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#Music Album Reviews
thelatetothegameblog · 25 minutes ago
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Stand Out Albums: The Posies 'Dear 23' (1990)
Stand Out Albums: The Posies ‘Dear 23’ (1990)
Stand Out Albums has been a showcase for my favorite albums across the vast performers that I love.  Covering a little bit of everything from classic rock to country hits, much like Key Movies of My Life, it has been the albums that shaped me.  This year, I am taking a slightly different approach by discussing the discographies of my favorite musicians, album by album, in release order. Last…
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ghostcultmagazine · 38 minutes ago
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ALBUM REVIEW: Wreche - All My Dreams Came True - Handmade Records
ALBUM REVIEW: Wreche – All My Dreams Came True – Handmade Records
The concept of metal without electric guitars might feel like an oxymoron. After all, guitar riffs of one type or another have been the key bedrock of the genre ever since Black Sabbath. But Wreche is different. John Steven Morgan, the multi-instrumentalist and vocalist behind the band, makes a kind of experimental black metal using acoustic piano as the lead instrument. All My Dreams Came True…
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nethudara · 9 hours ago
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Squid - Bright Green Field Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3eSViBJ
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nethudara · 9 hours ago
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India Jordan - Watch Out! EP Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/33RGVY9
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nethudara · 12 hours ago
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Jack Ingram/Miranda Lambert/Jon Randall - The Marfa Tapes Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3bAQkrl
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nethudara · 15 hours ago
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Lucy - The Music Industry Is Poisonous Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/33Q69pN
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brizzyfrizzy · 22 hours ago
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Katy Perry, Electric | Track Review 🎵
Katy Perry, “Electric” | Track Review 🎵
Grammy-nominate pop superstar Katy Perry proves she’s still got it on her electrifying Pokemon single, “Electric.” There’s lots to like about “Electric” being honest.  The production (🎛 The Monsters & Strangerz, 🎛 Bruce Wiegner, and 🎛 German) is terrific – big, bright, sleek, and incredibly warm.  The sound and over aesthetic is very 2021, which is a great look for a pop star whose heyday was…
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nethudara · a day ago
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Green-House - Music for Living Spaces Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3waKmWa
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nethudara · a day ago
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Tony Allen - There Is No End Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3ydWQxX
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nethudara · a day ago
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Fiver - Fiver With the Atlantic School of Spontaneous Composition Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3w2lFuW
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nethudara · a day ago
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Daniel Bachman - Axacan Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3eWihfz
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passionate-reply · a day ago
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This week on Great Albums: Ministry’s 1983 debut, With Sympathy! It’s not a metal album, and it’s not even an industrial album--it’s just some damn good synth-pop, despite who made it! Whether you’re curious where Uncle Al got his start and why he hates his first LP, or you just want some excellent New Romantic music, you should check this one out. Full transcript of the video under the break, as always.
Welcome to Passionate Reply, and welcome to Great Albums! Today, I’ll be tackling the debut album of one of the best-loved industrial bands--though it actually isn’t all that “industrial.” This is With Sympathy by Ministry, first released in 1983. Ministry are one of those acts that have gone through many stylistic evolutions throughout their career, and if you’re familiar with some of their more acclaimed works, it may surprise you to learn where they started out. While With Sympathy was the first full LP released under the Ministry name, it’s not the very first thing in their discography--that honour goes to the 12” single “I’m Falling,” released in 1981.
Music: “I’m Falling”
With a springy post-punk bass line and a tinny mechanical rhythm, “I’m Falling” is a rough-edged piece of cold wave. It was released on the famous Wax Trax! Records, well-known as the home of many of the most illustrious industrial acts of the 80s and 90s, from Coil and Laibach to Meat Beat Manifesto. But for their follow-up LP, Ministry would work with a major label, Arista, and twist that bass-heavy sound into something with less hiss and more groove.
