secretmellowblog
secretmellowblog
Mellow Blog
I'm Mellow (21, white lesbian, she/they) and I draw daily cats! My redbubble is https://www.redbubble.com/people/MellowArtStuff/shop
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secretmellowblog · 13 hours ago
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Another meowmaid! This time, an anglerfish!
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secretmellowblog · 15 hours ago
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small les misérables moments that unsettled me and/or grabbed my attention so much that I still think about them months after finishing the brick:
- the slang digression’s description of the prison-cellar of the chatelet where prisoners were chained up in the dark for months to years
- valjean the pendulum winding down while trying to visit cosette, but losing momentum every day while children laugh at him :(
- the entire chapter “many interrogation points with regard to a certain le cabuc whose name may not have been le cabuc”
- javert showing up to the barricade with an empty gun
- thénardier almost escaping prison but getting stuck on the final wall from sheer exhaustion
- mabeuf selling his books. actually everything mabeuf ever did
- the fucking RATS in the ELEPHANT
- the nuns losing their minds from the strain of maintaining the perpetual adoration
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secretmellowblog · 22 hours ago
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secretmellowblog · a day ago
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it would certainly be nice if i could see one single post that criticizes fanfiction or ao3 or whatever without reducing the entire medium to “omegaverse destiel pwp” or whatever other stereotype of comically bad fanfic they think will get them the most funnyman points on tumblr today. but maybe doing so would actually require them to acknowledge that fanfiction is not a monolith, and neither are the people who read and write it, and that might mean - heaven forbid! - actually injecting a small dose of nuance into their arguments
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secretmellowblog · a day ago
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Quick doodle to celebrate the end of the college year lol
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
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Valjean's other superpower
So we know Valjean’s got super strength and can climb walls really well, but he also seems to have the ability to make people who don’t normally think, well, do precisely that. 
See Montparnasse’s encounter with Valjean:
Montparnasse, who had no reason to be on his guard, and who was engaged in thought for the first time in his life, perceived nothing. 
See also Javert Derailed:
One of [Javert’s] anxieties consisted in being constrained to think. The very violence of all these conflicting emotions forced him to it. Thought was something to which he was unused, and which was peculiarly painful.
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
Ok I have a couple thoughts I need to share with you:
1: your art is literally the most fantastic thing I’ve seen ever, you are the most talented person on earth
2: I thought of a joke and I think you’ll like it. Why didn’t Marius get with Eponine? Because he wouldn’t Co-settle for her
(Sorry it took so long to respond) but ahhhhh thank you so much!!! 💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙 and lol
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
i love your blog, every time you post it brings me so much joy <3
Ahhh thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
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Brickclub 2.1.7 ‘Napoleon in a good mood’
Fantine Happy, Javert Satisfied, Napoleon in a Good Mood. We’ve been taught to read catastrophe into the title. Things are about to go very, very badly.
How are we meant to read the cheekiness of Napoleon? This book has complicated feelings about Napoleon that I don’t have–Napoleon and I started somewhere below neutral, and I’ve disliked him more with everything I’ve ever learned about him. But Hugo really has some regret and nostalgia for the hero he saw framed in the mist before the villain in his shadow came to the fore. Are we meant to find his silliness charming? I don’t, but Hugo probably wants my feelings to be more mixed than they are.
Regardless, Hugo certainly is framing this arrogance like Javert’s arrogance–as the hubris that presages a terrible fall.
Lacoste, the peasant tied unwillingly in that saddle, feels like the person currently present in all this worth caring about. It’s such a small section, but he’s held hostage, cannonballs are flying around him, and Napoleon is laughing every time Lacoste tries to hide behind him. Dick.
Hugo draws a lot on how smooth and innocent the plain looks now–but it hides not only thousands of bodies but also live and decaying ammo in a way that I hadn’t realized would be true of pre-twentieth century war. We’re led through a kind of archaeological dig in this chapter: Last chapter we learned of the human dangers Napoleon failed to notice, and this chapter we begin to see the geographical ones.
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
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a sequel!
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Grass kitten :3
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secretmellowblog · 2 days ago
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i know it's problematic of me or whatever but i love a fictional bastard who treats breaking the law like a checklist and i love to see them get bingo
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secretmellowblog · 3 days ago
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digital artists how long on average does it take you to finish a piece (line, colour/shade, etc)?
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secretmellowblog · 3 days ago
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Quick sleeping cat doodle because I am tired ahsklfsjdkfjs
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secretmellowblog · 3 days ago
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Brick Club 2.1.19 “The Battlefield At Night”
The moon is full for a few other important events in the Brick. It is full when Valjean robs Myriel and therefore also full for his moral struggle in the field of Petit Gervais, it’s full for Waterloo, it’s full when Valjean climbs over the wall and into the courtyard of the Petit Picpus convent, and it’s (potentially) full for the Jondrette affair. I’m not sure what to do with that information, symbolically, but I figured I’d mark it down.
“Sic vos non vobis” means “For You, But Not Yours,” and were words written by Virgil when another writer plagiarized his work. We saw another instance of this earlier, with Hugo being frustrated that Wellington got all the credit and appreciation wasn’t given to the soldiers who did all the work. Thenardier, now and later, is going to be the personification of this plagiarism.
I don’t understand how Hugo can say that war has realities and that it has ugliness and then believe that victors in war don’t rob the bodies. Does he seriously think that? Sorry, Hugo, I’m with Voltaire on this one.
