30","cntnt":{"mrkup":"What about humans?"},"type":"h2"},{"id":"html31","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Humans are exposed to neonics too, of course. We accidentally inhale the stuff or touch treated surfaces on farms, in gardens, and when applying flea-and-tick treatments to our pets. During the past decade, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recorded more than 1,600 cases of human imidacloprid poisoning. Symptoms ranged from rashes, headaches, and wheezing to memory loss and renal failure."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html32","cntnt":{"mrkup":"But people also consume neonics in their food. The pesticides are routinely applied—often as leaf sprays or soil treatments—to cauliflower, spinach, apples, grapes, squash, melons, tomatoes, and other produce and grains. Almost 100 percent of corn in the U.S. is treated with neonics. A 2015 study by the American Bird Conservancy and Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health found neonic residues—albeit at levels the EPA deems acceptable—in almost every dish served at cafeterias in U.S. Congressional buildings. A 2019 National Institutes of Health study found neonics in 49.1 percent of 3,038 human urine samples."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html33","cntnt":{"mrkup":"There is no direct evidence so far that dietary exposure to neonics causes harm to humans."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html34","cntnt":{"mrkup":"The EPA is currently reviewing the registrations of five neonics, including imidacloprid. Environmental organizations and human-health experts claim the agency’s ongoing analyses have consistently underestimated the costs of neonic use and overestimated the benefits. These groups have called for EPA to cancel or severely restrict many neonic uses and disallow their presence in food, which effectively would prevent their use on food crops. (Organic growers don’t use neonics.) After further study, EPA could come up with new, more stringent tolerance levels, which would allow some agricultural use."},"type":"p"},{"id":"inline-4","cntnt":{"cmsType":"image","hasCopyright":true,"id":"inline-4","lines":3,"positionMetaBottom":true,"showMore":true,"caption":"Tractors pack down a giant mound of corn at a feedlot near Imperial, Nebraska, before storm clouds roll in. Almost 100 percent of corn in the U.S. is treated with neonics.","credit":"Photograph by Randy Olson, Nat Geo Image Collection","image":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5023474178403755},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4f7542e1-7aba-4617-b005-912132f55dad/corn-nationalgeographic_2432803","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4f7542e1-7aba-4617-b005-912132f55dad/corn-nationalgeographic_2432803.jpg","altText":"Tractors pack down a giant mound of corn at a feedlot","crdt":"Photograph by Randy Olson, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"Tractors pack down a giant mound of corn at a feedlot near Imperial, Nebraska, before storm clouds roll in.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"corn-nationalgeographic_2432803"},"imageAlt":"Tractors pack down a giant mound of corn at a feedlot","align":"pageWidth","imageSrc":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4f7542e1-7aba-4617-b005-912132f55dad/corn-nationalgeographic_2432803_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358","size":"medium"},"type":"inline"},{"id":"html35","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Clearly, more research on how neonics potentially affect vertebrates is needed. But field studies of animals are vanishingly rare because they take a great deal of time, effort, and money. Few states support such research the way Minnesota and South Dakota have. Empirical data is hard to come by. Wild animals that show signs of poisoning, writes environmental toxicologist Pierre Mineau, a former senior scientist with Environment Canada, “run a high risk of predation or demise”—that is, they die without a trace. Wildlife rehabilitators and game wardens often do encounter malformed animals, but they lack the resources to study them scientifically."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html36","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Meanwhile, neonic-treated seeds are a $1.5-billion global market that the industry has a strong interest in protecting. After the peer-reviewed white-tailed deer paper was published, says Lundgren, an anonymous (to him) seed-company accused the research team of misconduct and falsifying data. An investigation by the university, South Dakota State, found the complaint had no merit."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html37","cntnt":{"mrkup":"“I think they just wanted to harass us,” Lundgren says. “It was disruptive to our work, though, and our credibility is very important to us.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html38","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Neonics are very good at killing crop pests, but studies have shown they don’t necessarily increase yields of soybeans or corn, and they may reduce farmers’ profits by increasing their costs. The European Union has banned all outdoor use of three major neonics, including imidacloprid, to protect pollinators (although farmers continue to apply for “emergency exemptions” during pest outbreaks). Canada is considering a similar ban, and scores of bills to restrict or ban neonic use have been introduced in U.S. statehouses in the last two years alone."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html39","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Federal bills to limit these compounds have stalled in recent years, and environmental advocates doubt the Biden Administration will prioritize neonic regulation (although it does plan to reexamine the approval of chlorpyrifos, a highly toxic, non-neonicotinoid pesticide). The incoming Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, also led the USDA during the Obama Administration; during that time neonic use by farmers increased."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html40","cntnt":{"mrkup":"If the USDA continues to promote the current system of coating genetically engineered seeds with herbicides, says Willa Childress, an organizer with the Pesticide Action Network North America, “it will continue to drive neonic use up, unless EPA intervenes and says no.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html41","cntnt":{"mrkup":"A more holistic approach"},"type":"h2"},{"id":"html42","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Lundgren, in South Dakota, avoids the weediness of the regulatory landscape to focus on larger issues. Besides studying animal tissue and soil chemistry, his Blue Dasher Farm also develops, evaluates, and teaches ecologically based—and economically profitable—agricultural practices to farmers and ranchers across the nation."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html43","cntnt":{"mrkup":"Those practices fall under the heading of “regenerative agriculture,” because they’re aimed at restoring degraded soil to a natural, healthy, uncontaminated state. For Lundgren, neonics are a symptom of a bigger problem: industrial agriculture’s general reliance on chemical inputs that contaminate waterways and reduce the health and biodiversity of the soil."},"type":"p"},{"id":"html44","cntnt":{"mrkup":"“Banning neonics isn’t going to solve the underlying issues with our food production system,” he says. “Our work on regenerative cropping and livestock systems”—which includes tilling less, planting cover crops, and promoting beneficial insects and more diverse crop rotations—“is showing that insecticides are really not needed.”"},"type":"p"},{"id":"html45","cntnt":{"mrkup":"“Change isn’t coming from the government,” Lundgren continues, “but from the grassroots. Regenerative ag is gaining momentum at an astounding rate. I look to that as a real sign of hope.”"},"type":"p"}],"cid":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688","cntrbGrp":[{"contributors":[{"displayName":"Elizabeth Royte"}],"title":"By","rl":"Writer"}],"mode":"richtext","dt":"2021-02-05T17:53:35.000Z","enableAds":true,"endbug":true,"hsImmrsvLd":true,"isMetered":true,"isUserAuthed":false,"mdDt":"2021-02-10T07:33:47.967Z","pbDt":"2021-02-05T17:53:35.000Z","readTime":"15 min read","schma":{"athrs":[{"name":"Elizabeth Royte"}],"cnnicl":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","kywrds":"pesticides, insects, mammals, food and the environment, food chain","lg":"https://assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/static/default.NG.logo.dark.jpg","pblshr":"National Geographic","abt":"Pesticides","sclDsc":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","sclImg":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137.jpg?w=1200","sclTtl":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too"},"sctn":"Environment","shrURLs":{"fbIcon":"facebook","fb":"https://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fwidely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","fbAriaLabel":"article.facebookShare.ariaLabel","fbLabel":"article.facebookShare.label","fbButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_content_type":"article","content_title":"these widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","share_method":"facebook"},"emailIcon":"email__filled","email":"https://api.addthis.com/oexchange/0.8/forward/email/offer?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fwidely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too&title=These%20widely%20used%20insecticides%20may%20be%20a%20threat%20to%20mammals%20too","emailLabel":"Email","emailButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_content_type":"article","content_title":"these widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","share_method":"email"},"twitter":"https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fwidely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too&text=These%20widely%20used%20insecticides%20may%20be%20a%20threat%20to%20mammals%20too&via=NatGeo","twitterLabel":"Tweet","twitterButtonTracking":{"event_name":"share","share_content_type":"article","content_title":"these widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","share_method":"twitter"}},"wrdcnt":2769,"amplnk":"https://api.nationalgeographic.com/distribution/public/amp/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too"}]}],"cmsType":"ArticleBodyFrame"},{"id":"email-sticky-footer-frame1","mods":[{"id":"email-sticky-footer-frame1-module1","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"id":"email-sticky-footer-frame1-module1-tile1","cmsType":"EmailStickyFooterTile","title":"Enter your email address to continue reading","errorMessage":"Please enter a valid e-mail address.","mrktngMeta":{"cpgnCd":"20210217_global_email wall_general"},"placeholder":"Enter your email address to continue reading","subtitle":"Explore new topics and travel places without leaving your home.","success":{"description":"
Watch your inbox over the next few days for photos, stories, and special offers from us.
