irishrevolutionaries
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irishrevolutionaries · 9 hours ago
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Remembering Thomas Kent✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Cork Gaol on May 9th 1916. Thomas Kent was born in Bawnard House, Castlelyons, near Fermoy, Co. Cork on August 29th 1865. He was one of the seven sons and two daughters of David Kent, who farmed 200 acres, and his wife Mary Rice. Kent was educated at the local national school, probably until about the age of fourteen or fifteen as was normal in rural areas at the time. He spent five years in Boston, where he worked with a publishing and church furnishings company and participated in Irish cultural activities, many of which were run by the Gaelic League. When he returned home in 1889 he became involved in the Plan of Campaign, a movement for land reform organised by members of the Irish Parliamentary Party. As a result of his involvement, he served two months of hard labour in Cork Gaol, having been convicted for conspiracy to evade the payment of rents. Thomas suffered from ill health due to this experience. In 1914 the Kent brothers organised a branch of the Irish Volunteers at Castlelyons which was said to be the first teetotal branch in the country. In early 1916 the Kent home was raided by the RIC for arms, Thomas spent two months in Cork Gaol for possession of a firearm. When the Kents heard of the Rising they remained away from home hoping for mobilisation orders but returned when it was over, on the night of May 1st. There was a countrywide crackdown on Irish Republicans after the Easter Rising, so when the Kent residence was raided they were met with resistance from Thomas and his brothers Richard, David and William. A gunfight lasted for four hours, in which a RIC officer, Head Constable William Rowe, was killed and David Kent was seriously wounded. Eventually, the Kents were forced to surrender, although Richard made a last-minute dash for freedom and was fatally wounded. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3w65NYv
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Remembering Con Colbert✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on May 8th 1916. Born in the townland of Moanleana, Castlemahon, County Limerick, on October 19th 1888, he was the fourth youngest of thirteen children, of Michael Colbert, a farmer, and Honora McDermott. His family moved to the village of Athea when Con was three years old. He was educated at the local national school. In 1901, his family were living in the townland of Templeathea West. A younger brother, James, and a cousin, Michael Colbert, would later serve as TDs. Colbert left Athea at the age of 16 and went to live with his sister Catherine in Ranelagh, Co. Dublin, he continued his education at a Christian Brothers school in North Richmond Street. Colbert was employed as a clerk in the offices of Kennedy's Bakery in Dublin. In 1911, he was living with Catherine, two other siblings and two boarders at a house on Clifton Terrace, Rathmines. Colbert was sworn into the IRB by his cousin Art O'Donnell in Art's home in 1908. He joined Fianna Éireann at its inaugural meeting in 1909 and rose to Chief Scout. The following year he became a drill instructor at St. Enda's School, founded by Patrick Pearse.[10] In 1912 he became head of an Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) circle within the Fianna started by Bulmer Hobson. During 1913 he was one of a number of Fianna who conducted military training at the Forester's Hall in Rutland Square (now Parnell Square), and in November that year, he joined the Provisional Committee of the newly formed Irish Volunteers. In the weeks leading up to the Easter Rising, he acted as a bodyguard for Thomas Clarke. Before the Rising, because he lived out of the city he stayed with the Cooney family in the city centre. During Easter Week, he fought at Watkin's Brewery, Jameson's Distillery and Marrowbone Lane. Colbert surrendered with the Marrowbone Lane Garrison along with the South Dublin Union Garrison, which had been led by Éamonn Ceannt. When the order to surrender was issued, he assumed the command of his unit to save the life of his superior officer, who was a married man. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3ew2fsA
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Remembering Seán Heuston✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary Seán Heuston was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on May 8th 1916. Heuston was born in Dublin on February 21st 1891 and educated by the Christian Brothers. He worked as a railway clerk in Limerick and while there took an active part in Fianna Éireann, of which he was an officer and also joined the IRB. Seán Heuston arranged for members who could not afford to buy their uniforms to do so by paying small weekly sums. Under his guidance, the Fianna in Limerick had a course that encompasses not only drilling, which was made up of signalling, scout training and weapons training but also lectures on Irish history and Irish classes. Heuston joined the Irish Volunteers after his return to Dublin in 1913 to work at the GSWR depot at Kingsbridge (later renamed Heuston Station after him). Recalled by many as dapper and serious in intent, albeit with a good sense of humour, Heuston was the main breadwinner for