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#19th century photo
vintage-sweden · 3 days ago
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Mugshot of Emma Kristina Stolpe, 1897, Sweden. The reason for her arrest is not known, but she had previous warnings for loitering.
A note on loitering charges for women in particular: Prostitution was fully legal, but not socially accepted, so police would instead arrest sex workers for the crime of loitering. 
Loitering included things like wandering around with no explicit purpose, being “a potential threat to public security and decency” or just straight up being unemployed. 
Until 1885, it was actually a crime in Sweden to not have a way to financially support yourself. But even after it was decriminalized, you could still be sentenced to forced labor since that was called “rehabilitation” and not criminal punishment.
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classybelletime · 7 days ago
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Rare New York Photograph from 1898
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history-of-fashion · 8 days ago
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1877 Portrait of Sofia Ahmala (photo by Daniel Nyblin, Helsinki)
(Finnish Heritage Agency)
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history-of-fashion · 12 days ago
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1888 Portrait of E. Kiøsterud and V. Balabanoff (photo by Otto Mayer) 
(Oslo Museum)
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so-yesterday · 14 days ago
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Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, 1870s
National Portrait Gallery / © Alexander Bassano
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winterjourney · 19 days ago
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7 May, 2021: Unknown Faces, Unknown Places II
I bought a collection of fourteen antique glass negatives. I've no idea who these people are or where the unknown photographer took these images over a century ago. They are very wonderful images - the work of someone who knew what they were doing.
These are simple scans, done to see the images. I plan to photograph them directly and produce better images for use in creating cyanotypes.
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winterjourney · 19 days ago
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27 May, 2021: Unknown Faces, Unknown Places I
I bought a collection of fourteen antique glass negatives. I've no idea who these people are or where the unknown photographer took these images over a century ago. They are very wonderful images - the work of someone who knew what they were doing.
These are simple scans, done to see the images. I plan to photograph them directly and produce better images for use in creating cyanotypes.
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so-yesterday · 20 days ago
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The Duke of York with his son, Prince Edward of York, 1898
Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021
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vintage-sweden · 26 days ago
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“Mrs Sjöström“, Sweden.
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vintage-sweden · a month ago
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Theodor Lindman, 1838-1925, Sweden.
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vintage-sweden · a month ago
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Unknown women, 1890s, Sweden.
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tidewatergone · a month ago
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Brock Farm, Quarters, Nimmo (Virginia Beach), Virginia. HABS photo, Library of Congress (HABS VA,77-NIM.V,2--1)
From 1933/41 HABS survey:
"Date of erection: C. 1793
"Present condition: Ruinous
"Description: This is an example of a plank house frequently seen farther west in Virginia and North Carolina but unusual, if not unique, in Princess Anne. It was partially unroofed in the storm of 1933 and, when visited in 1933, had not been repaired. The building is one-story high with a loft in the gable roof. All walls are of planks about three inches thick. These were probably sawn. At the ends they are dovetailed together. The plank walls rest on a brick foimdation wall, laid in Flemish bond. There was evidently never a framed floor, the earth probably having been tainped to an even surface. It should be noted that the sill piece that rests on the brickwork is deeply worn at the door where people have stepped on or across it to the floor below."
This is a fascinating structure. Note the exposed dovetails on the far left planks, and the exposed roof structure (no ridgepole or posts, and temporary bracing on the damaged section). Log or plank building techniques weren't unknown in the Tidewater region, but they don't seem to have been terribly common. Most often they were used for outbuildings and accessory structures, many of which don't survive very long past the point where they aren't being actively used. This is a (now-gone) remnant of the landscape of slavery in Virginia, the kind of structure that would not have been considered worthy of preservation by many people who encountered it in the 20th century. Thankfully the HABS surveyor, Thomas Waterman, thought it was worthy of recording, so we have this image.
Most of the 18th and early 19th-century buildings that remain in Virginia today are the high-style/high-quality (read: attractive and durable) houses built by the slave-owning elite. Nice things tend to survive longer; they have a "keep me" factor that utilitarian things may lack. In the context of American history, that means the big, fancy houses where white slaveholders lived are generally preserved, while the buildings where enslaved people labored and the quarters where they lived are allowed to crumble and rot away (or are deliberately demolished).
The problem with this phenomenon is it leaves out the full story of all the (mostly enslaved) people who lived and labored to support those elite landowners. A landscape empty of all but the "big house" is an incomplete picture, the kind of picture that is still inappropriately romanticized as the "Old South," where the unpleasant bits are conveniently ignored or minimized as desired. History has to be taken with all the bad bits and uncomfortable truths in order to carry an honest meaning. The same goes for historic landscapes and places. (White) People need to see the quarters and outbuildings next to the plantation houses in order to understand the big picture of what was going on in these landscapes.
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history-of-fashion · a month ago
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1890 Cathrine Müller dressed for the ball (photo by Gustav Borgen)
(Oslo Museum)
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acrylicpunk · a month ago
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Jerusalem, Palestine in vintage photographs —
Two Bethlehem women at the Dome of the Rock (1927)
Outside view of Jerusalem (c. 1890s)
Bazaar at the street of the Tower of David (c. 1890s)
Bukharan Jewish dance performed on the Tower of David citadel (1946)
Street in the Old City of Jerusalem (c. 1890s - 1946)
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