","header":"Thanks for signing up!"},"submitButton":"Sign Up"}]}]},null,null,{"id":"natgeo-web-template-readthisnext-frame","mods":[{"id":"natgeo-web-template-readthisnext-module","cmsType":"RecirculationGridModule","itemTruncate":{"description":4,"title":4},"contentList":[{"description":"Using frozen drums, horns, and harps, an emerging art form takes its cues from nature.","img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/78d065c6-2fe7-4b00-b7b1-8f204e75ec0a/IMFN Emile Holba for Maya Valetine Nat Geo Samples On 1","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/78d065c6-2fe7-4b00-b7b1-8f204e75ec0a/IMFN Emile Holba for Maya Valetine Nat Geo Samples On 1.jpg","altText":"man with ice instrument in front of the sun","crdt":"Photograph by Emile Holba","dsc":"Terje Isungset recording ice music on Baffin Island, Canada in -42 degrees.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Making Music with Ice","ratio":"3x2"},"isFeatured":true,"sections":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}],"headline":"Playing it cool: these artists make music with ice","link":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/playing-it-cool-these-artists-make-music-with-ice"},{"description":"Orangutans and bonobos at the San Diego Zoo have received a coronavirus vaccine, Nat Geo has learned, after some zoo gorillas tested positive in January.","img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.499267935578331},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c87c8cda-222e-4869-92ef-f1fa5d1cb0ee/MM9509-animal-vaccines-frank3","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c87c8cda-222e-4869-92ef-f1fa5d1cb0ee/MM9509-animal-vaccines-frank3.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Brent Stirton, Getty Images for National Geographic","dsc":"Frank, a 12-year-old gorilla at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, is pictured after recovering from the coronavirus. After his troop of eight western lowland gorillas got sick in January, zoo staff received experimental COVID-19 vaccines from veterinary pharmaceutical company Zoetis to give to other great apes in their care, including bonobos and orangutans.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"San Diego Zoo gorilla troop"},"sections":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}],"headline":"First great apes at U.S. zoo receive COVID-19 vaccine made for animals","link":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/first-great-apes-at-us-zoo-receive-coronavirus-vaccine-made-for-animals"},{"description":"As the Can Mata landfill expands in Catalonia, paleontologists are uncovering the bones of ancient species that are the precursors to apes—and us.","img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3342019543973942},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8e8729b8-b0ed-4fe2-a421-6f162ae885c4/MM9421_200708_000848","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8e8729b8-b0ed-4fe2-a421-6f162ae885c4/MM9421_200708_000848.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Paolo Verzone, National Geographic","dsc":"Abocador de Can Mata is one of the largest landfills in Spain. Since 2002, a team of paleontologists from the Miquel Crusafont Catalán Institute of Paleontology in Barcelona have found about 70,000 fossils from this period, when the region’s neotropical climate was becoming more arid.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Abocador de Can Mata"},"sections":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"}],"headline":"The priceless primate fossils found in a garbage dump","link":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/priceless-primate-fossils-found-in-a-garbage-dump"},{"description":"Flooding in 2001 near Jiroft, Iran, exposed the ruins of an ancient necropolis from a Bronze Age culture that flourished alongside Mesopotamia.","img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5468277945619335},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a80e659d-9d65-474b-97fb-62f7fd036272/human-cheetas-2","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a80e659d-9d65-474b-97fb-62f7fd036272/human-cheetas-2.jpg","altText":"A stone relief of a man holding two cheetahs by the tail","crdt":"PEJMAN AKBARZADEH/PERSIAN DUTCH NETWORK","dsc":"Scorpions flank a human figure with hoofed feet who has caught two cheetahs by their tails, on a chlorite artifact recovered from Jiroft.","ext":"jpg"},"sections":[{"name":"History Magazine","id":"9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine"}],"headline":"Buried for 4,000 years, this ancient culture could expand the 'Cradle of Civilization'","link":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/jiroft-culture-iran-lost-civilzation"}],"headline":"Read This Next"}],"cmsType":"EnhancedFrame"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-ad-frame1","mods":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-ad","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-ad-tile","cmsType":"AdTile","pos":"infinitefeed"}]}],"cmsType":"EnhancedFrame"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1","fullWidth":true,"mods":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-headline","cmsType":"StackModule","align":"left","edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-headline-tile","cmsType":"HeadlineTile","heading":"Go Further"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals","cmsType":"CarouselModule","centerHeading":true,"edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A new study has found that three species of deep-sea shark, including the six-foot-long kitefin shark, are bioluminescent.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/deep-sea-shark-largest-glowing-animal-bioluminescence","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":2.494518879415347},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d09a4114-da77-43df-8feb-47ad5454702a/El lum vent 5088","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d09a4114-da77-43df-8feb-47ad5454702a/El lum vent 5088.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Jérôme Mallefet","dsc":"Bioluminescence of the Largest Luminous Vertebrate, the Kitefin Shark, Dalatias licha: First Insights and Comparative Aspects that appeared in Frontiers in Marine science.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"glowing-shark-01"},"abstract":"A new study has found that three species of deep-sea shark, including the six-foot-long kitefin shark, are bioluminescent.","title":"This deep-sea shark is one of the world’s largest glowing animals","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A new study using citizen science data revealed a 1.6 percent drop per year since 1972, a worrisome development for the crucial pollinators.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/butterflies-declining-due-to-warmer-autumns-in-western-united-states","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.486211901306241},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1c02f440-ce7a-4f28-bdee-6d8a6567b753/MNRTE1","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1c02f440-ce7a-4f28-bdee-6d8a6567b753/MNRTE1.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Daniel Larson, Alamy","dsc":"Icaricia icarioides","ext":"jpg","ttl":"450-butterfly-species-decline-02"},"abstract":"A new study using citizen science data revealed a 1.6 percent drop per year since 1972, a worrisome development for the crucial pollinators.","title":"450 butterfly species rapidly declining due to warmer autumns in the western U.S.","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The fast-growing tree, native to China, is also a "motel" for harmful non-native insects, like the spotted lanternfly.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/environment/article/tree-of-heaven-invasive-species-could-fungus-save-the-day","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.68896484375},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/76cb581e-961d-48bc-8a16-8c1c1fc962c2/HMPM6B","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/76cb581e-961d-48bc-8a16-8c1c1fc962c2/HMPM6B.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Universal Images Group North America LLC / DeAgostini, Alamy","dsc":"Tree of Heaven or Ailanthus in bloom (Ailanthus altissima), Simaroubaceae. - Image ID: HMPM6B (RM)","ext":"jpg","ttl":"tree-of-heaven-01"},"abstract":"The fast-growing tree, native to China, is also a "motel" for harmful non-native insects, like the spotted lanternfly.","title":"Tree of heaven is a hellish invasive species. Could a fungus save the day?","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Orangutans and bonobos at the San Diego Zoo have received a coronavirus vaccine, Nat Geo has learned, after some zoo gorillas tested positive in January.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/first-great-apes-at-us-zoo-receive-coronavirus-vaccine-made-for-animals","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.499267935578331},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c87c8cda-222e-4869-92ef-f1fa5d1cb0ee/MM9509-animal-vaccines-frank3","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c87c8cda-222e-4869-92ef-f1fa5d1cb0ee/MM9509-animal-vaccines-frank3.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Brent Stirton, Getty Images for National Geographic","dsc":"Frank, a 12-year-old gorilla at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, is pictured after recovering from the coronavirus. After his troop of eight western lowland gorillas got sick in January, zoo staff received experimental COVID-19 vaccines from veterinary pharmaceutical company Zoetis to give to other great apes in their care, including bonobos and orangutans.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"San Diego Zoo gorilla troop"},"abstract":"Orangutans and bonobos at the San Diego Zoo have received a coronavirus vaccine, Nat Geo has learned, after some zoo gorillas tested positive in January.","title":"First great apes at U.S. zoo receive COVID-19 vaccine made for animals","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Often mailed dozens to a box, animals in the pet trade are subjected to inhumane conditions, experts say.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/exotic-pets-suffer-wildlife-trade","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4981711777615216},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7730d568-cc25-4ae5-8ca8-f8514c037fb5/GettyImages-1032117208","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7730d568-cc25-4ae5-8ca8-f8514c037fb5/GettyImages-1032117208.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by MediaNews Group/Orange County Register, Getty Images","dsc":"COSTA MESA, CA - APRIL 28: Snakes and lizards at Repticon - part of America's Family Pet Expo at the OC Fair Grounds in Costa Mesa, California, on Friday, April 28, 2017. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images)","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Often mailed dozens to a box, animals in the pet trade are subjected to inhumane conditions, experts say.","title":"Many exotic pets suffer or die in transit, and beyond—and the U.S. government is failing to act","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"},{"name":"Wildlife Watch","id":"8de8cc4e-e0d1-3b72-8c7a-dac037e03cb4","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/pages/topic/wildlife-watch"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"From parrots to dogs to chickens, domestic animals are alleviating some of the stress and boredom of quarantine life.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/stuck-at-home-nat-geo-photographers-turn-their-lenses-on-pets","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.6653333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c35bf26e-4f1e-4a1e-b298-770bbd7c6c5a/Pandemic-Pets-–-Zurich-Kiyomi-Kitkat_20210207_00390","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c35bf26e-4f1e-4a1e-b298-770bbd7c6c5a/Pandemic-Pets-–-Zurich-Kiyomi-Kitkat_20210207_00390.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Joshua Irwandi","dsc":"Dionisius Suharmin and Vimaladewi Lukito, and their children, Amadeo Irwan, 13, and Andrea Irwan, 11, share their home with seven cats in North Jakarta, Indonesia. They are family friends of photographer Joshua Irwandi. “They help us to keep our sanity,” Lukito, pictured above on February 7, tells Irwandi. “Taking care of them and giving them love somehow makes us relax a bit in this stressful situation.”","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"From parrots to dogs to chickens, domestic animals are alleviating some of the stress and boredom of quarantine life.","title":"A year into the pandemic, Nat Geo photographers turn their lenses on pets","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Wisdom the albatross, who has survived tsunamis, outlived most of her mates, and raised over 40 chicks, is pushing the boundaries of what we thought birds could do.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/worlds-oldest-bird-just-turned-70-why-so-special","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/74adef40-8c25-4103-830b-fb0b88dfaa36/50672264953_f634fc4229_o","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/74adef40-8c25-4103-830b-fb0b88dfaa36/50672264953_f634fc4229_o.jpg","altText":"Wisdom, Laysan albatross","crdt":"Photograph by Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll NWR / USFWS","dsc":"Wisdom, a mōlī (Laysan albatross) and world’s oldest known, banded wild bird has returned to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial. At least 69 years old, the first observation of Wisdom at her nest sit took place on November 29. Biologists have confirmed that she has laid an egg. Wisdom and her mate are taking turns incubating the egg. Each year millions of albatrosses return to Midway Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to nest and raise their young. Culturally, albatross species are kinolau (body form) of the Hawaiian deity Lono. The birds’ return to land for mating coincides with the beginning of the makahiki season, occurring between October and November, and an important aspect to some practitioners’ ceremonies and practices during that time. Wisdom and her mate, Akeakamai, like most pairs of albatrosses, return nearly every year to the same nest site. This behavior is known as “nest site fidelity” and it makes places with large colonies of nesting birds, like Midway Atoll, critically important for the future survival of seabirds like Wisdom.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Wisdom the albatross, who has survived tsunamis, outlived most of her mates, and raised over 40 chicks, is pushing the boundaries of what we thought birds could do.","title":"The world’s oldest known wild bird just turned 70—why she’s so special","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Spread of the coronavirus has exposed troubling problems at fur farms and how we respond to outbreaks there.