Music: “Effigy”
On the opening track, “Effigy,” a bright synth line artfully fences an electric guitar riff for dominance, showing the extent to which the sonic blueprint of British New Wave acts like A Flock of Seagulls prefigured With Sympathy. This is an album that could only have been conceived in 1983, in the full flush of synth-pop’s mainstream popularity, and it does feel like a cash-in on the success that imported European synth-pop achieved in the first few years of the 1980s--even in Ministry’s native America.
While I’ve covered some albums with somewhat controversial legacies before, With Sympathy probably sets the record for the work that’s most despised by its own creator: Ministry frontman Al Jourgensen has disowned this album even harder than Ralf Huetter did the Kraftwerk albums before Autobahn, even going so far as to claim its affable, fairly commercial sound was entirely the product of Arista’s executive meddling. As with all legends of how great art was made, I don’t particularly believe or disbelieve this legend, or think it’s possible to know if it’s “true”--I simply present it to you as a piece of context, a myth that informs the history of this work. It’s worth noting that the acerbic, aggressive track “Here We Go” is often held up as a form of evidence for this story.
Music: “Here We Go”
The lyrics of “Here We Go” seem to imply that the song is, itself, intended as some sort of offering to the pop charts, but the confrontational style of the vocals is hard to overlook. I suppose it’s somewhat catchy, but not exactly in the same way that a real hit song is--there’s a certain fetching incompetence behind it, that makes its energy that much more compelling. “Here We Go” was released as a single, but only as the fourth selection from the album to receive that honour. A similar quality of dissonance between words and music can be found on the closing track, “She’s Got a Cause.”
Music: “She’s Got a Cause”
Like so many pop-leaning albums by artists who belong more on the underground side of things, With Sympathy has this constant tension bubbling within, and that crass, subversive industrial mindset is straining within the soft prettiness of its synth textures. The darkly playful “She’s Got a Cause” presents us with a narrator who seems to enjoy an idealized abuse at the hands of their lover, in a manner that’s reminiscent of the common industrial preoccupation with sado-masochism. And yet, it sounds downright bubbly--surprisingly so for a closing track, too. The album’s third single, “Work For Love,” is another that plays with this dysfunctional relationship theme.
Music: “Work For Love”
With tight handclap percussion, a call-and-response hook, and even a rhythm break, “Work For Love” certainly delivers on a “work chant” feel. Like “She’s Got a Cause,” it’s a very fun track, on the surface, but the more you think about its gleeful commodification of love and intimacy, the more sour it seems. Given the expected hard R in “work,” this seems like as good a time as any to note frontman Al Jourgensen’s apparent decision to ape something of a working-class English accent, by far one of the most derided features of With Sympathy. Personally, though I’ve never found this all that offensive--there are many styles of music in which vocalists adopt something of a trade cant, and the conventional twang of country singers is as much of a stylistic convention of the music as country guitar. I tend to see a person’s art as a deliberately crafted creation, where the self might be re-imagined in creative ways, and I think the unrelenting demand for complete “authenticity” from artists is little more than rockist hogwash. But that’s just me.
The cover of With Sympathy is one that really puts the capital-R “Romantic” in “New Romantic.” An artfully splayed hand, with very vampish black nails, gestures ambiguously towards wilting, crumbling red roses, an iconic symbol of the impermanence of youth, love, and idealism. The out-of-focus backdrop for the image might be interpreted as veined marble, adding a classicizing touch, or perhaps a stormy sky filled with lightning, adding to the sense of melodrama. The title “With Sympathy” calls attention to the album’s gothic morbidity in a gleefully tongue-in-cheek fashion, and I wish it weren’t so easy to miss on the cover, placed as red-on-red text in the middle of the roses.
As I hinted at earlier, Ministry have never made anything else that sounds similar to With Sympathy. Their second LP, 1986’s Twitch, is a marked sonic departure, featuring harsh, mechanistic industrial assaults. An extremely different album, for sure, but one that I also like quite a lot, in its own way! By the 1990s, Ministry would adopt an increasingly guitar-driven sound, eventually blossoming from industrial into full-blown heavy metal--a transformation that makes With Sympathy look even more bizarre in the context of their catalogue.