his family, who now lived on Fontenoy St near Phibsborough. Heuston was in charge of a company of the Dublin Brigade of the Volunteers based on Blackhall Place. Heuston was the Officer Commanding of the Volunteers in the Mendicity Institution (now called Houston's Fort) on the south side of Dublin city. Acting under Orders from James Connolly, Heuston was to hold this position for three or four hours, to delay the advance of British troops. Having successfully held the position for the specified period, he was to go on to hold it for over two days, with twenty-six Volunteers. With his position becoming untenable against considerable numbers, and the building almost completely surrounded, he sent a dispatch to Connolly informing him of their position. The dispatch was carried by two Volunteers, P. J. Stephenson and Seán McLaughlin, who had to avoid both sniper fire and British troops across the city. It was soon after sending this dispatch that Heuston decided to surrender. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3f75xRS
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Remembering Michael Mallin✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary Michael Mallin was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on May 8th 1916. Mallin was born in Dublin on December 1st 1874, the eldest of nine children of John Mallin, a carpenter, and his wife Sarah (née Dowling). The family lived in a tenement in the Liberties neighbourhood. He received his early education at the National School at Denmark Street. Mallin's mother witnessed the murder of the Manchester Martyrs. According to his brother Thomas, their father was a "strong nationalist and he and Michael had many a political argument" Mallin enrolled as a member of the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers on 21 October 1889. During the early years of his service, he was stationed in Great Britain and Ireland. His regiment was sent to India in 1896, where he served out the remainder of his almost fourteen-year career and took part in the Tirah Campaign. It was during Mallin's time in India that he became radicalised. In 1897, when asked to donate to the memorial fund for Queen Victoria's jubilee year he refused because 'he could not subscribe as the English monarch had taken an oath to uphold the Protestant faith'. Mallin was awarded the India Medal of 1895 with the Punjab Frontier and Tirah clasps 1897–98. On Mallin's return to Ireland, he became a silk weaver's apprentice under his uncle James, who had retired from the British Army and was the Secretary of the Socialist Party of Ireland. Mallin progressed to become a leading official in the silk weavers' union. During the 1913 Lockout, he led a strike of silk workers at the Hanbury Lane factory. The strike lasted for thirteen weeks, with Mallin an effective negotiator on behalf of the strikers. Mallin was appointed second-in-command and chief training officer of the Irish Citizen Army (ICA), which was formed to protect workers from the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) and employer-funded gangs of strike-breakers. Under the tutelage of Mallin and James Connolly, the ICA became an effective military force, in October 1914 Mallin was appointed Chief of Staff of the ICA. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3vWzDi1
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Remembering Éamonn Ceannt✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on May 8th 1916. Edward Thomas Kent was born in the little village of Ballymoe, overlooking the River Suck in County Galway on September 21st 1881. His parents were James Kent and Joanne Galway, Éamonn was the sixth of seven children. His father, James Kent was a Royal Irish Constabulary officer. Stationed in Ballymoe, in 1883 he was promoted and transferred to Ardee, County Louth. When his father retired from the force, the family moved to Dublin. They were a very religious Catholic family and it has been said that Ceannt's religious teaching as a child stayed with him for the rest of his life. While living in county Louth, Ceannt attended the De La Salle national school. After 5 years of schooling in Louth, the family moved to Drogheda, where he attended the Christian Brothers school, Sunday's Gate (Now Scholars Townhouse Hotel). They moved to Dublin in 1892 and lived in Drumcondra. Here he attended the North Richmond Street Christian Brothers School. Two other leaders from the 1916 rising, Seán Heuston and Con Colbert, were educated at that school. Ceannt achieved excellent results in his final exams before leaving school. After finishing he was presented with the opportunity to work for the civil service but turned this position down as he felt he would be working for the British. He went on to secure a job with the clerical staff of the City Treasurer and Estates and Finances office; he was working as an accountant with the Dublin Corporation from 1901-1916. In 1899, Ceannt joined the central branch of the Gaelic League. It was here where he first met many of the men who would play a major role in the rising, including Patrick Pearse and Eoin MacNeill. Ceannt was an extremely committed member of the league, he was an elected a member of the governing body and by 1905 he was teaching Irish language classes in branch offices of the league. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3vTs4s2