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/what-the-mink-coronavirus-pandemic-has-taught-us","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5d9f5ed7-ae97-44bb-8a78-0803e57ab0db/GettyImages-1229492283","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5d9f5ed7-ae97-44bb-8a78-0803e57ab0db/GettyImages-1229492283.jpg","altText":"Picture of a person surrounded by racks of dead minks","crdt":"Photograph by Mads Claus Rasmusse, Ritzau Scanpix, AFP, Getty Images","dsc":"Denmark killed all its mink stock, millions of mink, after a variant form of the novel coronavirus was detected circulating between mink and humans. New research has shown that many farmed mink may be asymptomatic carriers of SARS-CoV-2.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Spread of the coronavirus has exposed troubling problems at fur farms and how we respond to outbreaks there.","title":"What the mink COVID-19 outbreaks taught us about pandemics","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"},{"name":"Wildlife Watch","id":"8de8cc4e-e0d1-3b72-8c7a-dac037e03cb4","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/pages/topic/wildlife-watch"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The king penguin was spotted on the island of South Georgia, where the species gathers in the tens of thousands.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/extremely-rare-yellow-penguin-spotted-near-antarctica","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e4b78c84-c62c-4e0a-a57e-bef312631ddf/naturepl_01503430","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e4b78c84-c62c-4e0a-a57e-bef312631ddf/naturepl_01503430.jpg","altText":"Many penguins in a herd on in a snowy setting","crdt":"Photograph by Klein & Hubert, Nature Picture Library","dsc":"Group of King penguinss (Aptenodytes patagonicus) in blizzard, South Georgia, Antarctica.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"yellow-penguin"},"abstract":"The king penguin was spotted on the island of South Georgia, where the species gathers in the tens of thousands.","title":"Yellow penguin spotted in Antarctica—here's why it's so rare","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"This disease, found in a pet ring-tailed lemur, has never been reported in lemurs in the wild.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/this-pet-lemur-died-from-tuberculosis","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5025678650036685},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/f72cdf5d-67c3-4e75-be9e-574174b3de7c/Mangily_Feb_13a-389","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/f72cdf5d-67c3-4e75-be9e-574174b3de7c/Mangily_Feb_13a-389.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Louise Jasper","dsc":"It’s been illegal to keep lemurs as pets in Madagascar since 1962. But ring-tailed lemurs, such as this one at a rehabilitation center in southern Madagascar, continue to be trapped for the pet trade.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Lemur rehabilitation center Madagascar"},"abstract":"This disease, found in a pet ring-tailed lemur, has never been reported in lemurs in the wild.","title":"A lemur died from tuberculosis—a likely victim of the illegal pet trade","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"},{"name":"Wildlife Watch","id":"8de8cc4e-e0d1-3b72-8c7a-dac037e03cb4","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/pages/topic/wildlife-watch"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Paralyzed by frigid water around South Padre Island, sea turtles washed up on beaches by the hundreds, where volunteers rallied to save them—all without power or heat.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/nearly-5000-sea-turtles-rescued-from-freezing-waters-on-texas-island","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2e718ade-fe78-4964-b824-06d31a8c6dc9/IMG_6933","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2e718ade-fe78-4964-b824-06d31a8c6dc9/IMG_6933.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Sandesh Kadur","dsc":"tk","ext":"jpg","ttl":"sea-turtles-texas-01"},"abstract":"Paralyzed by frigid water around South Padre Island, sea turtles washed up on beaches by the hundreds, where volunteers rallied to save them—all without power or heat.","title":"Nearly 5,000 sea turtles rescued from freezing waters on Texas island","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The majority of gorilla selfies that researchers found on Instagram violated social distancing rules meant to keep the endangered great apes safe.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/tourists-risk-giving-gorillas-coronavirus-other-diseases","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3a395a92-27cb-4abd-9523-11a878c30b10/M494HD","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3a395a92-27cb-4abd-9523-11a878c30b10/M494HD.jpg","altText":"a silverback gorilla walking toward a group of cameras","crdt":"Photograph by Christophe Courteau, Nature Picture Library, Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"Mountain gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei) dominant silverback Akarevuro completely drunk due to the consumption of new bamboo stems which ferment in the stomach, with lots of photographers pointing cameras at him, Kwitonda Group, Volcanoes National Park. Rwanda.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"gorilla-covid-transmission"},"abstract":"The majority of gorilla selfies that researchers found on Instagram violated social distancing rules meant to keep the endangered great apes safe.","title":"Selfie-taking tourists risk giving wild gorillas COVID-19, other diseases","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]}],"heading":"Animals","pageInfo":{"endCursor":"MTE6UkZsT1FWOHdJMGxFT2tSU1RueGtjbTQ2YzNKak9tNWhkR2RsYnpwMWJtbHpiMjQ2T25CeWIyUTZOemxrWXpJMk5Ua3RZV1poTlMwMFlXUmxMV0UwWTJZdE5EVXhORE0zWlRsak9ESmlJMU5QVWxRNmIzSnBaMmx1WVd4UWRXSnNhWE5vWldSRVlYUmxmREUyTVRNM05UVTNNRGsyTlRNPQ","hasNextPage":true},"templateContext":"eyJjb250ZW50VHlwZSI6IlVuaXNvbkFydGljbGVDb250ZW50IiwidmFyaWFibGVzIjp7ImluY2x1ZGVNZWRpYUNvbnRlbnRzIjoidHJ1ZSIsImxvY2F0b3IiOiIvZW52aXJvbm1lbnQvYXJ0aWNsZS93aWRlbHktdXNlZC1pbnNlY3RpY2lkZXMtbWF5LWJlLWEtdGhyZWF0LXRvLW1hbW1hbHMtdG9vIiwicG9ydGZvbGlvIjoibmF0Z2VvIiwicXVlcnlUeXBlIjoiTE9DQVRPUiJ9LCJtb2R1bGVJZCI6bnVsbH0"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-environment","cmsType":"CarouselModule","centerHeading":true,"edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A new satellite finds a surprise: Atmospheric rivers of moisture can dump huge amounts of snow over Antarctica, and now we can track it incredibly closely.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/new-way-to-measure-antarctic-snowfall-helps-predict-ice-sheets-survival","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5024038461538463},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e5d914e4-3291-457b-b1d5-b359771bcd2e/GettyImages-1211998547","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e5d914e4-3291-457b-b1d5-b359771bcd2e/GettyImages-1211998547.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Wolfgang Kaehler, LightRocket/Getty Images","dsc":"View of Livingston Island with clouds from Yankee Harbor in the South Shetland Islands off the coast of Antarctica.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"A new satellite finds a surprise: Atmospheric rivers of moisture can dump huge amounts of snow over Antarctica, and now we can track it incredibly closely.","title":"New way to measure Antarctic snowfall helps predict the ice sheet’s survival","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The U.S. must more than double the production of seedlings to meet reforestation goals, researchers say.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/planting-trees-helps-fight-climate-change-but-we-need-billions-more-seedlings","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/41e52c4d-c701-47be-8559-624cc386266b/GettyImages-1175617123","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/41e52c4d-c701-47be-8559-624cc386266b/GettyImages-1175617123.jpg","altText":"holding a small pine tree seedling in a gloved hand","crdt":"Photograph by Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images","dsc":"A member of a U.S. Park Service revegetation crew holds a whitebark pine seedling with mycorrhizae fungi on its roots on Mount Brown September 17, 2019 in Glacier National Park, Montana. The crew planted 585 two-year-old whitebark pine seedlings among the skeletal remains of the 2017 Sprague Creek Fire because the tree grows more successfully in ground that was recently burned. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising almost three degrees Fahrenheit since 1950, high elevation tree species like the whitebark pine that were not previously threatened are now facing an increase in blister rust infections, mountain pine beetle infestations and wildfire. A slow-growing species that lives at elevations above 6,000 feet, the whitebark is an essential source of food for many birds and small mammals.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"The U.S. must more than double the production of seedlings to meet reforestation goals, researchers say.","title":"Planting trees helps fight climate change—but we need billions more seedlings","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"We rely on fresh water for drinking, food, and sanitation, and they’re in trouble. But freshwater issues are becoming a higher priority for conservationists.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/rivers-and-lakes-are-most-degraded-ecosystems-in-world-can-we-save-them","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dbfd1ad1-b8e7-447c-b9a2-c740df7b4884/NationalGeographic_2322305","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dbfd1ad1-b8e7-447c-b9a2-c740df7b4884/NationalGeographic_2322305.jpg","altText":"a person kayaking on the Colorado river","crdt":"Photograph by Ben Horton, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"A person kayaking on the Colorado River, Utah.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"We rely on fresh water for drinking, food, and sanitation, and they’re in trouble. But freshwater issues are becoming a higher priority for conservationists.","title":"Rivers and lakes are the most degraded ecosystems in the world. Can we save them?","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"},{"name":"News","id":"c3971eb2-c2f7-3fc3-9e33-9cd4ce2ff8d4","type":"series"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Even small systems like those that kept the lights on for some Texas homeowners could play a role in protecting the bigger electricity system, experts say.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/solar-panels-and-batteries-on-your-home-could-help-prevent-the-next-grid-disaster","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4222222222222223},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/30cbee68-cfb4-4fde-b577-cc370e234eb4/GettyImages-181833828","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/30cbee68-cfb4-4fde-b577-cc370e234eb4/GettyImages-181833828.jpg","altText":"a man climbing a ladder to his roof to service solar energy panels","crdt":"Photograph by Ron T. Ennis, Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Getty Images","dsc":"Mike Renner climbs onto the roof of his home in Weatherford, Texas, on September 3, 2013, to service solar hot water and solar energy panels.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Even small systems like those that kept the lights on for some Texas homeowners could play a role in protecting the bigger electricity system, experts say.","title":"Solar panels and batteries on your home could help prevent the next grid disaster","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Decades of research show that Black and brown communities are on the front lines of environmental harms. Can those longstanding injustices be remedied?","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/environmental-justice-origins-why-finally-getting-the-attention-it-deserves","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5125553914327918},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e8c584c-73a3-411d-bed9-50e2b339c5f1/AP_8209161283","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e8c584c-73a3-411d-bed9-50e2b339c5f1/AP_8209161283.jpg","altText":"Reverend Ben Chavis with protesters with signs outside PCB landfill site.","crdt":"Photograph by Greg Gibson, AP","dsc":"Rev. Ben Chavis, right, raises his fist as fellow protesters are taken to jail at the Warren County PCB landfill near Afton, North Carolina on Thursday, Sept. 16, 1982. Chavis is one of the members of the Wilmington 10.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Decades of research show that Black and brown communities are on the front lines of environmental harms. Can those longstanding injustices be remedied?","title":"The origins of environmental justice—and why it’s finally getting the attention it deserves","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Cuba harbors a fraction of the invasive plant species ravaging other Caribbean islands. Experts think its isolationism has helped.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/the-unintended-environmental-benefit-of-cubas-isolation","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9e580489-7923-4081-a2d2-2f79a0b32190/01_NationalGeographic_2726033","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9e580489-7923-4081-a2d2-2f79a0b32190/01_NationalGeographic_2726033.jpg","altText":"Vegetation in cuba","crdt":"Peter R. Houlihan, National Geographic Image Collection","dsc":"Soroa, Artemisa, Cuba - A waterfall descends into a forest of critically endangered royal palms, Roystonea regia.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Cuba harbors a fraction of the invasive plant species ravaging other Caribbean islands. Experts think its isolationism has helped.","title":"The unintended environmental benefit of Cuba's isolation","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Long-lasting heat waves can be deadly. A new study suggests a warming Arctic could drive more of them in the future.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/same-mechanism-behind-southern-cold-spell-could-drive-prolonged-heat-waves","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a0154f4-17e6-4005-877e-7681c2c32140/GettyImages-1231228913","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a0154f4-17e6-4005-877e-7681c2c32140/GettyImages-1231228913.jpg","altText":"a man walking on a snowy street in Waco, Texas","crdt":"Photograph by Matthew Busch, AFP/Getty","dsc":"Charles Andrews, 57, walks home through his neighborhood in Waco, Texas as severe winter weather conditions over the last few days has forced road closures and power outages over the state on February 17, 2021. - Millions of people were still without power on February 17 in Texas, the oil and gas capital of the United States, and facing water shortages as an unusual winter storm pummeled the southeastern part of country. The National Weather Service (NWS) issued a winter storm warning for a swathe of the country ranging from east Texas to the East Coast state of Maryland.