Music: “Over the Shoulder”
While I’ve provided a lot of contextual information about With Sympathy, I do want to mention that when I first discovered this album as a teenager, I didn’t know much about industrial music at all, let alone Ministry. And I loved the album! At the end of the day, I think With Sympathy is a very enjoyable New Romantic album, in a vacuum, and I’d recommend it to anyone who’s interested in early 80s synth-pop. Don’t let those later metal albums scare you away from some damn good pop.
My favourite track on With Sympathy is “I Wanted To Tell Her,” the album’s second single. It gets off to a great start, playfully introducing us to an impressively groovy bass guitar, and features a duet between Jourgensen and one Shay Jones, who’s also credited as a co-writer on the song--the only writing credit on the album besides Jourgensen. While Jones would later release some house singles under her own name, she seems to have been a session musician at this point in her career, but does an astounding job for a hired gun. The instrumental of “I Wanted To Tell Her” is almost identical to a bonus track from the “I’m Falling” single called “Primental,” albeit with a bit more studio polish--but that extra bit of professionalism, and its superbly bitter and bitchy duet, push it over the top for me. That’s all for today--thanks for listening!
Music: “I Wanted To Tell Her”
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thelastmixedtape · 2 days ago
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Review | "the spirit of sonic poetry" Senu - Jetlag
Review | "the spirit of sonic poetry" Read TLMT's take on Senu's 'Jetlag' @AmplifyAgencyIE
Senu brings the spirit of sonic poetry to his music. Emulating artists like Spike Lee and Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jetlag draws its influence and sound from the sprawling megalopolis of New York, a city that never sleeps, via restless music filled with the need to live every moment.  Much like Basquiat, Senu contorts his beats into abstractions of places and figures, and like Lee, casts the correct…
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nethudara · 2 days ago
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The Flying Burrito Brothers - The Gilded Palace of Sin Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3w2zl98
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nethudara · 3 days ago
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Alex Chilton/Hi Rhythm Section - Boogie Shoes: Live on Beale Street Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3hrdvIh
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pocritics · 3 days ago
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Jorja Smith - Be Right Back (2021)
01. Addicted - 95/100 02. Gone - 83/100 03. Bussdown - 82/100 04. Time - N/A 05. Home - 73/100 06. Burn - 69/100 07. Digging - 67/100 08. Weekend - 70/10
Nota: 77/100 Best Track: Addicted
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nethudara · 4 days ago
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Iceage - Seek Shelter Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/2SNI5Sm
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nethudara · 4 days ago
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dodie - Build a Problem Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/3hwFPZM
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nethudara · 4 days ago
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Snow Ellet - Suburban Indie Rock Star EP Music Album Reviews https://ift.tt/2SDvVv5
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johnjpuccio · 5 days ago
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Stretching the Symphony
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At least for me, the symphony is the pinnacle of orchestral music. Yes, there are wonderful tone poems, overtures, ballets, concertos, incidental music, and such, but by golly, the symphony is where it’s at. Although symphonies come in many shapes and sizes, most classical music fans tend to think of the typical symphony as having four movements: an opening movement set in sonata form; a brief, often lighthearted scherzo; a slow movement, more serious, reflective, perhaps even somber; and then a finale that ramps up the energy level and often builds to some sort of rousing finish. Throughout the piece, the listener feels as if she is being led along some more or less clearly defined tonal path, with perhaps some twist and turns but never a sense of being lost. The musical journey is comfortable, largely because it is so familiar. Four movements, clearly defined format, familiar sounds…
To read the full review, click here:
https://classicalcandor.blogspot.com/2021/05/stretching-symphony-cd-reviews.html
Karl W. Nehring, Classical Candor
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