Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#David Hopen
quo-usque-tandem · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
The Orchard by David Hopen
1 note · View note
forasecondtherewedwon · 3 months ago
Quote
Being this close to her, feeling the weight of her body against mine, gave me a sense of physical pain in my chest. I imagined my years of loneliness as a long corridor, one door after another, a passage of empty chambers leading me to this night.
The Orchard by David Hopen
1 note · View note
forasecondtherewedwon · 3 months ago
Quote
For weeks I'd been shouting her name in my head. In the safety of my interior life, her name conjured intimate worlds. It provided a warmth, it induced euphoric helplessness. Her very name was an object of abstraction to which I tethered fever dreams I dared not pursue.
The Orchard by David Hopen
0 notes
forasecondtherewedwon · 3 months ago
Quote
'Majestic sadness,' she told me. 'That's tragedy.'
The Orchard by David Hopen
5 notes · View notes
bookbabe92 · 3 months ago
Quote
What if we are the ones who dictate meaning for our own lives.
The Orchard by David Hopen
0 notes
bookbabe92 · 4 months ago
Quote
The thought of being freed from the unremitting monotony of my current existence gave me an exhilarating sense of escape.
The Orchard by David Hopen
0 notes
bookbabe92 · 4 months ago
Quote
We stand in emptied houses to learn we've never made a mark.
The Orchard by David Hopen
1 note · View note
lesserjoke · 4 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Book #32 of 2021:
The Orchard by David Hopen
This novel’s all-Jewish cast helps disguise the familiarity of its tropes, but it’s ultimately a pretty conventional coming-of-age plot, one part Mean Girls (sheltered new kid falls in with the school’s popular crowd of bad influences) and one part The Secret History (scholarly discussion group chases after esoteric philosophy to increasingly disastrous ends — although here’s where I should confess that I haven’t read that classic Donna Tartt title yet, so I may have the summary a bit wrong.) Author David Hopen paints a hyper-realistic portrait, both in the thorough #ownvoices Jewishness of the text and in the dimensions of his teenage subjects, who generally feel like actual youths compared to the stylized heroes who populate much of the YA market. When the protagonist is called out for forming an idealized image of his romantic interest and ignoring her human flaws, the moment is all the more powerful for how seductively recognizable his thinking has been. I remember being that boy, and I’ve rarely seen the mentality conveyed so exactly or critiqued so cuttingly in fiction.
And yet… For all of these strengths, I don’t know that I can honestly say I’ve enjoyed the reading experience as a whole. The students may be lifelike, but they’re also fairly insufferable, and although the writer seems aware of that, it’s hard to root for them to do anything but improve as people, which, without getting into spoilers, is not quite how the narrative trends. There’s a non-consensual drug trip that introduces a potential supernatural element into the mix as well, and I think the issue would have been better off resolved one way or the other, rather than remaining ambiguous throughout.
Do I love the fact that the frum Jew faces temptation from peers who are more secular but still clearly members of the same faith with some common touchstones and values of the sacred? Of course. And I really appreciate how rooted the book is in its Judaism overall; I don’t believe an outside audience would be lost, but I hadn’t realized how refreshing it could be for a story featuring my religion to dispose of the explanatory comma spelling out each and every offhand remark. This is a tale that trusts you to already understand about Purim and davening and plenty beyond, or at least be willing to look such items up on your own time. That is truly a rare gift; I only wish I could bring myself to care more for the petty figures at the heart of it.
★★★☆☆
–Subscribe at https://patreon.com/lesserjoke to support these reviews and weigh in on what I read next!–
Find me on Patreon | Goodreads | Blog | Twitter
4 notes · View notes
bigtickhk · 6 months ago
Link
The Orchard by David Hopen https://amzn.to/3362Zy9
0 notes
negruj · 2 days ago
Text
Engeland - Kroatië : 1-0
Winst voor Engeland in hun openingsmatch. Dat blijkt de eerste maal te zijn. Hoewel ze nooit eerder een openingsmatch op het EK wonnen, kozen toch veel spelers voor winst voor de Engelsen.