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Long-lasting heat waves can be deadly. A new study suggests a warming Arctic could drive more of them in the future.","title":"Same force behind Texas deep freeze could drive prolonged heat waves","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The Keystone XL may never move any oil, but its impact will still linger in the form of the pipes, worker camps, and other assets stranded along its 1,200-mile path.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/keystone-xl-pipeline-dead-now-what","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.0153693604362914},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/889fa8f6-2158-4f41-9076-f7a1cfbf49f5/keystone-infrastructure-hylton08","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/889fa8f6-2158-4f41-9076-f7a1cfbf49f5/keystone-infrastructure-hylton08.jpg","altText":"Pipe that will be used to construct the Keystone XL pipeline is stored in a field","crdt":"Photograph by Sara Hylton","dsc":"Pipe that will be used to construct the Keystone XL pipeline is stored in a field near the border of Montana and North Dakota. While the actual laying of the pipe has been halted because TC Energy and its employees do not have the proper permits, pre-construction activities have continued.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"keystone-infrastructure-hylton08"},"abstract":"The Keystone XL may never move any oil, but its impact will still linger in the form of the pipes, worker camps, and other assets stranded along its 1,200-mile path.","title":"The Keystone XL pipeline is dead. Now what?","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The small herb, once easily spotted by its vibrant flower and leaves, is growing brown and gray in spots where humans often pluck them.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/this-in-demand-plant-is-evolving-to-hide-from-human-predators","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1df4ee5e-c517-4ed5-852b-247c9033b267/plant-camouflage-niuyang-dsc07007","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1df4ee5e-c517-4ed5-852b-247c9033b267/plant-camouflage-niuyang-dsc07007.jpg","altText":"Fritillaria delavayi flower growing in China’s Hengduan Mountains","crdt":"Photograph by Yang Niu","dsc":"Fritillaria delavayi flower growing in China’s Hengduan Mountains","ext":"jpg","ttl":"plant-camouflage-niuyang-dsc07007"},"abstract":"The small herb, once easily spotted by its vibrant flower and leaves, is growing brown and gray in spots where humans often pluck them.","title":"This in-demand plant is evolving to hide from its predator—humans","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137.jpg","altText":"corn seeds treated with neonicotinoid pesticide","crdt":"Photograph by Anand Varma, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"Corn seeds treated with the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin, of which one purple seed can kill over 100,000 bees.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"neonic-coated-seed"},"abstract":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","title":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A National Geographic investigation has found that Permian Basin energy exploration could taint residential aquifers with pollutants—as well as Carlsbad Caverns and other cave systems.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/oil-drilling-sensitive-new-mexico-public-lands-puts-drinking-water-rare-caves-at-risk","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4981711777615216},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0b9131f-a087-4daa-8b5e-4d4493d61b4e/carlsbad-drilling-nationalgeographic_2686116","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0b9131f-a087-4daa-8b5e-4d4493d61b4e/carlsbad-drilling-nationalgeographic_2686116.jpg","altText":"The Chihuahuan Desert in the Guadalupe Mountains of southern New Mexico","crdt":"Photograph by Robbie Shone, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"The Chihuahuan Desert in the Guadalupe Mountains of southern New Mexico.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"carlsbad-drilling-chihuahuan-desert"},"abstract":"A National Geographic investigation has found that Permian Basin energy exploration could taint residential aquifers with pollutants—as well as Carlsbad Caverns and other cave systems.","title":"Oil drilling on sensitive New Mexico public lands puts drinking water, rare caves at risk","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"It’s been 50 years since an international treaty to protect wetlands was created but, around the world, wetlands are still disappearing three times faster than forests.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/world-wetlands-are-slipping-away-agusan-marsh-underscores-stakes","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5025678650036685},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/eefe8b23-0fbe-43eb-a9fb-ebf10c87f179/wetlands-day-9","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/eefe8b23-0fbe-43eb-a9fb-ebf10c87f179/wetlands-day-9.jpg","altText":"woman on a canoe in a body of water moving away from the camera and towards fog","crdt":"Photograph by Gab Mejia","dsc":"Fog and smoke from wetland fires pollutes the air of the Manobo indigenous community and the wildlife thriving in the Agusan Marshlands.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"wetlands-day-9"},"abstract":"It’s been 50 years since an international treaty to protect wetlands was created but, around the world, wetlands are still disappearing three times faster than forests.","title":"The world’s wetlands are slipping away. This vibrant sanctuary underscores the stakes.","tags":[{"name":"Environment","id":"623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment"}]}],"heading":"Environment","pageInfo":{"endCursor":"MTE6UkZsT1FWOHdJMGxFT2tSU1RueGtjbTQ2YzNKak9tNWhkR2RsYnpwMWJtbHpiMjQ2T25CeWIyUTZPRGRtTTJVM05qZ3RNalJoTVMwMFlXWmpMV0ZtWWpJdE1HUTVPRFUxTlRSbE1qRmtJMU5QVWxRNmIzSnBaMmx1WVd4UWRXSnNhWE5vWldSRVlYUmxmREUyTVRJeU9URXlNREF3TURBPQ","hasNextPage":true},"templateContext":"eyJjb250ZW50VHlwZSI6IlVuaXNvbkFydGljbGVDb250ZW50IiwidmFyaWFibGVzIjp7ImluY2x1ZGVNZWRpYUNvbnRlbnRzIjoidHJ1ZSIsImxvY2F0b3IiOiIvZW52aXJvbm1lbnQvYXJ0aWNsZS93aWRlbHktdXNlZC1pbnNlY3RpY2lkZXMtbWF5LWJlLWEtdGhyZWF0LXRvLW1hbW1hbHMtdG9vIiwicG9ydGZvbGlvIjoibmF0Z2VvIiwicXVlcnlUeXBlIjoiTE9DQVRPUiJ9LCJtb2R1bGVJZCI6bnVsbH0"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history","cmsType":"CarouselModule","centerHeading":true,"edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"After fighting a revolution against Mexico, the Republic of Texas was briefly a sovereign nation. Self-rule wouldn’t last long—but its legacy has endured.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/origin-texas-proud-independent-streak","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3644237175216523},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e8df9e8-923d-41fe-bc85-4e21cd482e49/battle-alamo-151457247","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e8df9e8-923d-41fe-bc85-4e21cd482e49/battle-alamo-151457247.jpg","altText":"Drawing of people with guns fighting in front of the alamo","crdt":"Photograph by Interim Archives, Getty","dsc":"Illustration showing Mexican Army troops attacking and scaling the walls of the Alamo, San Antonio, Texas, March 6, 1836. Published in Shinn's History of the American People, 1899.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"After fighting a revolution against Mexico, the Republic of Texas was briefly a sovereign nation. Self-rule wouldn’t last long—but its legacy has endured.","title":"The origins of Texas’s proud independent streak","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Trailblazer Nellie Bly first went undercover in a New York psychiatric hospital in 1887, when she exposed its horrific conditions.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/nellie-bly-united-states-first-investigative-journalist-started-asylum","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.64794921875},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/360ea3a1-6b75-4eca-bef5-2bfe43a2f413/nellie-bly-portrait","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/360ea3a1-6b75-4eca-bef5-2bfe43a2f413/nellie-bly-portrait.jpg","altText":"A sepia toned portrait of a woman","crdt":"BRIDGEMAN/ACI","dsc":"Nellie Bly, 1890 photograph","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Trailblazer Nellie Bly first went undercover in a New York psychiatric hospital in 1887, when she exposed its horrific conditions.","title":"America's first investigative journalist got her start in an asylum","tags":[{"name":"History Magazine","id":"9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A British royal governor, not Abraham Lincoln, was the first person to offer enslaved Americans freedom—in return for battling revolutionaries.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/forgotten-first-emancipation-proclamation","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4457831325301205},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/edd1c33f-b6c9-4e4d-a8ff-d53ce0075c40/Granger_0097558_HighRes","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/edd1c33f-b6c9-4e4d-a8ff-d53ce0075c40/Granger_0097558_HighRes.jpg","altText":"Colored engraving of enslaved people being led o a ship by British soldiers","crdt":"Granger","dsc":"SLAVERY: WEST INDIES, 1780. Captured slaves formerly belonging to South Carolina planters being sent to the West Indies for sale after the fall of Charleston to the British in 1780. Wood engraving, 19th century.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"A British royal governor, not Abraham Lincoln, was the first person to offer enslaved Americans freedom—in return for battling revolutionaries.","title":"The forgotten first emancipation proclamation","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Flooding in 2001 near Jiroft, Iran, exposed the ruins of an ancient necropolis from a Bronze Age culture that flourished alongside Mesopotamia.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/jiroft-culture-iran-lost-civilzation","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5468277945619335},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a80e659d-9d65-474b-97fb-62f7fd036272/human-cheetas-2","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a80e659d-9d65-474b-97fb-62f7fd036272/human-cheetas-2.jpg","altText":"A stone relief of a man holding two cheetahs by the tail","crdt":"PEJMAN AKBARZADEH/PERSIAN DUTCH NETWORK","dsc":"Scorpions flank a human figure with hoofed feet who has caught two cheetahs by their tails, on a chlorite artifact recovered from Jiroft.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Flooding in 2001 near Jiroft, Iran, exposed the ruins of an ancient necropolis from a Bronze Age culture that flourished alongside Mesopotamia.","title":"Buried for 4,000 years, this ancient culture could expand the 'Cradle of Civilization'","tags":[{"name":"History Magazine","id":"9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"30 years ago, thousands of tanks faced off on a desert battlefield. Today, ‘Fright Night’ still haunts these Gulf War veterans.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/untold-story-worlds-fiercest-tank-battle-gulf-war","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4814814814814814},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ce921b0-9b94-4494-8691-466a0599c1fd/NYC28999","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ce921b0-9b94-4494-8691-466a0599c1fd/NYC28999.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Steve McCurry, Magnum Photos","dsc":"KUWAIT. 1991. U.S. artillery shell Iraqi positions during the ground war.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"30 years ago, thousands of tanks faced off on a desert battlefield. Today, ‘Fright Night’ still haunts these Gulf War veterans.","title":"The untold story of the world’s fiercest tank battle","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"A shard of bone tells the story of a canine companion that trekked into an icy new world, providing clues to the migrations of the earliest Americans.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/oldest-dog-remains-in-americas-discovered-alaska","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3eafd669-c64d-45a0-b815-4c105da5dbbd/01-domesticated-dog-alaska","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3eafd669-c64d-45a0-b815-4c105da5dbbd/01-domesticated-dog-alaska.jpg","altText":"a sled dog in Greenland","crdt":"Photograph by Paul Nicklen, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"Portrait of a sled dog on Greenland's sea ice.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"A shard of bone tells the story of a canine companion that trekked into an icy new world, providing clues to the migrations of the earliest Americans.","title":"Oldest dog remains in Americas discovered in Alaska","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Daughter: “Just wish I could see you in person.” Mother: “I wish that more than anything in the world right now.”","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/text-messages-capture-heartbreaking-goodbyes-covid-19-victims","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5238095238095237},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4e732650-da71-497c-bf80-5119728f6e14/lost-goodbye-promo","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/4e732650-da71-497c-bf80-5119728f6e14/lost-goodbye-promo.jpg","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Daughter: “Just wish I could see you in person.” Mother: “I wish that more than anything in the world right now.”","title":"Text messages capture heartbreaking goodbyes of COVID-19 victims","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Hector and Achilles might have been the stars of Homer’s epic poem, but their helmets, shields, and weapons are what took center stage.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/arms-armor-ancient-greece-full-display-the-iliad","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.1246567819879187},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce4b04ba-82f2-41e1-b4a1-c353a464006d/green-helmet","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce4b04ba-82f2-41e1-b4a1-c353a464006d/green-helmet.jpg","altText":"A green helmet","crdt":"Peter Horree/Alamy","dsc":"Corinthian helmet, fifth century B.C. Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich, Germany.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Hector and Achilles might have been the stars of Homer’s epic poem, but their helmets, shields, and weapons are what took center stage.","title":"How do we know what ancient Greek warriors wore for battle? It's in 'The Iliad.'","tags":[{"name":"History Magazine","id":"9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Since 1973, more than 8,700 people in the U.S. have been sent to death row. At least 182 weren’t guilty—their lives upended by a system that nearly killed them.