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#Booklr
coffeemilkchai · 27 minutes ago
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006 | 19 june 2021
ft. a vanilla protein shake on ice & one of the books that i have been reading
worked out in preparation for flag football tryouts
swam in the lake while it was raining
watched two episodes of death note
read five chapters of harry potter & the half-blood prince
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haileyreadsbooks · an hour ago
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Ice Planet Barbarians
I'll pretty much read anything if I'm told to.
I started Ice Planet Barbarians on the 10th and 10 days later; I have read 26 books written in that universe. I am nearly done with the Ice Planet Barbarians series and I've made it a third of the way into the Icehome series.
I just can't stop reading them. They are funny and corny. Written pretty well, a decent plot (even if it gets redundant), and good world-building. I'm sure the sexy times are great, but I don't even need any of that. The whole idea is kind of ridiculous, which is why I started reading them.
If you are waffling on them, I say check them out. The character development gets better with each book, so if after the first one you don't like it, try another, that is literally the worst one.
Definitely check out the trigger warnings for the books, no one seems to warn that in the first book there is some pretty heavy stuff. I would say check it for each book to make sure you are comfortable because some themes come up again.
These are really short and fun reads.
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butterfly-storms · an hour ago
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My debut book of poetry and prose titled No Straight Lines is now available on Amazon, Kindle, Flipkart, Kobo, iBook and Barnes & Noble. Order your copy today!
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books-in-a-storm · 2 hours ago
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My Library
Owl And The City Of Angels, Kristi Charish
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bibliophilenikki · 3 hours ago
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Because even the bravest of us can still be afraid sometimes, so long as we don't let our fear become all we know.
- The House in the Cerulean Sea, TJ Klune
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franticvampirereads · 3 hours ago
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Okay, I fell in love with this book...so much. This was just such a hilarious take on a fantasy story. I actually laughed out loud while reading and I couldn’t get enough of it. I loved everything about this book, from all the fluffy bits, to the angsty pining, to the overly dramatic-ness, to the open queerness of it all. It’s everything that I could ever want in a fantasy book.
I loved Sam to bits, and I totally get why everyone in the book does too! He’s like the love child of Cecil Palmer from WTNV and Neil Josten from AFTG. He’s awkward, adorable, and selfless. He’s just so stinking cute, and deserves all the hugs! Now Gary. He’s such a diva and I absolutely adored him! Honestly? I loved all the characters in this story. They had such great banter and interactions.
I can’t wait to see what else this series has in store! The Lightning-Struck Heart is getting a solid five stars. It’s one of the funniest books I’ve read all year! Also! This book is definitely not for anyone under 18.
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thenightisland · 3 hours ago
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“I’d tried to cope alone for far too long, and it hadn’t done me any good at all. Sometimes you simply needed someone kind to sit with you while you dealt with things.”
-Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine
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voidstilesplease · 3 hours ago
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sometimes i'm too exhausted that i find myself pausing what i'm doing to stare into nothing and think longingly about all the books that i want to read but don't have the time to anymore. this yearning hurts
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emiliareadsbooks · 4 hours ago
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hey guys it’s been a while! am reading Vampire Academy as my beach read, reviews/thoughts? No spoiler pls (i actually don’t really care but you know)
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samandhislostshoe · 4 hours ago
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Me trying to convince myself to read even tho my eyes are LITERALLY shutting down.
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wherethelostboysmet · 4 hours ago
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Rainy day reads☕ I just started The Nature of Witches by Rachel Griffin and it's going to be a new favorite, I can just tell.
ig: wherethelostboysmet
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books-in-a-storm · 4 hours ago
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My castle overlooked the vast, forbidding swamp that I had surveyed so long it was named after my family line: The Fen of the Devourer.
“I already am,” I said, saying an inner prayer for the safe transition between worlds as the castle melted away and my head spun.
-Sympathy For The Demons, Lidiya Foxglove
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universitylibraries · 5 hours ago
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He was not like the dopes in newspapers who killed “to see what it felt like,” and never had a bloody thing to report except sometimes a sick-making, “It wasn’t as good as I expected.” If he were interviewed, he would say, “It was terrific! There’s nothing in the world like it!” (”Would you ever do it again, Mr. Bruno?”) “Well, I might,” reflectively, with caution, as an arctic explorer when asked if he will winter up north again next year might reply uncommittingly to a reporter.
Strangers on a Train, Patricia Highsmith
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mariakureads · 6 hours ago
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I last read: Dumplin' by Julie Murphy
What I wanted: a fun contemporary book showcasing friendship, family, and Dolly Parton.