Matchpronostiek
Lien E, Steven M, David L, Jens B, Gert P, Sander V, Seppe V, Jente G, Kim G, Bart C, Bram P, Charlotte F, Gert G, Hans B, Michiel P, Pieter-Jan G, Sofie S, Tom V, Yves V, Thomas E, Lars V, Paul E,  Tom B, Jarno F, Maurice C, Toon S zagen de Engelsen met de volle buit gaan lopen en halen 1 punt binnen.
Dave H. en Tim H. doen nog beter met een exact voorspelde uitslag en dus 3 punten.
Goaltjeskeeper
Kroatië werd niet geselecteerd als goaltjeskeeper en dus slikt niemand het tegendoelpunt.
Stijn N. koos dan weer - als enige - voor Engeland en beleeft dus een rustige eerste speeldagen. Geen tegendoelpunten.
Goaltjesdief
Met Jadon Sancho en Harry Kane kwamen twee topschutters mogelijk in actie. Helaas voor Christoph C. was er geen plaats in de Engelse selectie voor Sancho.
Harry Kane daarentegen speelde wel. Alex V., Bram V., Dave H., Gert G., Guy M., Michael T., Paul E., Tim H., Tom B., Toon S., Yves V. hopen op doelpunten van hun topschutter maar vandaag was dat nog niet het geval.
Goaltjesmatch
An G., Filip V., Yves V. selecteerden Engeland - Kroatië als hun goaltjesmatch. Helaas maar 1 doelpunt en dus 2 punten winst voor het gemaakte doelpunt.
Tussenstand
An G. doet een uitstekende zaak en neemt dankzij de goaltjesmatch alleen de leiding. Ze wordt op de voet gevolgd door Lien E. en Steven M. die met winst voor Engeland Guy M. achterlaten.
Tim H. stijgt sterk van 18 naar 7, Jente G. klopt dan weer op de deur van de top 10.
Dave H. en Yves V. maken mooie sprongen in de buik van het klassement.
Onderaan draagt Filip V. de rode lantaarn over aan Joris D.
Klik hier om de tussenstand in groter formaat te bekijken
Tumblr media
0 notes
femieuze · 2 days ago
Text
Catalogus stukje en hoofdgedachte van het werk
“Maar waar leven we vanaf januari naartoe?” las ik in een opiniestuk. Het ging over de tweede lockdown in december 2020, en dat het kabinet de hele coronacrisis verkeerd aanpakte. Besluitvorming ging niet snel genoeg. Of juist te snel. Ik weet niet meer welke van de twee het was. Alle pittige opiniestukken over de coronacrisis vloeien zo langzamerhand een beetje in elkaar over.  
Iets wat voor mij ook in elkaar aan het overvloeien is, is tijd. De hele pandemie heb ik al het gevoel alsof ik in een wachtkamer zit, zonder er echt te zitten. Dit gevoel bereikte voor mij een hoogtepunt toen ik zelf corona kreeg, en mezelf twee weken in mijn eigen huis moest opsluiten. Wanneer je niks anders kan doen dan in bed liggen en hopen dat je er weer snel bovenop komt, gebeurt er iets geks. Terwijl je naar je plafond aan het staren bent, rekt tijd zich uit als een elastiek, en knalt weer terug op zijn plek.  
Maar waar gaan we vanaf januari naartoe leven? En waar leven we daarna naartoe? En wat doen we met de tijd ertussen?
---------------------
De hoofdgedachte van het werk is de beleving van tijd EN de beleving van ruimtes tijdens een pandemie. Een pandemie is niet een collectieve vijand die we echt kunnen zien en aan kunnen wijzen, dus er is ook niks waar je tegen zou kunnen “vechten”. Wanneer er een crisis gaande is, willen mensen vaak juist in actie komen. Iets doen om het aanbreken van een tijd zonder crisis te versnellen. Het verzetten tegen een pandemie is passief. Binnen blijven. Geen mensen ontmoeten. Afwachten. 