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/sentenced-to-death-but-innocent-these-are-stories-of-justice-gone-wrong","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5987509758001561},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e16a10c6-ff5f-4c58-b539-8ddac15562e7/death-row-og","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e16a10c6-ff5f-4c58-b539-8ddac15562e7/death-row-og.jpg","altText":"picture grid of death row exonerees","crdt":"Photograph by Martin Schoeller","dsc":"Top row, left to right: Sabrina Smith, Albert Burrell, Shujaa Graham, Joaquín José Martínez Bottom row, left to right: Kirk Bloodsworth, Perry Cobb, Damon Thibodeaux, Kwame Ajamu","ext":"jpg","ttl":"death-row-og-grid"},"abstract":"Since 1973, more than 8,700 people in the U.S. have been sent to death row. At least 182 weren’t guilty—their lives upended by a system that nearly killed them.","title":"Sentenced to death, but innocent: These are stories of justice gone wrong.","tags":[{"name":"Magazine","id":"9af83c1e-1fdc-3710-b252-c42eedb1b7c1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Years of archaeological research now suggest that Neolithic Britons lugged massive elements of the iconic monument from far-flung reaches of the island.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/3-ton-parts-stonehenge-may-carried-from-earlier-monuments","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.332465842550423},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c85fc9f8-8e50-48f5-a834-82df195a609c/05-waun-mawn-stonehenge","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c85fc9f8-8e50-48f5-a834-82df195a609c/05-waun-mawn-stonehenge.jpg","altText":"Stonehenge seen at nighttime","asstSrc":"unison","crdt":"Photograph by Kenneth Geiger, Nat Geo Image Collection","dsc":"The lights of Amesbury set low-hanging clouds aglow over Stonehenge.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Years of archaeological research now suggest that Neolithic Britons lugged massive elements of the iconic monument from far-flung reaches of the island.","title":"3-ton parts of Stonehenge may have been carried from earlier monuments","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Before humans ever dreamed of going into outer space, our early ancestors were already doing remarkable things with the night sky. Their intimate knowledge of the stars and planets lives on through folklore and practices that many don't think of as astronomy today.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/how-ancient-astronomy-mixed-science-with-mythology","text":"natgeo.ctaText.seeMore","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/17db1feb-f7ef-4e01-971f-5194a9f1e4f4/nge-ancient-astronomy-2021","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/17db1feb-f7ef-4e01-971f-5194a9f1e4f4/nge-ancient-astronomy-2021.jpg","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Before humans ever dreamed of going into outer space, our early ancestors were already doing remarkable things with the night sky. Their intimate knowledge of the stars and planets lives on through folklore and practices that many don't think of as astronomy today.","title":"How ancient astronomy mixed science with mythology","tags":[{"name":"History & Culture","id":"b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history"},{"name":"Nat Geo Explores","id":"f24405ad-de67-3a63-8612-a8daa94c5c1b","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/pages/topic/nat-geo-explores-video-series"}],"video":true},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"As a display of his strength, the king of this West African kingdom allowed his artisans to create ivory saltcellars for Portuguese merchants in the 1500s.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/world-history-magazine/article/ivory-saltcellar-reveals-colonial-power-dynamic-benin-portugal","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/b4bfb617-5d28-45b7-9acc-035da93e8e3c/benin-salt-og","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/b4bfb617-5d28-45b7-9acc-035da93e8e3c/benin-salt-og.jpg","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"As a display of his strength, the king of this West African kingdom allowed his artisans to create ivory saltcellars for Portuguese merchants in the 1500s.","title":"This ivory relic reveals the colonial power dynamic between Benin and Portugal","tags":[{"name":"History Magazine","id":"9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine"}]}],"heading":"History & Culture","pageInfo":{"endCursor":"MTE6UkZsT1FWOHdJMGxFT2tSU1RueGtjbTQ2YzNKak9tNWhkR2RsYnpwMWJtbHpiMjQ2T25CeWIyUTZZMk13TVRsalpXTXRNR1JpWWkwMFpXTXhMVGxtWVdVdFpqa3dNMlkyWkdZeFl6WXlJMU5QVWxRNmIzSnBaMmx1WVd4UWRXSnNhWE5vWldSRVlYUmxmREUyTVRJNE9EazBORE13TURBPQ","hasNextPage":true},"templateContext":"eyJjb250ZW50VHlwZSI6IlVuaXNvbkFydGljbGVDb250ZW50IiwidmFyaWFibGVzIjp7ImluY2x1ZGVNZWRpYUNvbnRlbnRzIjoidHJ1ZSIsImxvY2F0b3IiOiIvZW52aXJvbm1lbnQvYXJ0aWNsZS93aWRlbHktdXNlZC1pbnNlY3RpY2lkZXMtbWF5LWJlLWEtdGhyZWF0LXRvLW1hbW1hbHMtdG9vIiwicG9ydGZvbGlvIjoibmF0Z2VvIiwicXVlcnlUeXBlIjoiTE9DQVRPUiJ9LCJtb2R1bGVJZCI6bnVsbH0"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science","cmsType":"CarouselModule","centerHeading":true,"edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Thousands of quakes in southwestern Iceland could signal the beginning of a new period of heightened geologic activity that may last 100 years.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/swarm-of-earthquakes-shakes-iceland-are-volcanic-eruptions-next","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/30f865ab-dc98-40af-839e-a5af4828aa5c/iceland_JGDMRT","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/30f865ab-dc98-40af-839e-a5af4828aa5c/iceland_JGDMRT.jpg","altText":"geothermal field","crdt":"Photograph by Arterra Picture Library, Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"Seltun, geothermal field showing volcanic fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland","ext":"jpg","ttl":"iceland"},"abstract":"Thousands of quakes in southwestern Iceland could signal the beginning of a new period of heightened geologic activity that may last 100 years.","title":"A swarm of earthquakes shakes Iceland. Are volcanic eruptions next?","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"These are the COVID-19 vaccine prospects that have made it to phase three trials and beyond.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/coronavirus-vaccine-tracker-how-they-work-latest-developments-cvd","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5375375375375375},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fec83cd2-27b6-42b9-be50-299dad941df8/vaccine-1230603423","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fec83cd2-27b6-42b9-be50-299dad941df8/vaccine-1230603423.jpg","altText":"woman receives vaccine","crdt":"Photograph by Frederic J. Brown, AFP via Getty Images","dsc":"A registered nurse administers the COVID-19 vaccine into the arm of a woman at the Corona High School gymnasium in the Riverside County city of Corona, California on January 15, 2021, a day after California began offering the coronavirus vaccine to residents 65 and older. - US President-elect Joe Biden was set to announce his Covid-19 vaccine rollout plan Friday as he bids to wrest the focus from the impeachment of Donald Trump to the agenda for his first days in office. Biden has said he wants 100 million Americans to receive shots during his first 100 days in office, an ambitious goal that would require a big step up in the current pace of distribution. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)","ext":"jpg","ttl":"vaccine-1230603423"},"abstract":"These are the COVID-19 vaccine prospects that have made it to phase three trials and beyond.","title":"India’s Bharat Biotech says its COVID-19 vaccine is 81-percent effective","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"We know putting things off is bad for us. But an evolutionary battle in our brains can drive us to procrastinate—and lockdowns are adding fuel to the fire.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/are-you-procrastinating-more-blame-the-pandemic","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/77e8e446-c924-461a-a998-c4f55b8004a2/procrastination-1211735189","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/77e8e446-c924-461a-a998-c4f55b8004a2/procrastination-1211735189.jpg","altText":"Person is in an illuminated apartment","asstSrc":"Getty","crdt":"Photograph by Kirill Kudryavtsev, AFP via Getty Images","dsc":"A man is pictured in an illuminated apartment in a building on the outskirts of Moscow last year during a strict lockdown in Russia to stop the spread of the COVID-19 infection caused by the novel coronavirus.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Avoiding bedtime"},"abstract":"We know putting things off is bad for us. But an evolutionary battle in our brains can drive us to procrastinate—and lockdowns are adding fuel to the fire.","title":"Are you procrastinating more? Blame the pandemic.","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"As the Can Mata landfill expands in Catalonia, paleontologists are uncovering the bones of ancient species that are the precursors to apes—and us.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/priceless-primate-fossils-found-in-a-garbage-dump","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3342019543973942},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8e8729b8-b0ed-4fe2-a421-6f162ae885c4/MM9421_200708_000848","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8e8729b8-b0ed-4fe2-a421-6f162ae885c4/MM9421_200708_000848.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Paolo Verzone, National Geographic","dsc":"Abocador de Can Mata is one of the largest landfills in Spain. Since 2002, a team of paleontologists from the Miquel Crusafont Catalán Institute of Paleontology in Barcelona have found about 70,000 fossils from this period, when the region’s neotropical climate was becoming more arid.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Abocador de Can Mata"},"abstract":"As the Can Mata landfill expands in Catalonia, paleontologists are uncovering the bones of ancient species that are the precursors to apes—and us.","title":"The priceless primate fossils found in a garbage dump","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine is effective with just a single dose—but concerns swirl about lowered protection against one viral variant.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/johnson-johnson-us-third-vaccine-how-it-works","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.499267935578331},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/595f631e-5f0e-4f67-ad30-d9e763fa9aa6/johnsonandjohnsonvaccine-1230141900","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/595f631e-5f0e-4f67-ad30-d9e763fa9aa6/johnsonandjohnsonvaccine-1230141900.jpg","altText":"Johnson & Johnson vaccine canidate","crdt":"Photograph by Michael Ciaglo, Getty Images","dsc":"Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center investigational pharmacy technician Sara Berech holds a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine before it is administered in a clinical trial on December 15, 2020 in Aurora, Colorado. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine could be submitted for emergency use by late January and is the only vaccine among leading candidates given as a single dose.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"johnsonandjohnsonvaccine-1230141900"},"abstract":"Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine is effective with just a single dose—but concerns swirl about lowered protection against one viral variant.","title":"The U.S. may soon have a third vaccine. Here's how it works","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"By examining artificial systems with life-like qualities, Meiji University chemist seeks to better understand biological life.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/uncovering-lifes-operating-code","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1c5a53af-2762-48af-bace-5660cd0b5462/Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction_Meiji University_Japan","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1c5a53af-2762-48af-bace-5660cd0b5462/Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction_Meiji University_Japan.jpg","altText":"Image of petri dish featuring the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.","crdt":"Photograph courtesy Meiji University","dsc":"In this petri dish, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction—a nonlinear process that can oscillate between two different chemical states—is taking place.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"By examining artificial systems with life-like qualities, Meiji University chemist seeks to better understand biological life.","title":"Uncovering life’s operating code","tags":["Partner Content"]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"There will probably never be a perfect treatment to cure COVID-19—but the right medications for the right patients can save lives.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/new-drugs-identified-as-possible-tools-to-fight-covid-19","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5036075036075036},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e7db0681-7e96-4c77-ab6e-1124dfcc8cad/covidtreatment_20323240183363","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e7db0681-7e96-4c77-ab6e-1124dfcc8cad/covidtreatment_20323240183363.jpg","altText":"A medical worker attends to a coronavirus patient.","crdt":"Photograph by Brian Inganga, AP","dsc":"A medical worker attends to a coronavirus patient in the intensive care unit of an isolation and treatment center for those with COVID-19 in Machakos, south of the capital Nairobi, in Kenya Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. As Africa is poised to surpass 2 million confirmed coronavirus cases it is Kenya's turn to worry the continent with a second surge in infections well under way.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"There will probably never be a perfect treatment to cure COVID-19—but the right medications for the right patients can save lives.","title":"New drugs identified as possible tools to fight COVID-19","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"As drought brought severe water shortages to the people of Cape Town, it also inspired the use of some innovative water-saving products.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/partner-content-six-innovative-ways-water-was-saved","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8b96479f-79f3-4cef-9ac5-a87c65ae6e05/6-products-helped-to-beat-day-zero","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8b96479f-79f3-4cef-9ac5-a87c65ae6e05/6-products-helped-to-beat-day-zero.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Brent Stirton","dsc":"A fully loaded dishwasher uses 2.5 gallons (9.5 liters) of water, compared to hand washing dishes which uses around 14.5 gallons (66 liters) per act.