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irishrevolutionaries · 3 days ago
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Remembering The Phoenix Park Assassinations. On May 6th 1882, an Irish Republican group known as "The Invincibles" assassinated the Chief Secretary for Ireland Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke who was the Permanent Undersecretary (head of British administration in Ireland). Ireland at the time was heading towards another "Great Hunger" with potato blight, mass evictions, and mass emigration affecting the Irish poor while the Landlord class became even more wealthy. Parnell had agreed on the Kilmainham treaty and was released from Kilmainham Gaol only a few days previous, in protest at his release Chief Secretary "Buckshot" Forster resigned and was replaced by Lord Frederick. The Invincibles, an offshoot of the IRB had made previous attempts to assassinate "Buckshot" Forster so now set their sights on taking out Thomas Henry Burke. They were determined to strike back against the mass evictions happening in Ireland. On May 5th, at Ballina the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) had opened fire and charged a peaceful crowd, killing several children under the age of fourteen. The Invincibles decided to strike back immediately. Newly installed Chief Secretary for Ireland Lord Frederick Cavendish, on the very day of his arrival to Ireland, was walking with Burke to the Viceregal Lodge, the "out of season" residence of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. The first assassination in the park was committed by Joe Brady, who attacked Burke with a 12-inch knife, followed in short order by Tim Kelly, who knifed Cavendish. Both men used surgical knives. The British press expressed outrage and demanded that the "Phoenix Park Murderers" be brought to justice. A large number of suspects were arrested. By playing off one suspect against another, Superintendent Mallon of "G" Division of the Dublin Metropolitan Police got several of them to reveal what they knew. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3b8Z082
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irishrevolutionaries · 4 days ago
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Bobby Sands Street✊🇮🇪 Irish Republicans in Dublin have renamed Merrion Road where the British Embassy is situated to Bobby Sands Street. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/33dPdJL
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irishrevolutionaries · 4 days ago
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Remembering Bobby Sands, 40th Anniversary✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary, died on hunger strike in Long Kesh on this day in 1981. Robert Gerard Sands was born on March 4th 1954 to John and Rosaleen Sands in Abbots Cross, Newtownabbey, County Antrim, outside North Belfast. Sands was the eldest of four children. His younger sisters, Marcella and Bernadette, were born in 1955 and 1958, respectively. He also had a younger brother, John, born in 1962. After experiencing harassment and intimidation from their neighbours, the family abandoned the development and moved in with friends for six months before being granted housing in the nearby Rathcoole development. Bobby went to school in the local Stella Maris, he played left-back for the local team also called Stella Maris, the team had both Nationalists and Unionists playing. But by 1966 Loyalists had stirred up sectarian tensions in Rathcoole and other parts of Belfast, his friends from a Protestant/Unionist background now wouldn't talk to him. Bobby left school in 1969 at age 15, and enrolled in Newtownabbey Technical College, beginning an apprenticeship as a coachbuilder at Alexander's Coach Works in 1970. Bobby worked there for less than a year, enduring constant harassment from his Protestant co-workers, which according to several co-workers he ignored completely, as he wished to learn a meaningful trade. He was eventually confronted after leaving his shift in January 1971 by a number of his coworkers wearing the armbands of the local Ulster loyalist tartan gang. He was held at gunpoint and told that Alexander's was off-limits to "Fenian scum" and to never come back if he valued his life. He later said that this event was the point at which he decided that militancy was the only solution. In June 1972, Sands's parents' home was attacked and damaged by a loyalist mob and they were again forced to move, this time to the West Belfast Catholic area of Twinbrook, where Sands, now thoroughly embittered, rejoined them. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3h2NyyS
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irishrevolutionaries · 4 days ago
