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#Judaism
oftheredmoon · 6 hours ago
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He exposed them what are the zionists gonna say now LMAAOOO
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hi with all the stuff going on with israel and palestine i just want to remind you guys that being jewish doesn’t equal Israeli. the majority of jews don’t support the IDF and claiming that they do is anti semitic.
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vijay187guddi · 7 hours ago
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#anxiety #emotion #anger #stress #feelings #healing #depression #depressionhelp #coping #trauma #mentalhealthtips #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #heartbroken #relationshipquotes #lonely #hurt #breakthestigma #dark #sad #suicide #soulhealing #naturalhealing #healthylife  #love #life #SaintRampalJi #KabirIsGod #SantRampalJiMaharaj
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vijay187guddi · 7 hours ago
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#anxiety #emotion #anger #stress #feelings #healing #depression #depressionhelp #coping #trauma #mentalhealthtips #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #heartbroken #relationshipquotes #lonely #hurt #breakthestigma #dark #sad #suicide #soulhealing #naturalhealing #healthylife  #love #life #SaintRampalJi #KabirIsGod #SantRampalJiMaharaj
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didyoumeanxianity · 7 hours ago
Are there any books you would recommend on the history of Reform Judaism?
Absolutely! There are a number of options, but my number one recommendation would be Dr. Michael Meyers’ Response to Modernity: A History of the Reform Movement in Judaism.
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gwydionmisha · 9 hours ago
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fuckyeahreligionpigeon · 12 hours ago
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Back in the day, I was a pastor at the largest church in North America. Eventually I walked away from it all because I could not teach beliefs and doctrines that I myself no longer accepted. No person taught evangelical theology with the devotion and passion that I did, but one day I realized this did not produce true and lasting change in others lives or my own. 
Looking back, I can see I made at least these mistakes as a megachurch pastor:
Putting church over community
Putting orthodoxy over love.
Putting certainty over wonder.
Putting teaching over conversation.
Putting polished over real.
Putting explanations over empathy.
Putting answers over questions.
Putting membership over friendship.
Putting prayer over action.
Putting services over self-care.
Putting style over substance.
Putting appearance over authenticity.
Putting functionality over beauty.
Putting religion over spirituality.
Putting numbers over faces.
Putting holiness over humanity.
Putting accountability over acceptance.
Putting heaven over earth.
Putting meetings over relationships.
Putting reputation over risk.
Putting superiority over humility.
Putting charisma over compassion.
Putting the afterlife over the herelife.
Putting doctrine over reason.
Putting hierarchy over equality.- Jim Palmer
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oftheredmoon · 12 hours ago
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Judaism ≠ Zionism!! Our cousins stand with us🇵🇸
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boychik-art · 13 hours ago
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socialistsephardi · 14 hours ago
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The Political History of Zionism
With everything currently going on, I’ve decided to make this post detailing the different streams of Zionism, in order to deconstruct rhetoric surrounding Zionism. I do this to aid arguments against Hasbara, which often claims that Zionism is unified and simple.
To begin, Political Zionism is generally considered to start with the writings of Theodor Herzl, in the 19th century political climate of Central and Eastern Europe. Prior to this, numerous pre-zionist movements were competing among the Jews of europe following an event called the Haskalah, or “Jewish Enlightment”. The French Revolution caused France to become the first european nation to recognize Jews as citizens with rights, which would be followed by Britain and Germany. This allowed for the formation of a new secular Jewish middle class enthrawled by enlightment principles - mainly, rationalism, romanticism, and nationalism. However, this also generated a shift from religious persecution towards ‘racial’ antisemitism. As the Jews of various countries were subjected to either intense expectations of assimilation, or reoccuring waves of pogroms, it became clear that most of europe regarded these emancipated Jews as foreign nationals of alien religion and culturally compatible. The proto-Zionists begin building a consensus pushing for immigration to Ottoman Palestine, some seeking to provide an alternative to the pogroms, some believing themselves witness to the signs of an imment messiah, etc. Moshe Hess, an associate of Karl Marx, calls for Jews to create a socialist state in Palestine (more on Hess later). Waves of European Jews arrive, and organizations aiming to support Jewish farmers and artisans in Palestine and Syria are founded. The local authorities begin to differentiate between the immigrant Jews and the Jews from the local communities. Herzl enters the Jewish public consciousness with his writings calling specifically for the creation of a Jewish majority state. appealing to the British and French empires to aid them. He rejects Hess’s socialist proposal and instead proposes a reconstruction of Jewry altogether, rejecting the diaspora entirely, arguing that only separation could ensure Jewish survival. Herzl proposes establishing this state in Argentina, but concludes that Palestine would likely have more ideological appeal. I feel it crucial to note here that in his early writings, Herzl is hostile to religious Jews, claims that the Jews of the Ghettos and Shtetls hold back the intellectual, and calls the Sephardi Jews living under France in Algeria mixed blood barbarians. These attitudes would carry over into the political zietgiest of early Zionism.