Het meemaken van een nieuwe, beangstigende tijd in de ruimtes waar je bekend mee bent zorgt voor een andere beleving van deze tijd, en daarmee ook de ruimtes.
De inspiraties voor mijn werk waren vooral de werken van Maria Lassnig en David Hockney, de afstudeerscriptie over lichaamsbeleving “Een Gele Bikini” van Iza Tromp (https://www.mistermotley.nl/sites/default/files/Een%20gele%20bikini%20-%20Iza%20Tromp.pdf) , nieuwe gewoontes die ik bij mezelf en anderen zag ontwikkelen tijdens de pandemie, en https://vimeo.com/blog/post/staff-pick-premiere-the-bigger-picture/ dit werk tot op zekere hoogte.
0 notes
booksociety · 3 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
As you may have noticed, at the beginning of this year the Book Society network took a small break. We are now slowly coming back starting with our first event of 2021! Before introducing it, we would like to inform you about a few minor changes to the layout our events. Firstly, there will no longer be a book of the month, but of course that you're still more than welcome to buddy-read any book you choose. Secondly, our events will now be running for two months instead of just one. We hope that this will allow more people to participate and finish their books, especially during busier times of the year. Thank you for your understanding and for your kind support!
And now, without further ado we present our March and April reading event! This time, the members have chosen Author Debuts as our theme. Come and join us by reading the first-ever book published by any author of your choice. This event is open to everyone, not just our members.
✧ how to participate:
optional: reblog this post; check out our network and members
read (or reread) a book of your choice that fits this month’s theme
share what book you’ve chosen, thoughts, reactions, and/or creations
use the tag #booksocietynet in your posts, and include “@booksociety ’s Author Debuts Event: [insert book title here]” in the description of your creations
the event starts on March 15 and ends on April 31
✧ reading recommendations (under the cut):
An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson (young adult, fantasy, romance; 300 pages; tw: violence, death)
A Song of Wraiths and Ruin (A Song of Wraiths and Ruin #1) by Roseanne A. Brown (young adult, fantasy, romance; 480 pages; tw: anxiety attacks, death, animal death, discrimination)
A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum (adult, literary fiction; 339 pages; tw: domestic abuse, misogyny)
Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin (adult, contemporary, romance, retellings; 351 pages; tw: islamophobia, racism, death of a parent, alcoholism)
Blood Heir (Blood Heir Trilogy #1) by Amélie Wen Zhao (young adult, fantasy, retelling; 464 pages; tw: violence, death, blood/gore, mentions of off-page emotional manipulation, indentured labour)
Bringing Down the Duke (A League of Extraordinary Women #1) by Evie Dunmore (adult, historical romance; 345 pages; tw: misogyny, miscarriage)
Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas (young adult, fantasy, lgbt+; 352 pages; tw: transphobia, blood, death, racism)
Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer (young adult, fantasy, scifi, retelling; 400 pages; tw: abuse, terminal illness, death, ableism)
Crazy Rich Asians (Crazy Rich Asians #1) by Kevin Kwan (adult, contemporary, romance; 403 pages; tw: animal cruelty)
Crier's War (Crier's War #1) by Nina Varela (young adult, fantasy, lgbt+; 464 pages; tw: death, violence, grief, mental illness)
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon (young adult, contemporary, romance; 306 pages; tw: chronic illness, confinement, death)
Forever, Interrupted by Taylor Jenkins Reid (adult, romance, contemporary; 321 pages; tw: death, grief, car accident)
Graceling (The Graceling Realm #1) by Kristin Cashore (young adult, fantasy; 471 pages; tw: death, gore, violence)
Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers (adult, romance, contemporary, lgbt+; 352 pages; tw: self harm, mental illness, panick attacks, racism, homophobia)
How Much of These Hills is Gold by C. Pam Zhang (adult, historical fiction, lgbt+; 288 pages; tw: transphobia, racism)
Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha #1) by Tomi Adeyemi (young adult, fantasy; 544 pages; tw: death, violence, torture, blood, genocide, colourism)
Legendborn (Legendborn #1) by Tracy Deonn (young adult, fantasy, lgbt+, retelling; 501 pages; tw: loss of a parent, grief, mentions of slavery, generational trauma)
More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera (young adult, contemporary, lgbt+; 293 pages; tw: homophobia, suicide, death, self harm)
Red Rising (Red Rising Saga #1) by Pierce Brown (adult, sci-fi, dystopia; 382 pages; tw: colourism, gore, violence, death, slavery, body horror)
Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston (new adult, romance, contemporary, lgbt+; 421 pages; tw: homophobia, drug use mention, panic attacks)
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (classics, historical fiction, romance; 409 pages; tw: grief, misogyny)
Serpent & Dove (Serpent & Dove #1) by Shelby Mahurin (young/new adult, fantasy, romance; 513 pages; tw: death, religious bigotry, misogyny, physical abuse, violence)
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda (Creekwood #1) by Becky Albertalli (young adult, romance, contemporary, lgbt+; 303 pages; tw: forced outing, homophobia, bullying)
Solitaire (Solitaire #1) by Alice Oseman (young adult, romance, contemporary, lgbt+; 392 pages; tw: mental illness, suicidal thoughts, self harm, suicide attempt, eating disorder, homophobia)
Starstruck (Starstruck #1) by S.E. Anderson (sci-fi, new adult; 495 pages)
Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid (adult, contemporary; 310 pages; tw: racism, police brutality, body shaming)
The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton (adult, mystery, thriller; 342 pages; tw: fat shaming, violence, death, suicide, murder)
The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan (young adult, fabulism, mental health; 480 pages; tw: suicide, death of a parent, grief, mental illness)
The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy #1) by S.A. Chakraborty (adult, fantasy; 533 pages; tw: violence, blood, gore, slavery, xenophobia)
The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo (adult, historical fiction, paranromal, romance; 390 pages; tw: death, death of a parent, addiction, misogyny)
The Gilded Ones (Deathless #1) by Namina Forna (young adult, fantasy; 432 pages; tw: violence, torture, death, misogyny, abuse, body horror, confinement)
The Golem and the Jinni (The Golem and the Jinni #1) by Helene Wecker (adult, historical, fantasy; 486 pages; tw: violence, rape)
The Hate U Give (The Hate U Give #1) by Angie Thomas (young adult, contemporary; 444 pages; tw: police brutality, racism, death, violence, addiction)
The Hating Game by Sally Thorne (adult, contemporary, romance; 387 pages; tw: body shaming)
The Henna Wars by Adiba Jaigirdar (young adult, contemporary, romance, lgbt+; 400 pages; tw: homophobia, lesbophobia, racism, bullying)
The Kiss Quotient (The Kiss Quotient #1) by Helen Hoang (adult, contemporary, romance; 323 pages; tw: ableism, cancer, sexual assault, sexism)
The Lies of Locke Lamora (Gentleman Bastard #1) by Scott Lynch (adult, fantasy; 499 pages; tw: violence, death)
The Near Witch (The Near Witch #1) by V.E. Schwab (young adult, fantasy, romance; 354 pages; tw: self harm, kidnapping, animal death, abuse, death of a parent)
The Orchard by David Hopen (adult, dark academia; 480 pages; tw: death, addiction, grief, animal cruelty)
The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo (young adult, poetry, contemporary; 368 pages; tw: emotional abuse, child abuse, misogyny, body shaming)
The Poppy War (The Poppy War #1) by R. F. Kuang (adult, historical & high fantasy; 531 pages; tw: death, gore, violence, colourism)
The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller (adult, mythology, romance, lgbt+; 352 pages; tw: death, violence, grief, blood, rape, gore)
The Star-Touched Queen (The Star-Touched Queen #1) by Roshani Chokshi (young adult, fantasy, romance; 342 pages)
The Trouble with Hating You by Sajni Patel (adult, romance, contemporary; 336 pages; tw: emotional abuse, sexual assault, child abuse, death, grief)
These Violent Delights (These Violent Delights #1) by Chloe Gong (young adult, historical, retellings; 449 pages; tw: violence, blood, gore, death, body horror, self harm)
We Hunt the Flame (Sands of Arawiya #1) by Hafsah Faizal (young adult, fantasy, romance; 472 pages; tw: death, torture, emotional abuse, child abuse, misogyny)
Where Dreams Descend (Kingdom of Cards #1) by Janella Angeles (young adult, fantasy, romance; 464 pages; tw: misogyny, toxic relationship, violence)
Wings of Ebony (Wings of Ebony #1) by J. Elle (young adult, fantasy, scifi; 368 pages; tw: racism, violence, death of a parent, grief, addiction)
Woven in Moonlight by Isabel Ibañez (young adult, magical realism, 384 pages; tw: violence, gore, death, torture)
You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson (young adult, contemporary, romance, lgbt+; 336 pages; tw: homophobia, panick attacks, racism, chronic illness, bullying)
40 notes · View notes
bookbabe92 · 3 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Reading Goal Checkpoint:
My goal for 2021 was to read at least 10 books a month. As you can see for January I did REALLY well and read 16! However, I really fell down on the job for February, it doesn’t help too that it is the shortest month. 