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Remembering John MacBride✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on this day in 1916. John MacBride was born at The Quay, Westport, County Mayo, on May 7th 1868, to Patrick MacBride, a shopkeeper and trader, and the former Honoria Gill, who survived her son. MacBride was educated at the Christian Brothers' School, Westport, and at St. Malachy's College, Belfast. His red hair and long nose led to him being given the nickname "Foxy Jack" MacBride worked for a period in a drapery shop in Castlerea, County Roscommon. He had studied medicine, but gave it up and began working with a chemist's firm in Dublin. MacBride joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood and was associated with Michael Cusack in the early days of the Gaelic Athletic Association. He also joined the Celtic Literary Society through which he came to know Arthur Griffith who was to remain a friend and influence throughout his life. Beginning in 1893, MacBride was termed a "dangerous nationalist" by the British government. In 1896 he went to the United States on behalf of the IRB. In the same year, he returned and emigrated to South Africa. In 1889 the second Boer war broke out, Macbride took the side of the Boers against the British and raised the Irish Transvaal Brigade who were mostly Irish or Irish American living in Transvaal. What became known as MacBride's Brigade was first commanded by an Irish American, Colonel John Blake, an ex-US Cavalry Officer. MacBride recommended Blake as Commander since MacBride himself had no military experience. The Brigade roughly 500 strong was given official recognition by the Boer Government with the commissions of the Brigade's officers signed by State Secretary F.W. Reitz. MacBride was commissioned with the rank of Major in the Boer army and given Boer citizenship. A Second Irish Brigade was organised by Arthur Lynch. The arrival in the Irish camp of an Irish-American Ambulance Corps bolstered MacBride's Brigade. Michael Davitt who had resigned as an M.P visited MacBride's Brigade. When Col. Blake was injured at Ladysmith MacBride had to take sole command of the Brigade. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3ulYI5h
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irishrevolutionaries · 5 days ago
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Remembering The First Blanketman Kieran Nugent✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary died on this day in 2000. In March 1976 the British Government removed political status for Republican and Loyalist prisoners in the six counties. Anyone ‘convicted’ of political offences would now be treated as ordinary criminal prisoners, they would have to wear a uniform, do prison work etc. Kieran Nugent from Belfast arrived in the newly constructed H-blocks in September 1976 and was handed a prison uniform by the screws to which he replied “you will have to nail it to my back”. Instead of the uniform he took a blanket into his cell and the Blanket protest for political status was born. By Christams 1976 Kieran was joined by over 40 Republican prisoners on the Blanket protest which overtime developed into a no wash protest and then the hunger strikes of 1980 and 1981. On May 4th 2000 Kieran Nugent died of a heart attack in his home in Andersonstown West Belfast. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3vDd1mo
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irishrevolutionaries · 5 days ago
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Remembering Willie Pearse✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on this day in 1916. William (Willie) Pearse was born on November 15th, 1881, two years after his brother Padraig in the same house on Great Brunswick Street(Now Pearse Street). From his birth to his death Willie was the closest friend his brother ever had. Willie inherited his father's artistic abilities and became a sculptor. He was educated at the Christian Brothers School, Westland Row and later studied at the Metropolitan School of Art in Dublin, the Kensington School of Art in London, and for a while, he also studied art in Paris. With his sister Mary Brigid, he formed the Leinster Stage Society, which put on plays at the Abbey Theatre for the financial benefit of St. Enda’s the school he helped his brother run in 1908, giving up on his father's stonemason business. Willie was a member of the Irish Volunteers and held the rank of Staff Captain. During Easter Week he was the aide-de-camp to his brother and served as a courier for his brother, making sure orders were delivered to rebel-held positions around Dublin. Following the surrender, he was court-martialled and sentenced to death. It has been said that as he was only a minor player in the struggle, it was his surname that condemned him. The British tried to bring Willie from Richmond Barracks to visit Padraig before he was shot at Kilmainham, but when he got to the Gaol, he was told he was “Too late.” But unlike Padraig, he was visited the night before his execution by his mother and sister Margaret. Willie was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on the morning of May 4th 1916. Fuair sé bás ar son saoirse na hÉireann — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3egMnKb
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irishrevolutionaries · 5 days ago