From here, Zionism begins to grow, the call for simple immigration to the land is supplanted by a demand for a Jewish majority state, and competing schools of thought emerge. The World Zionist Organization is created, and the Zionists pivot attempt including the consent of the Ottomans in the project. Herzl here also begins to explicitly call for the colonization of Palestine, in line with his admiration for the french and british empires. The first major split within the Zionist movement comes with the formation of Labor Zionism based on Hess’s writings. Wheras Herzl’s camp depended on gaining support from the empires and from prominent Jewish figures, Labor Zionism argued that only the Jewish working class could create such a nation, and sought to emphasize a progressive Jewish identity. This is also where a re-alignment for the religious backing begins. Originally, orthodox Jews are in an uneasy alliance with the entirely secular Jews in the movement, mostly because despite his early writings, Herzl emphasized a need to manufacture support from orthodox rabbis and communities. With Herzl eventual death, the orthodox separate from the mainstream movement, citing the believe that only the Messiah can reassert Jewish control over the land. Reform Jews at this time also reject Zionism, as it is perceived as a threat to Jewish citizenship in Europe and America. The Reform rejected the notion that Jews were bound by a shared nationality, a position which held true until the holocaust.
Over the next few decades, various zionist groups in palestine compete for power. Many begin attacking the Muslim and Christian Palestinian communities, often forcibly separating the local Jewry in the process. Jewish terrorist groups launch attacks on British centers following WW1. Labor Zionists rejected traditional Jewish practice, arguing that these represented a diaspora mentality. They also set up the early Kibbitzim. Jabotinsky develops a trend known as Revisionist Zionism, with the aim of territorial maximalism. Revisionist Zionism becomes ingrained as the right wing faction, and eventually becoming the ideological foundation of the current Likud party. Jabotinsky admired and borrowed core concepts from Mussolini and fascism, in particular the centrality of the state, social conservative unity, and racial supremacy. Mussolini knew of this and told the founder of the World Jewish Congress “For Zionism to succeed, you need to have a Jewish State with a Jewish flag, and Jewish language. The person who understands that is your fascist, Jabotinsky". The revisionists during this time approved of the idea of building a Mediterranean alliance and opposing British influence. In 1939, Stern forms Lehi, and they oppose Britain in WW2, instead arguing that Jews must align with the Axis, eventually going so far as to claim that if they were to take control of the mandate, they would negotiate with Hitler to see the Jews in the camps transfered in as new citizens, and in exchange join the German sphere.
Following WW2, the Nakba occurs, and the Haganah (including groups like Lehi) is reorganized into the IDF. The liberal/general Zionists are now faced with oppozing interal forces such as the labor Zionists and the revisionists. They now turn to emphasis liberalism in the new state, mostly the democratic electoral system and the free market, but largely become a backdrop to the rest of the political movements, which turn themselves into party affiliation, since the basic liberal structure had already been established. The labor Zionists become the dominant trend in Israeli politics until the 70′s. Following the Six Day Way in 67, Israel seizes control of the rest of the land from the mandate. This sets off a new movement. Previously, Religious Zionism was a minor stream mostly simply meaning religious Jews who supported Zionism. From here on, however, it becomes dominated by a right wing religious trend and becomes NeoZionism. NeoZionists combined religious and nationalist elements, specifically advocated settlements beyond the green line, and often advocate the removal of Arab people, citing Arab Israelis as a potential 5th column. Neozionists believe that the secularism of other zionist branches is a significant weak point, and usually incorporate far right orthodox talking points. Groups such as the Hebron settlers are highly influenced by Neozionism. Neozionists are also usually behind the call to establish an entirely orthodox state in the west bank if Israel were to pull out. On the opposite end, there are the post-Zionists, who believe Zionism has fulfilled its goal. Post-Zionists are not really coordiated in the same way others on this list are, but generally they are critical of the direction israel has moved, they typically seek to try to make Jews safer in the diaspora, generally support Arab Israelis and some post-zionists believe in transforming the state into an entirely liberal-democratic one. Right wing Israelis also use “post zionist“ to refer to the Israeli left after the Oslo Accords in the mid 90′s.