Wow okay Hugo’s description of the various types that follow in the wake of battle remind me of the various characters that exist in the cour des miracles. These “camp followers” are a mobile cour des miracles, with all the manipulation and disguise and petty thievery and chance-taking and things that that entails.
I don’t think this military cour des miracles is just a description of the types that follow battles. It’s also a quick-and-dirty summary of Thenardier as a personality. He as a singular character embodies all of these characters and characteristics. He is a bearer of uniform who does not fight, he has brought his vendor wagon to the battlefield, as well as his wife, and we are introduced to him in the act of marauding the dead. We are zooming in on the type of people that Thenardier symbolizes, in order to prepare for meeting him. Because a few paragraphs later, he is “neither English nor French, peasant nor soldier, less man than ghoul.” He occupies the same liminal space as the characters on the cour des miracles, who can change appearance at will, manipulate situations, slip into darkness, and who will shut the door as one character and open it as another.
(Side note: I wonder if this is why Thenardier always seems to be portrayed as slimier and even less likeable than any of the rest of Patron Minette. Hugo disapproves of this raiding of dead soldiers. Thenardier is the only one we see who has done this, which makes him even more dishonorable and underhanded than the rest, who rob the living but perhaps don’t dishonor the dead? And perhaps robbing someone murdered by your own hand is different from taking advantage of those killed by others. But maybe I’m going a little sideways from Hugo’s intentions.)
Other people have already mentioned that Ohain is yet another Man Overboard. This time it is not the sea-night of prison, but the drowning crush of tyrannical, selfish society. Also, this time we don’t just have society (carts and/or cannon carriage) crushing the soldiers at Ohain. We have soldiers and horses crushing each other, piling on, fighting each other to survive, getting a horseshoe in the teeth or a heel in the eye. Tyrannical societies don’t just crush the worker and throw him into the night-sea of prison. They force the workers to crush each other, to compete with each other to survive, to tumble down into these hidden pits of poverty or desperation that are impossible to get out of, and then there are no carts on top of them, just other men, and they’re at each other’s throats to try and fight their way out of the pit, but struggling against each other is only going to exhaust them faster, is only going to hurt them more, is only going to suffocate and stifle and kill them quicker.
Oh hey, this is Hugo’s later theory about social mines vaguely popping up. Ohain is society, another drowning man, the drowning of laborers and soldiers via tyranny, via sacrifice for a manipulative society, etc. The lowest depth of Hugo’s social mines is Crime, especially crime that survives society, survives prisons, survives death, but only digs itself down deeper and feeds on that ruination. Those that are in the lowest depths are kind of like cockroaches in that even the most depraved circumstances don’t necessarily destroy them physically, only psychically. And here we have Thenardier, rooting around in the piles of the dead, surviving them only to commit Crime to survive off them.
“He walked with his feet in blood.” is a) a fucking incredible sentence imagery-wise and b) such an interesting thing to say about Thenardier. His hands aren’t bloody: he doesn’t do the killing. He’s a scavenger. But his basis is in blood; he walks in it, as though it’s normal for him, as though he’s walking through mud or sand and can brush it off later. (This may in fact be the only time we see a main character with blood on them that isn’t their own. I can’t think of any other time a character is covered with someone else’s blood.) This is an establishment of how comfortable he is in these depraved situations, an illustration of exactly what qualities he possesses that allow him to survive.
I never realized how much parallel there is between this scene here and the scene where Valjean encounters Thenardier in the sewers. Here, as with Marius in the sewers, Pontmercy is so close to death the Thenardier takes him for dead. Here, as in the sewers, Thenardier steals an object from the “dead” man (ring here, scrap of coat in sewer) and unwittingly helps him to survive (by uncovering him here, by giving Valjean the key in the sewer). He doesn’t know Pontmercy, whose head is covered in blood, and he does not recognize Marius because his head is covered in blood. Pontmercy thanks Thenardier by offering his (already stolen) purse and vowing to remember his name; Marius (unfortunately) expresses his indebtedness to his father’s rescue (and his own, kind of) by paying Thenardier enough that he can leave the country.
One other thought: what I find fascinating about the entire description of Thenardier on the field of Waterloo is that he seems completely alone. Hugo says just a couple sentences before Thenardier is introduced that pillaging continues. And yet Thenardier seems to be the only person out here on the plain, wandering the corpses. He is totally alone until Pontmercy’s hand grasps him suddenly, after he has already robbed him. It reminds me of how alone Valjean was in the field outside Digne, until Petit Gervais came along and his coin rolled to Valjean’s feet. Perhaps this could have been Thenardier’s Petit Gervais moment. Perhaps this is the moment where he could have made the decision to remove his foot from the coin, to return Pontmercy’s purse. Perhaps this is the moment where, if he didn’t do that, he would have moved on, and then questioned his motives, questioned his actions. Except that doesn’t happen. Thenardier cannot and will not have a Petit Gervais moment. He’s too far gone for that.
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secretmellowblog · 3 days ago
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*buzzfeed article title font* Gay Male Characters that I, a Lesbian, Project on, Ranked by How Likely I Would Be to Enter a Lavender Marriage with Them
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secretmellowblog · 4 days ago
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trying to find something out so please rb and give your opinion on these cookies specifically in the tags
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secretmellowblog · 4 days ago
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Grass kitten :3
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secretmellowblog · 5 days ago
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secretmellowblog · 5 days ago
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time to relax and have some me time! *spends five hours clenching my jaw, chewing my lip, sweating, and shivering slightly while laying in bed compulsively refreshing websites* 
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