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Remembering Michael O'Hanrahan✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on this day in 1916. He was born as Michael Hanrahan in New Ross, County Wexford on January 16th 1877, the son of Richard Hanrahan, a cork cutter, and Mary Williams. his father was involved in the Fenian Rising in 1867. The family moved to Carlow, where Michael was educated at Carlow Christian Brothers' School and Carlow College Academy. On leaving school he worked various jobs including a period alongside his father in the cork-cutting business. In 1898 he joined the Gaelic League and in 1899 founded the League's first Carlow branch and became its secretary. By 1903 he was in Dublin, where he was working as a proof-reader for the Gaelic League printer Cló Cumann. He published journalism under the bylines 'Art' and 'Irish Reader' in several nationalist newspapers, including Sinn Féin and the Irish Volunteer. He was the author of two novels A Swordsman of the Brigade (1914) and When the Norman Came (published posthumously in 1918). In 1903 King Edward VII visited Ireland, O'Hanrahan helped with Maud Gonne and Arthur Griffith's campaign against the visit which led him to join Sinn Fein when it formed in 1905, he also joined the IRB but it's not known when he joined. In November 1913 he joined the Irish Volunteers. O'Hanrahan was later employed as an administrator on the Volunteers headquarters staff. He was made quartermaster general of the 2nd Battalion. He and the commandant of the 2nd Battalion Thomas MacDonagh became close friends. During the Easter Rising, he was second in command of Dublin's 2nd battalion under Commandant Thomas MacDonagh. He fought at Jacob's Biscuit Factory, though the battalion saw little action other than intense sniping throughout Easter week, as the British Army largely kept clear of the impregnable factory dominating the road from Portobello Barracks on one side and Dublin Castle on the other. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3tfACIb
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irishrevolutionaries · 5 days ago
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Remembering Edward Daly✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on this day in 1916. Born as John Edward Daly at 26 Frederick Street (now O'Curry street), Limerick on February 25th 1891, Daly was the only son among the ten children born to Edward and Catherine Daly (née O'Mara). Daly was the younger brother of Kathleen Clarke, wife of Tom Clarke, and an active member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB). His father, Edward, was a Fenian (IRB member) who died five months before his son's birth at the age of forty-one. Daly's uncle was John Daly, a prominent Republican who had taken part in the Fenian Rising and Fenian Dynamite Campaign. It was through John Daly that Clarke had met his future wife. Daly was educated by the Presentation Sisters at Sexton Street, the Congregation of Christian Brothers at Roxboro Road and at Leamy’s commercial college. He spent a short time as an apprentice baker in Glasgow, before returning to Limerick to work in Spaight's timber yard. Daly later moved to Dublin where he eventually took up a position with a wholesale chemist. In 1913 he moved to Dublin where he lived with Kathleen and Tom Clarke. In November 1913 Daly joined the newly founded Irish Volunteers. He soon reached the rank of captain. He was assiduous in his study of military manuals and the professionalism of his company gained the admiration of senior officers in actions such as the Howth gun-running of 1914. In March 1915, he was promoted to the rank of the commandant of the 1st Battalion, he was also a member of the IRB but it's not known when he joined. Like many other of the Rising's leaders, Daly was a member of the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League. During the Easter Rising, Daly's battalion, stationed in the Four Courts and areas to the west and north of the centre of Dublin, saw some of the harshest fighting of the rising. He was forced very reluctantly to surrender his battalion on April 29th by Padraig Pearse. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/33cz47d
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irishrevolutionaries · 5 days ago
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Remembering The Irish Revolutionary Joseph Plunkett✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary was executed in Kilmainham Gaol on this day in 1916. Plunkett was born at 26 Upper Fitzwilliam Street in one of Dublin's most affluent districts. Both his parents came from wealthy backgrounds, his father, George Noble Plunkett, had been made a papal count. Plunkett contracted tuberculosis (TB) at a young age and spent part of his youth in the warmer climates of the Mediterranean and North Africa. He spent time in Algiers where he studied Arabic literature and language and composed poetry in Arabic. Plunkett was educated at the Catholic University School (CUS) and by the Jesuits at Belvedere College in Dublin and later at Stonyhurst College, in Lancashire, England where he acquired some military knowledge from the Officers' Training Corps. But Joseph Plunkett took an active interest in Irish heritage and the Irish language, and also studied Esperanto. Plunkett was one of the founders of the Irish Esperanto League. He joined the Gaelic League and began studying with Thomas MacDonagh, with whom he formed a lifelong friendship. In 1915 Joseph Plunkett joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood and soon after was sent to Germany to meet with Roger Casement, who was negotiating with the German government on behalf of Ireland. Casement's role as emissary was self-appointed, and, as he was not a member of the IRB, that organisation's leadership wished to have one of their own contact Germany to negotiate German aid for an uprising the following year. Plunkett was one of the original members of the IRB Military Committee that were responsible for planning the Easter Rising, and it was largely his plan that was followed. Shortly before the rising was to begin, Plunkett was hospitalised following a turn for the worse in his health. Still bandaged from an operation, he took his place in the General Post Office with several other of the Rising's leaders such as Patrick Pearse and Tom Clarke, though his health prevented him from being very active. His energetic aide de camp was Michael Collins. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3b1CZIj