However, I am still pretty happy with what I did manage to read! The Orchard by David Hopen was REALLY good but there contained a lot of deep philosophical ramblings and theories so that was a bit hard to wade through since I haven’t studied or read much philosophy since college. 
I finished the Giant Days series by John Allison which I am happy and sad about. I LOVED it so much! I never got to go away to college so I really enjoyed the antics of the three main characters. I wish there were more after they had left college but I understand that it was a logical place to end the series and I thought the ending was really good. 
Anyways, I have a large stack of books ready for me for March! And more on order at the library... but we won’t talk about that! What are you guys looking forward to reading in March? Is there something you have had lying around forever that you are going to dive into? Or something brand new coming out that you can’t contain your excitement about? Let me know! 
0 notes
chrisvoss · 4 months ago
Text
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Orchard: A Novel by David Hopen
0 notes
stevedavismarketing · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
ICYMI: The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Orchard: A Novel Kindle Edition by David Hopen http://dlvr.it/RrcX4y
0 notes
levenslessen · 4 months ago
Text
Dag 153 – “Thank God it’s Christmas”
Dit verhaal hoort bij mijn werkdag van donderdag 17 december.
“Goedemorgen David, met Milou, ik vind het vreselijk om te zeggen. Maar ik moet me ziekmelden.”
Het is weer misgegaan. De middag met collega’s gister was ontzettend gaaf en ze waren zo dankbaar. Ik kreeg er zo’n kick van om ze te kunnen helpen maar het scherm heeft mij weer genekt. Het is nu de derde keer dus ik krijg wel meer vat en informatie op het hoe en het waarom.
Ik voelde het gisteravond al aankomen, eigenlijk zodra ik de laatste sessie beëindigde. Lag even plat op de bank om mijn maag en hoofd te kalmeren. Dit keer besloot ik vuur met vuur te bestrijden, dus niet toegeven maar vechten. De enveloppen van de kerstkaarten moesten geschreven worden, postzegels geplakt, laatste kerstvoorbereidingen getroffen. Het moest. Van mezelf uiteraard, want van wie anders.
Ondanks mijn verzet en het feit dat het af en toe beter ging, kreeg ik geen hap door mijn keel en lukte het halverwege de avond echt niet meer. Plat op de rug. Ogen dicht. Dat was het enige wat nog ging. Mijn maag voelde alsof de stieren van Pamplona er los gelaten werden, alleen plat op mijn rug hield ik ze nog een beetje in bedwang.
De avond werd nacht, de bank werd mijn bed. Ik kon niet draaien naar mijn zij want dan kwam de golf van misselijkheid. Aangezien ik altijd op mijn zij in slaap val, werd het een slechte nacht. Na korte momenten van slaap kon ik rond een uur of vier draaien naar mijn zij en nog proberen wat rust te pakken. Hopen op beterschap.