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Dishwasher"},"abstract":"As drought brought severe water shortages to the people of Cape Town, it also inspired the use of some innovative water-saving products.","title":"Six products that helped beat Day Zero","tags":["Partner Content"]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"NASA captured historic footage of the Perseverance rover landing on Mars, as well as the first audio recorded on the red planet.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/watch-first-ever-video-of-a-spacecraft-landing-on-mars-from-nasa-perseverance-rover","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2ba0b75c-72c2-4e06-8891-ceeab291e229/PIA24428-High-Resolution_Still_Image_of_Perseverances_Landing","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2ba0b75c-72c2-4e06-8891-ceeab291e229/PIA24428-High-Resolution_Still_Image_of_Perseverances_Landing.jpg","crdt":"Photo from video by NASA/JPL/Caltech","dsc":"A camera aboard the descent stage captured video of Perseverance rover's successful landing. Tethered to the Skycrane, the rover a few meters away from a gentle touchdown.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"NASA captured historic footage of the Perseverance rover landing on Mars, as well as the first audio recorded on the red planet.","title":"Watch the first-ever video of a spacecraft landing on Mars","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Bombastic biochemist Kary Mullis invented PCR, a tool that redefined genetic science, while driving in 1983. That was only the beginning.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-eccentric-scientist-behind-the-gold-standard-covid-19-pcr-test","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.6679462571976967},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/212348c2-e1d1-4415-b754-05792fbad571/covid_15282590","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/212348c2-e1d1-4415-b754-05792fbad571/covid_15282590.jpg","altText":"Dr. Kary B. Mullis in his La Jolla, Calif. apartment, March 10, 1995","crdt":"Photograph by Jim Wilson, The New York Times/Redux","dsc":"Dr. Kary B. Mullis in his La Jolla, Calif. apartment, March 10, 1995. Mullis, a biochemist who won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering a way to analyze DNA easily and cheaply and thus pave the way for major advances in medical diagnostics, molecular biology and forensic science, died on Aug. 7, 2019 at his home in Newport Beach, Calif. He was 74.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Bombastic biochemist Kary Mullis invented PCR, a tool that redefined genetic science, while driving in 1983. That was only the beginning.","title":"The eccentric scientist behind the ‘gold standard’ COVID-19 test","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Adolescents are being tested now. Younger children will be next. Why did vaccine manufacturers wait to study them?","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/why-kids-need-their-own-covid-19-vaccine-trials","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.76025390625},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0465f1ec-ae7a-4b89-8188-9c9db3b9eaac/polio-109274461","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0465f1ec-ae7a-4b89-8188-9c9db3b9eaac/polio-109274461.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by PhotoQuest, Getty Images","dsc":"View of American scientist and physician Jonas Salk (1914 - 1995), developer of the polio vaccine, wearing a white lab coat, and smiling while holding up a bottle in the laboratory, mid twentieth century.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"polio"},"abstract":"Adolescents are being tested now. Younger children will be next. Why did vaccine manufacturers wait to study them?","title":"Why kids need their own COVID-19 vaccine trials","tags":[{"name":"Science","id":"2af51eeb-09a8-3bcf-8467-6b2a08edb76c","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science"},{"name":"Coronavirus Coverage","id":"a92c48ec-5e34-3b63-a1e1-2726bfc4c34e","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/topic/coronavirus-coverage"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-science-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"The COVID-19 pandemic sparked vaccine development at unprecedented speeds.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/paid-content-from-outbreak-to-immunity","text":"natgeo.ctaText.watch","icon":"play"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1930a77-6927-41bd-8845-40fbc538c00b/pfizer_kalamazoo_bc0120_201116_0767","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1930a77-6927-41bd-8845-40fbc538c00b/pfizer_kalamazoo_bc0120_201116_0767.jpg","altText":"a worker inspecting vials at Pfizer's manufacturing site in Kalamazoo, MI","asstSrc":"Custom shoot at Pfizer's facility in Kalamazoo, Michigan","crdt":"Photograph by Maddie McGarvey","dsc":"A worker inspects vials at the largest manufacturing site in the Pfizer network, located in Kalamazoo, MI.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Pfizer 2021 Article: From outbreak to immunity"},"abstract":"The COVID-19 pandemic sparked vaccine development at unprecedented speeds.","title":"From outbreak to immunity","tags":["Partner Content"],"video":true}],"heading":"Science","pageInfo":{"endCursor":"MTE6UkZsT1FWOHdJMGxFT2tSU1RueGtjbTQ2YzNKak9tNWhkR2RsYnpwMWJtbHpiMjQ2T25CeWIyUTZPR1l5T0RreU1EVXRORGRsTUMwME16WTFMV0V5WVRBdFpqQXhOVEV5Tm1VNE9HWXdJMU5QVWxRNmIzSnBaMmx1WVd4UWRXSnNhWE5vWldSRVlYUmxmREUyTVRNM05ETXlOVEF6TVRJPQ","hasNextPage":true},"templateContext":"eyJjb250ZW50VHlwZSI6IlVuaXNvbkFydGljbGVDb250ZW50IiwidmFyaWFibGVzIjp7ImluY2x1ZGVNZWRpYUNvbnRlbnRzIjoidHJ1ZSIsImxvY2F0b3IiOiIvZW52aXJvbm1lbnQvYXJ0aWNsZS93aWRlbHktdXNlZC1pbnNlY3RpY2lkZXMtbWF5LWJlLWEtdGhyZWF0LXRvLW1hbW1hbHMtdG9vIiwicG9ydGZvbGlvIjoibmF0Z2VvIiwicXVlcnlUeXBlIjoiTE9DQVRPUiJ9LCJtb2R1bGVJZCI6bnVsbH0"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel","cmsType":"CarouselModule","centerHeading":true,"edgs":[{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Halted by pandemic, heritage travelers turn to great reads that delve into ancestors’ often surprising histories.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/books-that-inspire-heritage-travel","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/207412dd-7b60-4a51-878f-6b9325cf1205/Travel Roots GettyImages-1163080414","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/207412dd-7b60-4a51-878f-6b9325cf1205/Travel Roots GettyImages-1163080414.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by NATALIJA GORMALOVA, AFP/Getty Images","dsc":"A young tourist watches fishing boats on the shores below Cape Coast Castle in Ghana. The white-washed fort was one of dozens studding the Atlantic coast where slaves were held before their journey to the New World.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Halted by pandemic, heritage travelers turn to great reads that delve into ancestors’ often surprising histories.","title":"Ancestry travel on pause? These books will inspire your next trip.","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"},{"name":"Book Club","id":"657a0bd3-fd27-36d9-8961-70d320a3a2f2","type":"series"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Forty-two falls splash down across the Shasta Cascade region. Here are five to see in one day.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/where-to-see-northern-california-most-spectacular-waterfalls","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/51dc6c2c-a55a-466f-bd3c-e0263589f9b0/20210301-EBPEKT","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/51dc6c2c-a55a-466f-bd3c-e0263589f9b0/20210301-EBPEKT.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by PictureLake, Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"Middle McCloud Falls on the McCloud River in Northern California in early morning.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Middle McCloud Falls, California"},"abstract":"Forty-two falls splash down across the Shasta Cascade region. Here are five to see in one day.","title":"Where to see northern California’s most spectacular waterfalls","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Volunteers are yanking the dangerous grasses from public lands across the American Southwest.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/volunteers-help-fight-invasive-buffelgrass-in-sonoran-desert-parks","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.4976923076923077},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e9cec88-dbe6-4909-b333-d1dafd1a748a/Travel Desert Weeds DT4YRR","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e9cec88-dbe6-4909-b333-d1dafd1a748a/Travel Desert Weeds DT4YRR.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Norma Jean Gargasz, Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"A staff member at Saguaro National Park East removes buffelgrass, a non-native plant which threatens the Sonoran Desert.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Volunteers are yanking the dangerous grasses from public lands across the American Southwest.","title":"Invasive grass is overwhelming U.S. deserts—providing fuel for wildfires","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Using frozen drums, horns, and harps, an emerging art form takes its cues from nature.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/playing-it-cool-these-artists-make-music-with-ice","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/78d065c6-2fe7-4b00-b7b1-8f204e75ec0a/IMFN Emile Holba for Maya Valetine Nat Geo Samples On 1","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/78d065c6-2fe7-4b00-b7b1-8f204e75ec0a/IMFN Emile Holba for Maya Valetine Nat Geo Samples On 1.jpg","altText":"man with ice instrument in front of the sun","crdt":"Photograph by Emile Holba","dsc":"Terje Isungset recording ice music on Baffin Island, Canada in -42 degrees.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Making Music with Ice"},"abstract":"Using frozen drums, horns, and harps, an emerging art form takes its cues from nature.","title":"Playing it cool: these artists make music with ice","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"More than 12 million Africans were forced from their homes and sold into slavery. These destinations tell their stories.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/charting-the-global-impact-of-slavery","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c8057370-e729-4a72-8add-68b1f8084613/DWMPWA","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c8057370-e729-4a72-8add-68b1f8084613/DWMPWA.jpg","altText":"Picture of a pink toned clay staircase","crdt":"Photograph by Robert Harding. Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"The Slave House, Island of Goree (Ile de Goree), UNESCO World Heritage Site, Senegal, West Africa, Africa","ext":"jpg","ttl":"history-of-slavery-04"},"abstract":"More than 12 million Africans were forced from their homes and sold into slavery. These destinations tell their stories.","title":"These 9 memorials trace the global impact of slavery","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"West Virginia’s New River Gorge National Park and Preserve is well-suited to welcoming adventurers in a time of pandemic.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/escape-crowds-at-newest-national-park-new-river-gorge-west-virginia","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.501466275659824},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/bc018e4e-a753-49a2-bb8e-ccd80074d313/New-River-Gorge-14","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/bc018e4e-a753-49a2-bb8e-ccd80074d313/New-River-Gorge-14.jpg","altText":"rafts going down rapids on the lower New River Gorge","crdt":"Photograph by Jay Young, Adventures on the Gorge","dsc":"Together, Upper, Middle (pictured) and Lower Keeney Rapids comprise the class-IV/V climax of the classic whitewater run, the Lower New River Gorge. If you’re looking for easier water, the family-friendly Upper New River routinely hosts children as young as six. Most of the outfitters here allow kids ages 6-11 to ride for free with a paying adult.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"New River Gorge rafting"},"abstract":"West Virginia’s New River Gorge National Park and Preserve is well-suited to welcoming adventurers in a time of pandemic.","title":"America’s newest national park is a haven for hiking, climbing, and rafting","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Volkswagen Beetles may have been discontinued, but restored and remade vintage models roll on, from Mexico City to San Miguel de Allende.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/punch-buggy-why-mexico-is-a-haven-for-car-buffs","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ccf3eea4-e407-4880-bbfd-82192e5458ed/Rose_Oaxaca Bugs_01","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ccf3eea4-e407-4880-bbfd-82192e5458ed/Rose_Oaxaca Bugs_01.jpg","altText":"People walking next to a volkswagen poking out from the corner","crdt":"Photograph by Adam Rose","dsc":"VW Beetles, or "vochos" as they're affectionately known in Mexico, are a common sight on the streets of Oaxaca.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Oaxaca Bug on the road"},"abstract":"Volkswagen Beetles may have been discontinued, but restored and remade vintage models roll on, from Mexico City to San Miguel de Allende.","title":"From ‘Herbie the Love Bug’ to punch buggy, the Beetle remains iconic in Mexico","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Seeking a sense of freedom, outdoor adventurers lace up for America’s frozen rivers and lakes.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/it-really-is-like-flying-explore-wild-skating-on-natures-ice","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7861d38c-983f-4902-a54b-4e373e0526a3/CP7FYA","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7861d38c-983f-4902-a54b-4e373e0526a3/CP7FYA.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Design Pics Inc., Alamy Stock Photo","dsc":"Woman ice skating among broken icebergs of Sheridan Glacier, Chugach Mountains near Cordova, Southcentral Alaska, Spring","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Seeking a sense of freedom, outdoor adventurers lace up for America’s frozen rivers and lakes.","title":"‘It really is like flying.’ Explore wild skating on nature’s ice","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Here’s how the legacy of the Maroon people contributes to the island’s independent spirit.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/legendary-community-that-fought-for-its-freedom-in-Jamaica","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/35f2fd75-3731-434b-847c-d2cddff9b1ee/Travel Maroons082A5482","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/35f2fd75-3731-434b-847c-d2cddff9b1ee/Travel Maroons082A5482.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Joshua Cogan","dsc":"Jamaican Maroons dance in Asufu Yard, a space for drumming, dancing and community meetings in the Charles Town Maroon village. This living museum provides visitors a way to learn about Maroon traditions, cultural and political history.