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irishrevolutionaries · 6 days ago
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May 3rd 1921 Ireland Partitioned By The British Government. The Government of Ireland Act 1920 came into force on this day in 1921, forced onto the Irish people so the Tories could stay in power in Westminster with the backing of Unionist MPs. 100 years on, the British Government is still ignoring the wishes of the vast majority of the Irish people who want to see a British withdrawal from Ireland. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3eTZMXT
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irishrevolutionaries · 6 days ago
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Remembering Tom Clarke✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary and Fenian was executed in Kilmainham Gaol, this day in 1916. Clarke was born at Hurst Castle, on March 11th 1858., Milford-on-Sea, Hampshire, England, opposite the Isle of Wight, to Irish parents, Mary Palmer and James Clarke, who was a sergeant in the British Army. In 1865, after spending some years in South Africa, Sgt. Clarke was transferred to Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland, and it was there that Tom grew up. In 1878, at the age of 20, he joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) following the visit to Dungannon by John Daly, and by 1880 he was the leader of the local IRB circle, but later that year, following an attack on the RIC, Clarke fled to the USA. In the United States Clarke became involved in the Fenians, in 1883 under the alias of "Henry Wilson", Clarke was sent to England to take part in the Fenian dynamite campaign advocated by Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, one of the IRB leaders exiled in the United States. Clarke was arrested in possession of dynamite, along with three others. He was tried and sentenced to penal servitude for life on May 28th 1883 at London's Old Bailey; he subsequently served 15 years in Pentonville and other British prisons. Following his release in 1898 he moved to Brooklyn in the United States where he married Kathleen Daly, 21 years his junior, whose uncle, John Daly, he had met in prison. Clarke worked for the Clan na Gael under John Devoy. In 1906 the couple moved to a 30-acre (120,000 m2) farm in Manorville, New York, and bought another 30 acres (120,000 m2) there in 1907, shortly before returning to Ireland later that same year. In Ireland, he opened a tobacconist shop in Dublin and immersed himself in the IRB which was undergoing a substantial rejuvenation under the guidance of younger men such as Bulmer Hobson and Denis McCullough. Clarke had a very close kinship with Hobson, who along with Seán MacDermott, became his protegé. Clarke did not get involved in the Irish Volunteers as it had the backing of the Irish Parliamentary party, but he kept a keen interest as he and other members of the IRB planned a rebellion. More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/336Wg6O
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irishrevolutionaries · 6 days ago
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Remembering Thomas McDonagh✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary, poet and one of the leaders of the Easter rising was executed on this day in 1916. He was born, as Joseph McDonagh, in Cloughjordan, County Tipperary, to Joseph McDonagh, a schoolmaster, and Mary Parker. He grew up in a household filled with music, poetry and learning and was instilled with a love of both English and Irish culture from a young age. Both his parents were teachers; who strongly emphasised education. MacDonagh attended Rockwell College. While there MacDonagh spent several years as a scholastic, sometimes preparation for a missionary career, however, after a few years he realised that it wasn't the life for him, and left. Very soon after, he published his first book of poems, Through the Ivory Gate, in 1902. He taught in St Kieran's College in Kilkenny and from 1903 he was employed as a professor of French, English and Latin at St. Colman's College, Fermoy, Co Cork, where he also formed a branch of the Gaelic League. While in Fermoy, MacDonagh was one of the founding members of ASTI, the secondary teachers association which was formed in the Fermoy College in 1908. He moved to Dublin, soon establishing strong friendships with such men as Eoin MacNeill and Patrick Pearse. His friendship with Pearse and his love of Irish led him to join the staff of Pearse's bilingual St. Enda's School upon its establishment in 1908, taking the role of French and English teacher and Assistant Headmaster. On January 3rd 1912 he married Muriel Gifford (a member of the Church of Ireland, though neither she nor he was a churchgoer); their son, Donagh, was born that November, and their daughter, Barbara, in March 1915. Muriel's sister, Grace Gifford, was to marry Joseph Mary Plunkett hours before his execution in 1916. MacDonagh was a member of the Irish Women's Franchise League. He supported the strikers during the Dublin lockout and was a member of the "Industrial Peace Committee" alongside Joseph Plunkett, whose stated aim was to achieve a fair outcome to the dispute. More In The Comments. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3vH89Nd