Als mijn wekker gaat weet ik dat het nog verre van goed is. De afgelopen keren voelde ik me the day after niet goed, maar wel goed genoeg. Nu voelde ik mijn reisziekte nog even echt. Ik noem het maar reisziekte omdat het voor mij hier nog het meeste op lijkt, of het nu komt door mijn houding, door de focus die ik mentaal of met mijn ogen moet maken, iets lijkt er mis te gaan in mijn evenwichtsorgaan. Zeeziek van Zoom. Zoom dat eigenlijk Teams was dit keer, maar dat klinkt minder leuk.
Vandaag zou ik dan eindelijk mijn eerste online lessen gaan geven, nadat ik al maanden diverse docenten vertel hoe het ‘heurt’, na mijn collega’s gister de kneepjes van het online lesgeefvak mee te geven. Kan ik het vandaag gewoon niet. De gedachte dat ik dat moet doen maakt me ziek, de gedachte dat ik die kids in de steek laat nadat ze zoveel vertrouwen in mij geuit hebben, maakt me nog zieker. Toch is er geen keuze en krijg ik terecht thuis die keuze ook niet. Dus pleeg ik deze ochtend een telefoontje wat ik zelden pleeg, mijn ziekmelding.
Tumblr media
Mijn maag is in rustiger vaarwater beland en na wat hazenslaapjes kan ik het gevoel van binnen niet meer negeren; ik plaats berichten en opdrachten op Teams voor mijn leerlingen. Materiaal waar ze mee aan de slag kunnen als ze anders vandaag van mij les hadden gehad. Ik bel zelfs in, in een vergadering. Inkomende video uit, camera uit, liggend in bed. Ik hoor iedereen die dit leest al in hun hoofd oordelen en dat snap ik, dat zou ik ook doen. Toch voel ik me een spijbelaar en weet ik dat dit nog net kan.
Ik geef op dit moment de flitsende beelden van de inkomende video’s de schuld en schakel deze uit, ik luister en praat mee. Mee met mijn ene collega die met Corona op bed ligt terwijl wij met onze andere collega’s plannen maken voor in het nieuwe jaar. Mee met de werkgroep Lockdown omdat er nog genoeg dilemma’s waren blijven liggen. En ja, dit voelde voor mij goed. Toch nog een steentje kunnen bijdragen en de stemmen van mijn collega’s kunnen horen. Anders was het niet af en echt een te abrupt einde aan deze periode.
Aan het einde van de dag ben ik niet beter, heb ik nagenoeg de hele dag in bed doorgebracht, iets wat ik zelfs als ik ziek ben zelden doe en start toch de vakantie. Thank God it’s Christmas. Wat ik op dat moment nog niet weet is dat de misselijkheid meer dan een week blijft sluimeren, nooit eerder duurde het zo lang als nu. Ik geef de vakantie maar de schuld, of toch het verzetten tegen mijn fysieke grens? Twee dingen weet ik wel, dit brengt een grote uitdaging voor 2021 met zich mee én ik mag mezelf gelukkig prijzen dat ik na de vakantie géén online les ga geven, ik weet niet of ik dat fysiek had aangekund. Ik heb net deze maand de eindexamenklassen van mijn collega overgenomen en zij krijgen gewoon op school les, wat een speling van het lot.
It’s been a long hard year, but now it’s Christmas! Op naar de vakantie, op naar het nieuwe jaar. Aan alles komt een einde, ook aan 2020, ook aan Corona, ook aan mijn Zoomziekte. Een bijzonder jaar geëindigd met een bijzondere laatste werkdag. Op naar beterschap. Thank God it’s Christmas!
Oh, my love
We've had our share of tears
Oh, my friends
We've had our hopes and fears
Oh, my friends
It's been a long hard year
But now it's Christmas
Yes, it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
The moon and stars seem awful cold and bright
Let's hope
The snow will make this Christmas right
My friend the world
Will share this special night
Because it's Christmas
Yes it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
For
One
Night
Thank God it's Christmas, yeah
Thank God it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
Can it be Christmas?
