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#Public Health
emblematik · an hour ago
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John Moon can still remember what the emergency services provided by the police were like  in Pittsburgh in the 1960s, “The public was faced with … ‘swoop and scoop’ which meant you’d call the police and they’d pick you up, throw you in the back of a paddywagon, and rush you off to the hospital.” They could do little more than offer patients basic first-aid, a canvas stretcher, a half-empty oxygen tank, and a pillow, which often only served to choke off your airway. “And on top of that,” says Moon, “both officers got up front.” The patient was left to fend for themselves in the back of the police van. If you stopped breathing in the backseat, there was no one there to assist you.
But if Pittsburgh’s services were typical of the country at the time, the emergency care provided in the largely Black Hill District was even worse. Pittsburgh’s mostly white police force was often slow to respond to emergencies in the Hill, while many Black residents, were reluctant to even call the police to begin with. No one wanted to get in the exact same police van the cops had threatened to throw them in yesterday. For Moon and others in the Hill District, the police weren’t just bad at providing emergency medical care, they were the wrong people for the job, and the same was true to varying degrees in the rest of the country. Whether a neighborhood was served by the police, the fire department, or the local funeral home, so long as the priority was transportation as opposed to treatment, no one even realized there was a “job” that needed doing.
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deadgodjess · 5 hours ago
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For today's accomplishment I managed to get my $700+ prescription down to $40 (or even less if they accept my coupon) by switching to Costco.
If you haven't yet everyone REALLY needs to check out GoodRX. They have a GREAT drug discount program that's FREE and also will show you the best prices for your area to get the best value. I could potentially end up spending only $11 for what was going to be a $728 medication!
You're not always going to get so steep a discount (for example the cheapest i saw Lantus, a brand of insulin that generally goes for around $500 was $337, but that's over $100 and could potentially make all the difference for people trying to keep up on their meds.
GoodRX can NOT be used in combination with you insurance, medicare or medicaid but can be used in it's place, so especially for folks on private insurance it can be a great resource for saving money.
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thescientificinquirer · 6 hours ago
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The Daily Dose: Biden Administration to set up $1.7 billion network to track Coronavirus variants.
The Daily Dose: Biden Administration to set up $1.7 billion network to track Coronavirus variants.
The U.S. is setting up a $1.7 billion national network to identify and track worrisome coronavirus mutations whose spread could trigger another pandemic wave, the Biden administration announced Friday. “White House officials unveiled a strategy that features three components: a major funding boost for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments to ramp up…
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Rural-urban divide compounds racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths, study finds
Rural-urban divide compounds racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths, study finds
While Black, Hispanic, Latino, Indigenous, Asian and Pacific Islander people are more likely to die of COVID-19 than white people nationwide, a recent study from Oregon State University found the risk was even greater for racial and ethnic minority groups living in rural areas compared with urban areas. To address the disparities, researchers say the health care response to COVID-19, including…
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Differences in national food security best explained by household income, not agriculture
Differences in national food security best explained by household income, not agriculture
One of the most comprehensive statistical analyses of drivers of food insecurity across 65 countries has concluded that household income consistently explains more discrepancy in food security than any other factor, including agricultural land resources and production. The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth study, “Cross-national analysis of food security drivers: comparing results based…
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thelocalnewsma · 9 hours ago
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Small vaccine clinic set for April 20 in Gloucester
Small vaccine clinic set for April 20 in Gloucester #GloucesterMA
GLOUCESTER — The health department has announced it is partnering with Gloucester Family Health Center to hold a small vaccine clinic next week. The clinic will be held on Tuesday, April 20, at the Rose Baker Senior Center on Manuel F. Lewis Street. At the clinic, 100 doses of the Moderna vaccine will be distributed, and a subsequent clinic will also be offered to offer those individuals their…
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A method to assess COVID-19 transmission risks in indoor settings
A method to assess COVID-19 transmission risks in indoor settings
Two MIT professors have proposed a new approach to estimating the risks of exposure to Covid-19 under different indoor settings. The guideline they developed suggests a limit for exposure time, based on the number of people, the size of the space, the kinds of activity, whether masks are worn, and the ventilation and filtration rates. Their model offers a detailed, physics-based guideline for…
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Research shows to disrupt online extremism freewill is key
Research shows to disrupt online extremism freewill is key
Douglas Wilbur ’14, a visiting Ph.D. scholar in the Department of Communication at UTSA, has published a study that shows how researchers can craft message campaigns to protect individuals from adopting extremist views. According to his research, when people are explicitly told that they are free to accept or reject propagandistic claims, the likelihood of choosing a moderate view increases. This…
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thescientificinquirer · 19 hours ago
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This is how to build a public health city.
This is how to build a public health city.