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irishrevolutionaries · 6 days ago
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Remembering Padraig Pearse✊🇮🇪 The Irish Revolutionary, poet and leader of the Easter rising was executed on this day in 1916. Patrick Henry Pearse Pearse, his brother Willie, and his sisters Margaret and Mary Brigid were born at 27 Great Brunswick Street, Dublin, the street that is named after them today. Pearse grew up surrounded by books. His father had had very little formal education but was self-educated. Pearse was radicalised from an early age. He recalls that at the age of ten he prayed to God, promising him he would dedicate his life to Irish freedom. Pearse's early heroes were ancient Gaelic folk heroes such as Cúchulainn, though in his 30s he began to take a strong interest in the leaders of past republican movements, such as the United Irishmen Theobald Wolfe Tone and Robert Emmet. Pearse soon became involved in the Gaelic revival. In 1896, at the age of 16, he joined the Gaelic League (Conradh na Gaeilge), and in 1903, at the age of 23, he became editor of its newspaper An Claidheamh Soluis ("The Sword of Light"). In 1900, Pearse was awarded a B.A. in Modern Languages (Irish, English and French) by the Royal University of Ireland, for which he had studied for two years privately and for one at University College Dublin. In the same year, he was enrolled as a Barrister-at-Law at the King's Inns. Pearse was called to the bar in 1901. In 1905, Pearse represented Neil McBride, a poet and songwriter from Feymore, Creeslough, Donegal, who had been fined for having his name displayed in "illegible" writing (i.e. Irish) on his donkey cart. The appeal was heard before the Court of King's Bench in Dublin. It was Pearse's first and only court appearance as a barrister. The case was lost but it became a symbol of the struggle for Irish independence. In his June 27th 1905 An Claidheamh Soluis column, Pearse wrote of the decision, "...it was in effect decided that Irish is a foreign language on the same level with Yiddish." More In The Comments Section. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3nNXSvN
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irishrevolutionaries · 7 days ago
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Remembering The Lackelly Ambush 100th Anniversary. Around noon on May 2nd 1921, twelve members of the East and Mid-Limerick Flying Columns, who had stayed overnight in four houses at Knockcarron, assembled on the road between Fitzpatricks house and OCallaghans. They were surprised by 17 soldier-cyclists from the Green Howard Regiment of the British Army based in Galbaly. A long battle ensued which resulted in the deaths of four IRA Vols Tom Howard (Glenbrohane), Willie Riordan (Cullane, Ballylanders) John Frahill and Patrick Ryan Waller (Murroe) were killed. There were no casualties on the British side. Fuair siad bás ar son Saoirse na hÉireann. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/3nH2YtN
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irishrevolutionaries · 7 days ago
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May 2nd 1916, Court Martial Of The 1916 Leaders Begins. The 1916 rising was a major embarrassment for the British so General Maxwell is determined to show the Irish people that rebellion against the crown will not be tolerated. In the immediate aftermath of the 1916 rising, around 3,500 people were arrested around the country, the vast majority of those are brought to Richmond Barracks in Dublin where the leaders are identified and sent for court-martial. The 'gallant allies in Europe" part of the proclamation was not enough to prove a German connection to the rising so a letter Padraig Pearse wrote to his mother that mentioned help from a "German Fleet" was enough to charge the leaders with "rebellion with the intention and for the purpose of assisting the enemy”, if found guilty of this charge meant the death penalty. Starting on May 2nd 1916, 160 prisoners were tried by field general court-martial. The prisoners were held at Richmond Barracks, where they were lined up to be called into a dingy little office on the corner of the square. The trials took place here: None of the prisoners was allowed legal representation and most trials lasted no more than 10 or 15 minutes. The prisoners did not have access to the rules under which these trials were conducted. Had they done so, they might have asked for the few legal entitlements that the rules allowed; free access to defence witnesses was one, time to prepare a defence was another. Such was General Maxwell's lust for revenge he ignored all advice even from the viceroy of Ireland at the time not to go ahead with the executions, his decision to execute the leaders starting on May 3rd 1916 was probably the biggest mistake the British ever made in Ireland. — view on Instagram https://ift.tt/2SlQUmb
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