What I got: A book from the first person perspective of a full figured teen with confidence, self-doubts, dreams and thoughts about everything and everyone. The MC is missing her aunt, finds herself in a position where maybe that crush could be more, and does the one thing she never thought of, participated in a beauty pageant.
What I thought: I came to this book thanks to the film adaptation so I knew to expect differences. What I didn't realize is just how far apart the two are. I loved the first POV of the book. It highlighted her inner monologue in such a way that it felt like she was talking to the reader.
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rockislandadultreads · 6 hours ago
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Historical Fiction: Thrilling Stories
The Secret Guests by Benjamin Black
As London endures nightly German bombings, Britain's secret service whisks the princesses Elizabeth and Margaret from England, seeking safety for the young royals on an old estate in Ireland. Ahead of the German Blitz during World War II, English parents from every social class sent their children to the countryside for safety, displacing more than three million young offspring. In The Secret Guests, the British royal family takes this evacuation a step further, secretly moving the princesses to the estate of the Duke of Edenmore in "neutral" Ireland. A female English secret agent, Miss Celia Nashe, and a young Irish detective, Garda Strafford, are assigned to watch over "Ellen" and "Mary" at Clonmillis Hall. But the Irish stable hand, the housemaid, the formidable housekeeper, the Duke himself, and other Irish townspeople, some of whom lost family to English gunshots during the War of Independence, go freely about their business in and around the great house. Soon suspicions about the guests' true identities percolate, a dangerous boredom sets in for the princesses, and, within and without Clonmillis acreage, passions as well as stakes rise. Benjamin Black, who has good information that the princesses were indeed in Ireland for a time during the Blitz, draws readers into a novel as fascinating as the nascent career of Miss Nashe, as tender as the homesickness of the sisters, as intriguing as Irish-English relations during WWII, and as suspenseful and ultimately action-packed as war itself.
Three Hours In Paris by Cara Black
In June of 1940, when Paris fell to the Nazis, Hitler spent a total of three hours in the City of Light—abruptly leaving, never to return. To this day, no one knows why. Kate Rees, a young American markswoman, has been recruited by British intelligence to drop into Paris with a dangerous assignment: assassinate the Führer. Wrecked by grief after a Luftwaffe bombing killed her husband and infant daughter, she is armed with a rifle, a vendetta, and a fierce resolve. But other than rushed and rudimentary instruction, she has no formal spy training. Thrust into the red-hot center of the war, a country girl from rural Oregon finds herself holding the fate of the world in her hands. When Kate misses her mark and the plan unravels, Kate is on the run for her life—all the time wrestling with the suspicion that the whole operation was a set-up.
A Single Spy by William Christie
Aleksi Ivanovich Smirnov, an orphan and a thief, has been living by his wits and surviving below the ever-watchful eye of the Soviet system until his luck finally runs out. In 1936, at the age of 16, Aleksi is caught by the NKVD and transported to Moscow. There, in the notorious headquarters of the secret police, he is given a choice: be trained and inserted as a spy into Nazi Germany under the identity of his best friend, the long lost nephew of a high ranking Nazi official, or disappear forever in the basement of the Lubyanka. For Aleksi, it’s no choice at all. Over the course of the next seven years, Aleksi has to live his role, that of the devoted nephew of a high Nazi official, and ultimately works for the legendary German spymaster Wilhelm Canaris as an intelligence agent in the Abwehr. All the while, acting as a double agent—reporting back to the NKVD and avoiding detection by the Gestapo. Trapped between the implacable forces of two of the most notorious dictatorships in history, and truly loyal to no one but himself, Aleksi’s goal remains the same—survival. In 1943, Aleksi is chosen by the Gestapo to spearhead one of the most desperate operations of the war—to infiltrate the site of the upcoming Tehran conference between Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin, and set them up to be assassinated. For Aleksi, it’s the moment of truth; for the rest of the world, the future is at stake.
Under Occupation by Alan Furst
From the master of espionage and intrigue, this novel about heroic resistance fighters in 1942 occupied Paris is based on true events of Polish prisoners in Nazi Germany, who smuggled valuable intelligence to Paris and the resistance.
Occupied Paris in 1942, a dark, treacherous city now ruled by the German security services, where French resistance networks are working secretly to defeat Hitler. Just before he dies, a man being chased by the Gestapo hands off to Paul Ricard a strange looking drawing. It looks like a part for a military weapon; Ricard realizes it must be an important document smuggled out of Germany to aid the resistance. As Ricard is drawn deeper and deeper into the French resistance network, his increasingly dangerous assignments lead him to travel to Germany, and along the underground safe houses of the resistance--and to meet the mysterious and beautiful Leila, a professional spy.
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