Finally, I’d like to take note of Kahanism. Kahanism is an extremist ideology based on the work of Rabbi Meir Kahane, and materialized as the Kach party in Israel, a party which was boycotted by every other faction the single time they were elected to the Knesset, and is now banned and labeled a terrorist organization. Kahanists believe that every single Jew should live in Israel, and that only Jews should live in Israel. They advocate for Israel to enforce traditional Jewish law at the national scale, and together with Neozionists have engaged in actions to provoke fear in diaspora communities. Kahanists believe that all Arab people are the mortal enemy of all Jews and that Israel should seize land from Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Egypt. Kahane himself proposed laws, including banning intermarriage, banning cultural meetings between Jewish and Muslim students, and re-segregating areas that had already undergone desegregation.
So that is a compressed history of the trends within Zionism. I write this not to garner sympathy for Zionism, but in hopes that this helps pick apart hasbarist simplification. At best, Zionism produced a labor movement with a terribly racist history which stole yemenite Jewish children and encouraged discrimination and segregation against sephardi and mizrachi Jews within Israel from a secular ashkenazi ‘core‘. At worst, fundamentalists and militant zealots who are overwhelmingly hostile to anyone else, groups who align with historic and current fascist and nazi movements, and a massive, overwhelming history of abuse and human rights violations against Palestinians, other Arabs, Jews of color, diaspora movements, etc. If you needed any reason beyond the sheer weight of the Palestinian cause to oppose Zionism, here you go. I hope this sways the mind of any lingering ZIonists reading this, and I hope this is used to more effectively call out Zionism for what it is - a racist, imperialist, and fascist ideology hellbent on redefining Judaism for its aims against any act of solidarity between groups, completely fueled by western interests in carving up and controlling West Asia / the middle east/ Al-Mashriq.
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yidquotes · 14 hours ago
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Share your bread with the hungry, and take the wretched poor into your home; when you see the naked, clothe him and do not ignore your own kin.
Isaiah 58:7
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didyoumeanxianity · 14 hours ago
hello friend! so, i’ll spare you my life story, but recently i’ve been looking into converting to judaism. i really hadn’t started any learning yet because i wanted to talk with my parents first about it. when i brought it up with them it was revealed to me that my mother converted long before i was born, making me a matrilineal jew.
obviously i don’t want to just begin jumping blindly into judaism, but i’m feeling pretty lost now as most resources for people to learn about judaism in the way that i need it is for prospective converts, with the goal of going to a mikveh and living a jewish life.
any advice for me or someone in a similar situation? in your opinion, is it appropriate for me to call myself jewish now, or should i wait until i have learned more and maybe even talk to a rabbi? thank you so much! <3
Hi friend! I hope you’re having a wonderful day.
So, first, it is hardly my place to be the arbiter of who can call themself Jewish when it comes to complicated matters like assimilation and apostasy (which is what Judaism considers a Jewish person converting to Christianity). Halachically, in every denomination of Judaism other than Karaite Judaism and Reform Judaism, you are Jewish. (The Karaites, and Karaite Jews correct me if I’m wrong here, are patrilineal. Reform Judaism is neither patrilineal or matrilineal, but considers someone with one Jewish parent to be Jewish only if they were raised exclusively as a Jew.)
In terms of how to learn more, you’re absolutely on the right track, even if you feel lost. Learning an entirely new religion (even if it is your own) can feel daunting and overwhelming. Yes, absolutely, when you feel ready to do so reach out to a rabbi. In the meanwhile, there are a lot of resources out there to learn about Judaism. There’s My Jewish Learning, the Jewish Virtual Library, Chabad.org (though bear in mind it’s perspective is very much Chabad’s specific perspective, even as it contains a lot of knowledge), and a bunch of books all of which can provide introductory information about Judaism.
And, of course, you can always reach out to your local Jewish community. Things are slowly starting to move back to being in person, but there’s also events and services online. If you need help finding stuff local to you, let me know and I’ll be happy to help. You can also take advantage of the many Jewish folks who have made themselves open to questions on social media. Jumblr, Jwitter/Jtwitter, and Jewbook can seem chaotic and full of intra-Jewish disputes but they also contain a wealth of information. @progressivejudaism is a newly-minted Rabbi who has a wealth of information and hosts learning sessions, @tzipporahssong is a Jew by choice and rebbetzin-in-waiting who is also a font of information and knowledge, and there are many others.
It can seem like a lot, but the Jewish community will have your back and I hope that this part of your journey brings you joy and happiness.