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Dancing in the Asafu Culture Yard"},"abstract":"Here’s how the legacy of the Maroon people contributes to the island’s independent spirit.","title":"The legendary community that fought for its freedom in Jamaica","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"In Gloucester, maritime history and magical light lure visitors to the state’s lesser-known cape.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/why-this-salty-massachusetts-coastal-town-casts-a-spell-on-artists","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7d054c08-0125-44db-9d72-4416f7a78f83/resized-DJI_0754-Edit","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7d054c08-0125-44db-9d72-4416f7a78f83/resized-DJI_0754-Edit.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Isaac J Aiello, Discover Gloucester","dsc":"An aerial view of Gloucester, Massachusetts, shows off the coastal town’s fabled natural light.","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"In Gloucester, maritime history and magical light lure visitors to the state’s lesser-known cape.","title":"Why this salty Massachusetts coastal town hooks artists","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"For many parents, showing their kids the world is about both the past and the future.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/the-importance-of-travel-for-black-families","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.499267935578331},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/f803e9af-b5ce-4179-b600-d2be19dfcb5c/Black-family-travel-2","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/f803e9af-b5ce-4179-b600-d2be19dfcb5c/Black-family-travel-2.jpg","crdt":"Photograph by Tamir Kalifa, The New York Times/Redux","dsc":"Brittany Scullark and Elijah Wilson, 4, visit the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on Monday","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"For many parents, showing their kids the world is about both the past and the future.","title":"Families are leading a new wave for Black travelers","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"},{"name":"Race in America","id":"b30d5296-5ccb-3163-ab95-4ff2064e3bbc","type":"series","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/topic/race-in-america"}]},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-travel-tile","cmsType":"RegularStandardPrismTile","description":"Recovered from near extinction, the U.S. national bird is now abundant and easy to see.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/winter-is-prime-time-for-watching-eagles-heres-how-to-see-them","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.5003663003663004},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1cd5b036-4aac-4259-9895-cd5c0763fc2e/resized-GettyImages-1293382039","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1cd5b036-4aac-4259-9895-cd5c0763fc2e/resized-GettyImages-1293382039.jpg","asstSrc":"unison","crdt":"Getty Images","ext":"jpg","ttl":"Scenic overlook on the Palisades"},"abstract":"Recovered from near extinction, the U.S. national bird is now abundant and easy to see.","title":"Winter is prime time for watching bald eagles—here’s how","tags":[{"name":"Travel","id":"432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel"}]}],"heading":"Travel","pageInfo":{"endCursor":"MTE6UkZsT1FWOHdJMGxFT2tSU1RueGtjbTQ2YzNKak9tNWhkR2RsYnpwMWJtbHpiMjQ2T25CeWIyUTZNVGxpTlRFeU5XVXRaalpoWkMwME1qSmtMV0ZsWldRdE5UTXdZamxpWmpkbE1UUmpJMU5QVWxRNmIzSnBaMmx1WVd4UWRXSnNhWE5vWldSRVlYUmxmREUyTVRNd056RXpOREk1TVRjPQ","hasNextPage":true},"templateContext":"eyJjb250ZW50VHlwZSI6IlVuaXNvbkFydGljbGVDb250ZW50IiwidmFyaWFibGVzIjp7ImluY2x1ZGVNZWRpYUNvbnRlbnRzIjoidHJ1ZSIsImxvY2F0b3IiOiIvZW52aXJvbm1lbnQvYXJ0aWNsZS93aWRlbHktdXNlZC1pbnNlY3RpY2lkZXMtbWF5LWJlLWEtdGhyZWF0LXRvLW1hbW1hbHMtdG9vIiwicG9ydGZvbGlvIjoibmF0Z2VvIiwicXVlcnlUeXBlIjoiTE9DQVRPUiJ9LCJtb2R1bGVJZCI6bnVsbH0"},{"id":"natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-magazine","cmsType":"TileStackModule","trackImpression":false,"cardsDisplayed":5,"cta":{"text":"See More","url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine","target":"_self"},"heading":"Subscriber Exclusive Content","cards":[{"id":"natgeo-default-tilestack-m1-t1","cmsType":"FeaturedContentTile","description":"COVID-19 is a reminder of their destructive power, but they’re crucial to humans’ development and survival.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/article/viruses-can-cause-great-harm-but-we-could-not-live-without-them-feature","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.9201940035273368},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d26c9175-e810-4c0e-82fd-797fde842edc/viruses-embryo-og","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d26c9175-e810-4c0e-82fd-797fde842edc/viruses-embryo-og.jpg","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"COVID-19 is a reminder of their destructive power, but they’re crucial to humans’ development and survival.","theme":"dark","title":"How viruses shape our world","tags":[{"name":"Magazine","id":"9af83c1e-1fdc-3710-b252-c42eedb1b7c1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-default-tilestack-m1-t1","cmsType":"FeaturedContentTile","description":"Concerns about the dogs’ welfare and declining betting revenue have led tracks across the country to close in recent decades.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/greyhound-racing-decline-united-states","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.2503052503052503},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a200a601-b86d-489b-95eb-8879487089bb/mm9423_200724_01291","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/a200a601-b86d-489b-95eb-8879487089bb/mm9423_200724_01291.jpg","altText":"the profile of a greyhound","crdt":"Photograph by Erika Larsen","dsc":"tktk","ext":"jpg","ttl":"greyhound-racing"},"abstract":"Concerns about the dogs’ welfare and declining betting revenue have led tracks across the country to close in recent decades.","theme":"dark","title":"The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end","tags":[{"name":"Animals","id":"fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals"}]},{"id":"natgeo-default-tilestack-m1-t1","cmsType":"FeaturedContentTile","description":"Scheming invaders. Benevolent vegetarians. Climate refugees. As scientific exploration has advanced, so have creative interpretations of the red planet and its potential residents.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/article/see-how-people-have-imagined-life-on-mars-through-history-feature","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.7509765625},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0fa355b6-2da0-4f21-ab14-0c5f24305e96/mars-rover-cameras-fantastic-adventures","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0fa355b6-2da0-4f21-ab14-0c5f24305e96/mars-rover-cameras-fantastic-adventures.jpg","altText":"tall preacher shaking hands with human.","crdt":"Photograph by CHRONICLE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO","dsc":"1939 “The Man From Mars” Drawn by Frank R. Paul for Fantastic Adventures, this Martian is telepathic and can retract his eyes and nose to protect them from freezing.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"mars-rover-cameras-fantastic-adventures"},"abstract":"Scheming invaders. Benevolent vegetarians. Climate refugees. As scientific exploration has advanced, so have creative interpretations of the red planet and its potential residents.","theme":"dark","title":"See how people have imagined life on Mars through history","tags":[{"name":"Magazine","id":"9af83c1e-1fdc-3710-b252-c42eedb1b7c1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine"}]},{"id":"natgeo-default-tilestack-m1-t1","cmsType":"FeaturedContentTile","description":"Slated to land on Mars this month, the Perseverance rover will search for signs of past life and test new technologies for supporting future human missions.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/graphics/see-how-nasas-new-mars-rover-will-explore-the-red-planet-feature","text":"natgeo.ctaText.explore","icon":"interactive"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/881cfee1-85e1-49eb-8514-9944f56ef8d3/mars-rover-og","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/881cfee1-85e1-49eb-8514-9944f56ef8d3/mars-rover-og.jpg","ext":"jpg"},"abstract":"Slated to land on Mars this month, the Perseverance rover will search for signs of past life and test new technologies for supporting future human missions.","theme":"dark","title":"See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet","tags":[{"name":"Magazine","type":"sources"}]},{"id":"natgeo-default-tilestack-m1-t1","cmsType":"FeaturedContentTile","description":"The dusty red planet has fascinated us for centuries. Even as we learn more, its mysteries keep us in suspense.","ctas":[{"url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/article/why-are-people-so-dang-obsessed-with-mars-feature","text":"natgeo.ctaText.read","icon":"article"}],"img":{"crps":[{"nm":"raw","aspRto":0.92919921875},{"nm":"16x9","aspRto":1.7777777777777777},{"nm":"3x2","aspRto":1.5},{"nm":"square","aspRto":1},{"nm":"2x3","aspRto":0.6666666666666666},{"nm":"3x4","aspRto":0.75},{"nm":"4x3","aspRto":1.3333333333333333},{"nm":"2x1","aspRto":2}],"rt":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0aedd0ea-f5f8-45c1-a135-b092ef1e8d19/mars-rover-cameras-early-photo-mars","src":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/0aedd0ea-f5f8-45c1-a135-b092ef1e8d19/mars-rover-cameras-early-photo-mars.jpg","altText":"blurry photograph of Mars surface with dark spots.","crdt":"Photograph by E.C. Slipher, LOWELL OBSERVATORY ARCHIVES","dsc":"Early, blurry views of Mars inspired stories of canal-building aliens.","ext":"jpg","ttl":"mars-rover-cameras-early-photo-mars"},"abstract":"The dusty red planet has fascinated us for centuries. Even as we learn more, its mysteries keep us in suspense.","theme":"dark","title":"Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?","tags":[{"name":"Magazine","id":"9af83c1e-1fdc-3710-b252-c42eedb1b7c1","type":"sources","uri":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine"}]}],"loop":true}],"theme":"dark","cmsType":"EnhancedFrame"}],"meta":{"cnnicl":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","dsc":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","id":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688","mdfdDt":"2021-02-10T07:33:47.967Z","ttl":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","sctn":"Environment","sclDsc":"Neonicotinoids are already accused of contributing to widespread insect declines. But there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.","sclImg":"https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ee174945-868c-4550-b614-d8c48a5302e4/neonic-coated-seed-nationalgeographic_2290137.jpg?w=1200","sclImgHgt":799.8046875,"sclImgWdth":1200,"sclTtl":"These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too","adKvps":{"objid":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688"},"pgTxnmy":{"audiences":["General"],"genres":["News"],"sources":["Environment"],"subjects":["Pesticides","Insects","Mammals","Food and the Environment","Food Chain"]},"pblshDt":"2021-02-05T17:53:35.000Z","hreflngs":[{"lcl":"en-us","url":"https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too"}]},"prtfloFlgs":{"hideSharing":false,"hideSource":false},"config":{"ads":{"enabled":true,"insertedAdLimit":null,"insertedAdSpacing":900,"pzn":{"mode":"ltd","extra":true},"refreshInterval":30},"logoIcon":"ng-border","numLines":3,"type":"default","IMAGE_CONFIGS":{"large":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":767,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":1024,"screenWidth":1024},{"cropName":"raw","width":1260,"screenWidth":1440},{"cropName":"raw","width":1440}],"immersiveLdBg":{"img":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":767,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":1024,"screenWidth":1024},{"cropName":"raw","width":1260,"screenWidth":1440},{"cropName":"raw","width":1440}],"default":[{"cropName":"2x3","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"2x3","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"2x3","width":767,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":1024,"screenWidth":1024},{"cropName":"raw","width":1260,"screenWidth":1440},{"cropName":"raw","width":1440}]},"inline":{"x-small":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":636,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":300}],"small":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":636}],"medium":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":636,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":636,"screenWidth":1024},{"cropName":"raw","width":1280}],"large":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":767,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":1024,"screenWidth":1024},{"cropName":"raw","width":1260,"screenWidth":1440},{"cropName":"raw","width":1440}],"default":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":636}]},"playlist":{"player":[{"cropName":"raw","width":374,"screenWidth":374},{"cropName":"raw","width":413,"screenWidth":413},{"cropName":"raw","width":636}],"tile":[{"cropName":"raw","width":220,"screenWidth":767},{"cropName":"raw","width":300,"screenWidth":1119},{"cropName":"raw","width":195}]},"spnsrBanner":[{"cropName":"raw","height":32}],"tileStack":{"aspectRatio":0.75,"cropName":"3x4","width":400}}}}},"ads":{"kvps":[{"name":"pgtyp","value":"article"},{"name":"ed","value":"us"},{"name":"lang","value":"en"},{"name":"objid","value":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688"}]},"analytics":{"page_type":"article","page_url":"www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","page_id":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688","page_taxonomy":{"srcs":"Environment","frstSbj":"Pesticides","othrSbjs":"Insects, Mammals, Food and the Environment, Food Chain","gnres":"News","auds":"General"},"cntrbGrp":[{"contributors":[{"displayName":"Elizabeth Royte"}],"title":"By","rl":"Writer"}],"pbDt":"2021-02-05T17:53:35.000Z","hsImmrsvLd":true,"mdDt":"2021-02-10T07:33:47.967Z","wrdcnt":2769,"story_id":"drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:5abe6439-7f95-4192-8710-a4d7dd775688"}},"request":{"headers":{},"httpVersion":"1.1","method":"GET","url":"/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","vary":{"cached":true,"device":"pc","host":"www.nationalgeographic.com","path":"/environment/article/widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too","forwarded-proto":"https","country":"us","edition":"natgeo-en-us","edition-view":"natgeo-en-us","loggedin":"false"}},"viewport":{"width":1260,"height":0,"scrollX":0,"scrollY":0}}; //]]> Source link
source https://fikiss.net/these-widely-used-insecticides-may-be-a-threat-to-mammals-too/ These widely used insecticides may be a threat to mammals too published first on https://fikiss.net/ from Karin Gudino https://karingudino.blogspot.com/2021/03/these-widely-used-insecticides-may-be.html
0 notes
aspiestvmusings · 2 months ago
Text
WV PARALLELS
SPOILERS for WandaVision..up to ep 8
PARALLELS, CALLBACKS,  FORESHADOWING... DETAILS..