Most people by now have memorized the public health guidelines meant to help minimize transmission of COVID-19: wash your hands, wear a mask, keep six feet apart from others. That part is easy. What some may not realize is that upholding these guidelines in certain urban areas can present new challenges. For example, how are you supposed to stay six feet apart from other people when the…
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Reliable COVID-19 short-term forecasting | EurekAlert! Science News
Reliable COVID-19 short-term forecasting | EurekAlert! Science News
A new study by Texas A&M University researchers published in PLOS ONE details a new model for making short-term projections of daily COVID-19 cases that is accurate, reliable and easily used by public health officials and other organizations. Led by Hongwei Zhao, professor of biostatistics at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, researchers used a method based on the SEIR (susceptible, exposed,…
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shieldmaiden-of-christ · 19 hours ago
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Watch "Maddie's Story" on YouTube
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Child suffers severe adverse reactions during ongoing covid vaccine child testing
Please pray for this child!
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themedicalstate · 19 hours ago
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Regular Exercise May Help Protect Against Severe Covid
More exercise means less risk of developing severe Covid, according to a compelling new study of physical activity and coronavirus hospitalizations. The study, which involved almost 50,000 Californians who developed Covid, found that those who had been the most active before falling ill were the least likely to be hospitalized or die as a result of their illness.
So, for the new study, which was published Tuesday in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers and physicians at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, the University of California, San Diego, and other institutions decided to compare information about how often people exercised with whether they wound up hospitalized this past year because of Covid.
Now, the researchers drew anonymized records for 48,440 adult men and women who used the Kaiser health care system, had their exercise habits checked at least three times in recent years and, in 2020, had been diagnosed with Covid-19. The researchers grouped the men and women by workout routines, with the least active group exercising for 10 minutes or less most weeks; the most active for at least 150 minutes a week; and the somewhat-active group occupying the territory in between.
The researchers gathered data, too, about each person’s known risk factors for severe Covid, including their age, smoking habits, weight, and any history of cancer, diabetes, organ transplants, kidney problems and other serious, underlying conditions.
Then the researchers cross checked numbers, with arresting results. People in the least-active group, who almost never exercised, wound up hospitalized because of Covid at twice the rate of people in the most-active group, and were subsequently about two-and-a-half times more likely to die. Even compared to people in the somewhat-active group, they were hospitalized about 20 percent more often and were about 30 percent more likely to die.
Of the other common risk factors for severe disease, only advanced age and organ transplants increased the likelihood of hospitalization and mortality from Covid more than being inactive, the scientists found. “Being sedentary was the greatest risk factor” for severe illness, “unless someone was elderly or an organ recipient,” says Dr. Robert Sallis, a family and sports medicine doctor at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center, who led the new study. And while “you can’t do anything about those other risks,” he says, “you can exercise.”
Of course, this study, because it was observational, does not prove that exercise causes severe Covid risks to drop, but only that people who often exercise also are people with low risks of falling gravely ill. The study also did not delve into whether exercise reduces the risk of becoming infected with coronavirus in the first place.
But Dr. Sallis points out that the associations in the study were strong. “I think, based on this data,” he says, “we can tell people that walking briskly for half an hour five times a week should help protect them against severe Covid-19.” A walk — or five — might be especially beneficial for people awaiting their first vaccine, he adds. “I would never suggest that someone who does regular exercise should consider not getting the vaccine. But until they can get it, I think regular exercise is the most important thing they can do to lessen their risk. And doing regular exercise will likely be protective against any new variants, or the next new virus out there.”
By Gretchen Reynolds (The New York Times).
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ACP and AHA partner on new open access journal-Annals of Internal Medicine: Clinical Cases
ACP and AHA partner on new open access journal-Annals of Internal Medicine: Clinical Cases
PHILADELPHIA, Thursday, April 15, 2021 — The American College of Physicians (ACP), publisher of Annals of Internal Medicine (Annals), one of the most influential peer-reviewed clinical journals in the world, and the American Heart Association (AHA) today announce a new partnership to jointly publish Annals of Internal Medicine: Clinical Cases (AIMCC). The digital, open access, peer-reviewed…
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Child Mind Institute's CRISIS survey yields insights to psychological impact of COVID-19
Child Mind Institute’s CRISIS survey yields insights to psychological impact of COVID-19
To better understand the psychological and physical impact caused by the profound consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic – and also inform priorities for interventions and policy changes to address the mental health consequences of the pandemic — researchers from the Center for the Developing Brain at the Child Mind Institute developed and deployed the CoRonavIruS health and Impact Survey…
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Can financial stress lead to physical pain in later years?
Can financial stress lead to physical pain in later years?
Financial stress can have an immediate impact on well-being, but can it lead to physical pain nearly 30 years later? The answer is yes, according to new research from University of Georgia scientists. The study, published in Stress & Health, reveals that family financial stress in midlife is associated with a depleted sense of control, which is related to increased physical pain in later…
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hormonesandsass · a day ago
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Job interview a week from today for a position in DENVER, ahh!!
So nervous for so many reasons.
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RUSSIALINK: "Covid-19 may become chronic condition - Russian Academician Chuchalin" - Interfax
RUSSIALINK: “Covid-19 may become chronic condition – Russian Academician Chuchalin” – Interfax
MOSCOW. April 15 (Interfax) – The examinations of people who have had Covid-19 show that it may become a chronic condition, Academician Alexander Chuchalin, a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) and director of the Department of Hospital Therapy at the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, said on Thursday. “Covid as a chronic condition. Please, pay attention to how I…
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