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politishaun · 15 hours ago
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At least two Israelis were killed and another 160 people were wounded Sunday night when a grandstand bleacher collapsed in an ultra-Orthodox synagogue in the West Bank, marking the second large-scale tragedy in as many months, resurfacing questions around fatal negligence among the unofficially autonomous community.
More than 600 ultra-Orthodox worshipers had packed into the synagogue — which television footage showed had exposed concrete, rebar, wooden panels and other signs of infrastructure weaknesses — in the West Bank settlement of Givat Zeev. Sunday’s prayers started the Jewish holiday of Shavuot, a spring harvest festival that also recalls the story of receiving the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai.
The dead included a 12-year-old boy and a 40-year-old man, according to emergency rescue services. At least 167 were injured, including five in serious condition and 10 in moderate condition, according to the Magen David Adom emergency rescue services.
Local officials said that specific instructions had been given last week prohibiting Shavuot prayers in the building. It did not have an occupancy permit, according to official documents reported in Israeli media, which later said that neither the local police nor the local council enforced the closure on the synagogue.
The incident echoed a catastrophe that similarly raised questions of official negligence and bureaucratic chaos last month, when at Mount Meron in northern Israel 45 ultra-Orthodox Jewish worshipers, including many children and teenagers, were killed in a stampede at a pilgrimage site that was overcrowded with visitors for the Jewish holiday of Lag B’Omer. It was the largest loss of civilian life in the country’s history.
The Mount Meron event came after warnings from officials over the course of a decade that the site did not have the capacity to accommodate the tens of thousands of visitors it received each year. Officials allowed the mass event to go forward, despite the coronavirus restrictions that were still in place in all other parts of the country.
“We were called again to another event where there was negligence and a lack of responsibility,” Jerusalem district police chief Doron Turgeman told reporters on Sunday night. “There will be arrests.”
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supercantaloupe · 15 hours ago
do you mind explaining some of the jewish!kristen stuff youve seen people talk about? i am jewish and Interested in what people have to say as during my watches i never read it like that but am totally willing to be convinced. if people were discussing it im either not following the right people or totally missed it. if you know of a good post you can point me to thats awesome too!! :))
i think a lot of what resonates with myself and other jewish viewers about kristen's religious arc is the fact that her journey is one that is entirely based around questioning things. questioning why the world is the way it is, what a deity should be or is, what does it mean to be a good or holy person. kristen in season 1 escapes what is very obviously a christian (evangelical)-coded cult, but personally i think what sets that apart from other cult survivor narratives and makes it more of a jewish convert narrative is that she never loses faith entirely. kristen never wants to stop beliving altogether, she just struggles to find exactly what to believe in, what resonates with her. she questions what to believe in, and she searches, and she studies, and she decides for herself what's right and good and actively rejects other deities to follow what she stands for.
the culture of questioning what is good/right/just/holy is deeply rooted and often encouraged in judaism, in my experience. i mean, we have an entire talmud and then some of rabbis and scholars arguing with each other over what every single line of scripture really means, and then some. i'm not a jewish convert, but i've read/listened to accounts from converts online who often say that they felt called to judaism in some way and then spend months and years studying and learning and working towards their official conversion.
kristen's journey in season 2 specifically being her following her doubts and questions until she finds what resonates with her personally (in her case, cassandra) calls to mind a lot of what i see in real-world judaism. the work she puts into sorting out what she believes in, standing against opponents, and working hard to reach her goal read as a conversion narrative to me. (hell, she even 'defeats' the big bad of season 2 through an act of lovingkindness!) obviously it's not a one-to-one comparison, since it's a fictitious and comedic actual play show, but that multiple jewish viewers have identified with kristen and her religious journey, i think it's a very valid and cool reading to view her as a fantasy jewish convert.
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princesssarisa · 15 hours ago
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My annual batch of sour cherry-cheesecake brownies for Shavuot.
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yoair · 16 hours ago
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The Cultural Significance and Meaning of Angels through Art and History
The Cultural Significance and Meaning of Angels through Art and History
For a long period of time Angels have been playing a significant role in our day-to-day life. Their history has journeyed through centuries of modifications of art and graphics. And hence they have granted crucial identities that often outdo their functional relationship to the sacred or holy and their performative relations to the profane world. We have known the concept of angels through Sunday…
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vijay187guddi · 17 hours ago
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#anxiety #emotion #anger #stress #feelings #healing #depression #depressionhelp #coping #trauma #mentalhealthtips #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #heartbroken #relationshipquotes #lonely #hurt #breakthestigma #dark #sad #suicide #soulhealing #naturalhealing #healthylife  #love #life #SaintRampalJi #KabirIsGod #SantRampalJiMaharaj
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