throughout WV & MCU: 
First look at Westview Wanda driving through WestView as she first arrives in reality - the town & the people seem in a non-happy state (people alone & depressed, town in ruins, she alone) in 1x08 flashback VS Wanda & Vision driving through WestView as they first arrive in the TV freality (everyone fake-happy & not alone, buildings & businesses flourishing  in 1x01
Wanda creating new "life" Wanda's birthing screams & energy spending: Wanda "giving birth" to Vision in ep 8 VS Wanda giving birth to the twins in ep 3. I feel like in a way her subconcious was reminding her of the "birthing pains"
Heart & abbreviating The heart drawn on the wall calendar on the date Friday, August 23rd was an abbreviation & was referring to Vision's boss & his wife coming to dinner in 1x01... when neither could remember the significance of the heart or date. Also... "Who needs to abbreviate?" (when theyre both superheroes) VS The heart Vision drew on the property deed of the land he bought for them. Next to the text "to grow old in" - V. (abbreviating his name) in the 1x08 flashback VS The heart on the calendar on the Date Wednesday the 10th in the opening credits for Wandas sitcom freality in 1x07 VS The heart on top of a building in the 1x02 episode sitcom intro
  Skeleton in the closet In 1x01 Vision tells his boss Mr. Hart that no, he does not have a skeleton, when he's asked if he has a skeleton in his closet VS In the 1x02 sitcom opening credits we see Vision go through walls & floor/ceiling. As he moves downstairs from the closet we see wht appears to be a spider & spiderweb there. And... bones.
Flourish! Vision as the magician Illusion using the phrase "fllourish!" for his magic tricks (that Agatha messes up & Wanda corrects) in the TV-freality in 1x02 VS Wanda after seing the state of the town & people (that to her seem like her own experience) making the place flourish (alive again)! 1x08 flashback
Stop it! Ms. Hart keeps saying "Stop it!" (with more & more concerned voice) as Mr. Hart chokes in 1x01 VS Wanda keeps saying "Stop it!" (with more & more concerned voice) when she sees Visions body being dismantled...like a machine in the 1x08 flashback.
  To grow old in... Vision's plan was for them to move from big city to a small town, build a house & start a family/life together. Grow old together (even if he as a synthezoid presumbly doesn't grow old like Wanda as human would. Though maybe his human form could & perhaps she as  Nexus being/witch can/will live for centuries..but they didn't know it back then?) as he had planned their life together in IW (making me suspicious if they got engaged or something...) as revealed in WV 1x08 flashback to the property deed that lead Wanda to WestView VS Wanda creating a sitcom world where decades change...she literally created an alternate reality where they live his plan for them..they grow old together..in a small town... as seen throughout the WV show...
  Watching sitcoms on TV: Wanda & Vision family watching TV  every night before going to bed in Wanda's TV freality on WV VS Wanda watching TV with her family in Sokovia - the last happy memory before trauma hit her (1x08 flashback scene) VS Wanda & Vision first bonding at the Avengers compound while watching TV together (1x08 flashback scene). He's learning "being human" with her help & she's learning about dealing with her trauma with his help.
  Traditional Sokovian greeting In 1x01 Vision saves the day by calling Wanda covering the bosses eyes with her hands " a traditional sokovian greeting" when she thinks she's welcoming her husband home VS in the 1x08  flashback to her childhood we see that her mother covers her eyes with her hands the same way. Yet another subconcious detail from her real life.
Made-up superhero names: Hayward asking JImmy in 105 is Wanda has an alias or nickname “No funny nickname?” VS in 1x08 Agatha giving her a “nickname/alias when she says "...and that makes you The Scarlett Witch" ... Only...in this context it seems more like  royal title than a superhero nickname.
Shakespeare Vision quoting Shakespeare in WV 1x02 VS Shakespeare mention related to Trevor Slattery in IM3
 Universe of Colour
The paint cans that Wanda & Vision use to paint the nursery in WV episode 1x03 are Simser brand (crew member), but they also feauture other text, like "universe of color"VS the colours of each charactes magic...will make up a whoe spectrum/rainbow...especially in finale battle...
All these colours combined...give you the colours of the rainbow (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet)...so  do expect there to be a rainbow above WestView...at the end of WV, cause that would tie into the coours of the different magic + it never raining/always being sunny in sitcom reality as it does rain outside the reality...and the spectrum (Monica's powers) of colours of a rainbow appear to us when sunshine + rain are combined
Wanda's magic powers are red (like aether/reality stone...and she can warp reality, even though her powers were amplified by the yelllow mind stone).
Vision's magic powers are yellow (just like the Mind Stone that gave him life)
Monica's magic powers are blue ("thanks to her connection to Captain Marvel, who got her powers form the blue space stone?")
Agatha's powers are purple...with a bit of black mixed to it (like the power stone is...but she seems to absorb others powers that are other colour: the blue magic of the other witches in her coven & the red magic of Wanda's)
Billy's/Wiccan's powers are ???
Tommy's/Speed's powers are ???
Fietro's/Quicksilvers powers are ???
Dr.Strange's powers are orange (like the soul stone, even if his task is to protect the green time stone)
Dottie's colour is yellow...it seems...based on her flowers.
Mind-reading & Visions of the future/past Wanda reading Tony's mind in &  showing him a vision of the future trama...amplifying his deep fears about not being able to save the world & Ccommenting how she didnt need to do much, because he was so ful of self doubt, fear & all that.. in A2: AoU VS Agatha reading Wanda's mind & showing her visios of her past trauma...amplifying her deep sorrow & commenting how she is so full of self doubt & hope that it didnt take much to trick her with Fietro.... in WV 1x08
I just (can't) feel you
When the Mind Stone keeps "hurting" Vision, Wanda "reads the stones mind" says "I just feel you" to Vision in the beginning of A3:IF VS As Wanda is destroying the Mind Stone & Vision is dying, too, he tels her "You could never hurt me. I just feel you" at the end of A3:IW VS When Wanda is trying to connect to/with Vision on the table at SWORD, she cannot & she says "I can't feel you" in the 1x08 flashback scene.
Visions of the dead Wanda seeing Vision dressed as the WV character, but looking exactly like when he died in A3: IW w. the mindstone ripped out... in WV 1x0? VS Wanda seeing Fietro dressed as the WV character, but looking exactly like when he died in A2AoU w. the bulletholes in the shirt in WV 1x06 VS Peter seeing Tony as an Iron-Zombie rising from the grave in the illusion Mysterio created to play tricks on him in SM2: FFH
  Hammers Wanda giving Vision the meat tenderizer (it looks like a small hammer) & him holding it in WV ep 1x01 VS Vision lifting & giving Thor's hammer (Mjölnir) to Thor in A2: AoU
  Plants When Agnes introduces hersef to the new neighbours she brings a plants as a housewarming gift in WV episode 1x01 VS This is the first things that glitches in episode 1x07 as Wanda "loses control" of reality
The fallen pose Vision in A3: IW after Thanos killed him VS Vision in WV ep 1x06/1x07 after exiting the hex & faling apart VS Monica in WV ep 1x03 /1x04 after being thrown out from the hex VS Nat in A4:E after falling on Vormir...
Half of the universe When we see Wanda drive through Westview as she first arrives we see that she sees only half of the people - everyone she sees is alone... it's like half of the people are still missing (even if the blip happened & the missing are returned). Westview looks like the world during the 5 years she missed, half of everything gone, people missing their otehr half. This is excty how she is feeling & exactly what happened to her in A3: IW...Thanos first took half of her away by kiling Vision, and when she returned her world was still in the same state...she did not get the happy ending (that Tony talked about in his goodbye message & what the news report on screens...about happy family reunions)...her worls is still in ruins...figuratively & literally... as is WestView...at first glance...to her. The state of WV in the flashback represents the state of the universe during the five years she was gone.
  SNAP "Sugar Snaps" - the name of the breakfast cereal Wanda eats in 1x07 VS word SNAP is on a billboard for Lagos towels in WV 1x08 flashback VS  Thanos snapping his fingers in A3: IW & wiping half of he universe "out of existence" VS  Agnes snaps her fingers in 1x08 as the illusion fades..and she sits in audience VS Agens’ line “this menu can be done in a snap” in ep 1x01 
Life under a dome/hex (bubble): Wakanda is located inside a giant protective dome/bubble - an "invisible" energy field protects it & the barrier stops intruders VS Wanda creates a giant protective dome/bubble (hex-shaped) around WestView - an "invisible" energy field that stops people from entering or exiting...
STAGES OF GRIEF The show is abotu the past, and the future. About different realities. About grief, loss & moving on. About the stages of grief. If you pay attention  you can see references to eaach stage in Wanda’s behaviour throughout the episodes... 
10 = X The age when Wanda's powers manifested... probability hex...was age 10  VS When Billy & Tommys powers manifested... mind reading & speed they were 10 VS 10 = X (roman numerals) = X-gene (mutants)
Hero or Villain "Be good" - Vision to Wanda, WV 1x06 VS "I can be good" - Agatha & "No, you cannot" - Agatha's mom, WV 1x08 flashback
Wanda VS Tony "Don't let them make you the villain" - Monica & "Maybe I already am" - Wanda. WV 1x07 = The world sees Wanda as a villain (after Lagos, during the Hex), & she's struggled with this all her life. She is afraid of her own powers, just like regular people are. She doesn't fully understand them either. Vision was the only one who didn't see her as the villain. She is punishing herself for her mistakes. In many ways her backstory, and story arc, and mental state are very similar to Tony's. 
  Grief Monica & Wanda - their experiences are similar. Both blipped, lost loved one...twice. Both grieving... The way Monica describes the feeling she felt when under Wanda’s mind control = is the same as Wanda explained her feelings to Vision in the Flashback to Avengers compound “drowning...” 
Control vs Chaos Wanda can & does control everyone & everything within the hex, except: Vision (though she cerated him & he is essentially part of her, she can't control him), the Twins (she can't control them with her powers, and they have powers of their own, separate from hers and Visions), Fietro (who is under Agathas spell...in a way) & Agatha (who plays along), and later on Monica. Everything & everyone follows her script & directions...exctly, but not these superpowered individuals.
People think that order & chaos are opposites - Vision, A2: AoU
Wanda & Vision are connected in many ways. They've been connected even before they met. Both got powered up by the Mind Stone. Which awakened the magical powers in Wanda & gave life to Visions corporal form. They are also connected via Tony Stark: Wanda's trauma was caused by Tony's past mistakes & Vision's humanity was created by Tony’s attempts to build a better future. They are so much of the same MIND STONE. He's science & order and she's magic & chaos... two sides of the same thing... Vision started out as Jarvis & was supposed to be all about order (he started out as pure science...trech). Jarvis is in many ways Tony's best creation - he's all good. But Wanda is chaos..that she needs to learn to control (Agatha didn’t find a teacher, Wanda should...)
It’d be too long if I’d inlude also the commercials & the group chants “this is all for the children” (not expained yet, will be ...soon) So a lot is missing from this list... 
1 note · View note