Let it be Christmas
Every day
Oh, my love
We live in troubled days
Oh, my friend
We have the strangest ways
All my friends
On this one day of days
Thank God it's Christmas
Yes, it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
For
One
Day
Thank God it's Christmas
Yes, it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
Ooh, yeah
Thank God it's Christmas
Yes, yes, yes, yes it's Christmas
Thank God it's Christmas
For
One
Day
Het liedje luisteren doe je hier: https://open.spotify.com/track/0QtJZpyfZF67QF32p41NXa?si=uTimDeg2Q6iaGUn1lzPEug
De hele afspeellijst van mijn blogs hier: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5EtxaLDydwfpnPsFrSS3Oh?si=Q38OEQ4aSDWoR42OH9Ef6A
0 notes
stevedavismarketing · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – The Orchard: A Novel Kindle Edition by David Hopen http://dlvr.it/RqvgD3
0 notes
stacyalesi · 5 months ago
Text
THE ORCHARD by David Hopen
New #bookreview: THE ORCHARD by David Hopen, an original new voice in #Jewish #literary #fiction! @eccobooks @HarperCollins #DavidHopen #literarydebut #jewishfiction #TheOrchard
CLICK TO PURCHASE From the publisher: A Recommended Book From:The New York Times * Good Morning America * Entertainment Weekly * Electric Literature * The New York Post * Alma * The Millions * Book Riot  A commanding debut and a poignant coming-of-age story about a devout Jewish high school student whose plunge into the secularized world threatens everything he knows of himself Ari Eden’s life…
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
0 notes
medusaes · 5 months ago
Text
going to keep a list of everything i read in 2021 here! just for my own reference
Monday’s Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Hunger by Roxane Gay
My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh*
They Both Die at The End by Adam Silvera
The Mothers by Brit Bennett
Death in Her Hands by Ottessa Moshfegh
Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh
A Place For Us by Fatima Farzeen Mirza*
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn*
Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia*
Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
Where The Wild Ladies Are by Aoko Matsuda
The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones*
The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett*
The Idiot by Elif Batuman
You by Caroline Kepnes
Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes
The Orchard by David Hopen
Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica
Confessions by Kanae Minato
The Upstairs House by Julia Fine
1 note · View note
reviewsbyracine · 5 months ago
Text
I READ A BOOK: “The Orchard” by David Hopen
Tumblr media
Every so often, I come across a book that I really like at its core, but which never really grabs my attention and therefore takes me forever to finish. Back in the spring, this book was The Goldfinch, an overwritten coming-of-age novel that, despite enjoying the epic scale of the story, took me forever to finish. I had a similar issue with David Hopen’s debut novel The Orchard, a fascinating yet bloated story about a young man grappling with his Jewish faith after his family moves to a new town.
The Orchard follows Aryeh “Ari” Eden, a young man from a Hasidic neighborhood in Brooklyn whose family moves to Miami after his father gets a new job. Having grown up in a deeply religious community, Ari faces a serious culture shock when he arrives in Miami: drinking, drugs, girls his own age scantily clad in bathing suits, and relaxed wearing of yarmulkes. Ari grows close to a group of classmates which include Noah, his neighbor, and Evan, a troubled friend still reeling from the loss of his mother to cancer. He also becomes attached to Sophia, Evan’s ex-girlfriend and a fellow lover of the arts. 
Like The Goldfinch, my major problem with The Orchard was that there was simply too much going on at once. Hopen could have used an editor to pare his story down by at least one hundred pages to help with pacing. There were also a large number of characters of which to keep track and Hopen loves to use dialogue, making all the voices feel jumbled together and difficult to differentiate. Although the story picked up steam towards the end, there were large portions of the novel where it really felt like Ari was just floating along waiting for something exciting to happen. Hopen clearly has great respect for Judiasm and it’s easy to believe that Ari’s questioning of his faith might have been something Hopen himself struggled with, but in the end, I felt like The Orchard was a struggle to complete. 
1 note · View note