homesteadchronicles
homesteadchronicles
Dear Writers: Welcome Home
Welcome one and all to a community meant to inspire those capable of artistic masterpieces - that means you! And, with any luck, myself as well. Who am I? My name is Jake - an aspiring author, pastor-in-training, super spaz, secret geek and self-decided INFJ. Care to take a peek at my current projects? Check out the links for Kingdom Come, and keep your eyes peeled for more WIP pages soon to come!
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homesteadchronicles · 10 hours ago
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i think, i see a lot of posts and quotes alright about how writers are out here to say something and to challenge ideas and like yes definitely there are amazing amazing books and stories that do that and i 100% agree they deserve all the awards because they are genuinely amazing, but also i think there is a place for stories that are just there to be entertaining wish fulfilment there’s nothing wrong with just writing something designed to be fun
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homesteadchronicles · 11 hours ago
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People: Writers don't want too many comments from me...
People: Oh, I don't have anything interesting to comment.
Me, a writer: I can't wait to print this "<3" comment out and tape it to my wall with all the others. :)
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homesteadchronicles · 13 hours ago
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Even if your motivation isn't to become really famous or even published, you are still amazing. And you are still an inspiration.
AND YOU ARE STILL VALID AS A CREATOR.
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homesteadchronicles · 14 hours ago
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my favorite kind of conflict in a story is “no one is 100% right, but no one is 100% wrong either” - situations where every side has a pretty good point. it’s tragically rare.
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homesteadchronicles · 16 hours ago
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Writing should be fun. Writing should be an adventure. Writing is about connecting with your imagination and listening to her guidance. Let go of the notion of perfection and simply enjoy the process. Your writing is good enough, whether you believe it or not.
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homesteadchronicles · 17 hours ago
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adults don't stop having imaginary friends we just start referring to them as original characters
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homesteadchronicles · 19 hours ago
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AWWWW, RAT! Thank you so much, my friend. That really means a lot to me. Someone else once pointed out to me how often I employ parallelism and turn of phrase - which have since become my favorite tools to utilize - so I’m glad they made all the difference here.
Thank you for reading and for the feedback! Hope you’re doing well in your own writing too, and that the inspiration is flowing freely :)
A Cycle of Seals: Writing Excerpt (Princess of Impotence)
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After three months of continual debate on whether or not to post this excerpt, my friends convinced me to submit it on-stream tonight. While it imperfectly handles heavy topics I myself am still working through, I hope you see the heart and healing process behind it - and, most importantly, behind Eirys.
You may remember these three from my recent Character Description Challenge! I can never get enough of writing their dynamic, even as their in-canon scenes continue to dwindle through editing. Whomp.
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Project: A Cycle of Seals Timeline: Pre-Book One Canonical? No Context:
The House of Salvation has long isolated society’s sick. The Godewine twins - Royan and Eirys - visit every dawn and tend to the condemned. While Royan attracts the masses with the supernatural power of his Timekeeper’s Seal, the powerless Eirys attends to one individual: Oeden Sincairn, locked away even from the other infirm. 
Content Warnings: Illness, Isolation, Mentions of Ableism
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The Yoreword warns of a wickedness more contagious than any sickness, one bestowed upon the lowest amongst them. Eirys has never - paragons forgive her blasphemy - believed that. Illness did not demean one’s internal divinity. Not when the skin-deep sainthood of her fellow nobles could nauseate an angel. Even still, sacrilege guides her away from those surrounding her blessed sibling to instead seek solace with the kingdom’s most corrupted citizen.
With the crowd thoroughly enthralled by Royan’s abilities, Eirys slips outside their thinning scope of notice and down the western hall. While the main chamber had been filled to overflowing with the infirm, naught but a begrudging servant files through the passage here. Those who notice her appearance regard her with the civil disinterest paid to one of their own. Or had they purposely dismissed their princess? Nonsense, she thinks (but does not believe).
Would such insolence not make sense? She is no Shepherd. She bears no Seal. She does not sway the hearts of nobles like Isolde, does not command the arms of soldiers like Sigrid, does not awe the minds of scholars like Ciaran. She is but another stumbling block to the damned’s salvation, a scourge to kiss their scars.
Why must power inhabit those who refuse to wield it well? That question had no answer, or at least not one the spirits deign to supply.
Yet, despite her inherent impotence, one resident still awaits her entrance.
Keep reading
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homesteadchronicles · 20 hours ago
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one very underrated trope is allies to lovers, actually. Like y’all aren’t really friends, exactly. You just happen to be on the same side of a war or are stuck together on a mission. And you really couldn’t care less about each other as long as both of you do your jobs right. But then one of you ends up saving the other or something and indifference turns to respect which eventually grows to become loyalty. And one day, you’re talking about what you’re gonna do once this war/mission/job ends and y’all go your separate ways and you’re suddenly struck by the realization that maybe you don’t want it to end
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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This comic is for you all whose English is a second language for you. <3
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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Guess who finally finished their fanfiction? 😍
Not me, but someone probably did
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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Quotable – Adriana Trigiani
Find out more about the author here
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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writing tip #3114:
the best potential romantic partner for your protagonist is me
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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“Reading was my escape and my comfort, my consolation, my stimulant of choice: reading for the pure pleasure of it, for the beautiful stillness that surrounds you when you hear an author’s words reverberating in your head.”
— Paul Auster, The Brooklyn Follies
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
Hi! I have a question. When someone is shouting in a novel, how do I write? I mean, can I use capital letters only, like this : "WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU DOING"
Or it isn't correct?
How do I write it, instead?
Thank u 🤍
There are several ways to do it, including the capslock option. The technique that best fits the tone of your story is the one you should use.
Capslock is rather informal, so if you're going for a serious story you wouldn't use it. A comedy or children's book might use capslock to indicate volume.
Exclamation marks are the obvious choice, but use them rarely as they have a jarring quality when you see too many too often.
Italics can be used, though they more often indicate emphasis than volume. Combined with an exclamation mark, however, an italicized sentence gains extra volume. Don't use this for an entire paragraph, just one line that really matters.
Adverbs are best (he yelled/she shouted). Since these too can become exhausting if overused, use them wisely.
Apply "show, don't tell" by using dialogue and body language cues to show the audience that someone is yelling and/or upset.
It may be a good idea to use a combination of techniques when a scene calls for it. Let's say we know characters are yelling because their dialogue and gestures are excited, but one of them raises their voice louder, then you might use italics and an exclamation mark for that line. Also, if you've started an argument with an adverb like "yelled," readers can then assume the rest of the dialogue is loud without being told again.
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homesteadchronicles · a day ago
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Every Wednesday, we develop a different area of our fictional worlds together. Inspirational prompts are posted every Wednesday night - and if you’re lucky, you might even learn a little more about the lore from one of my own worlds!
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Today’s Prompt: What do weddings in this world entail?
Are there any portions of the celebrations that are unique to this world? This could be anything, from an event to the clothing styles to the decor itself.
Why do people wed? In most cases, it is because of love. In others, it can be political or arranged by one’s society. But in fictional universes, more can be at stake. Maybe it’s predetermined by a supernatural force! Maybe people combine their lines to instill magical power in their children. Perhaps you have to shack up with whoever’s closest just to survive.
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Want to participate in Worldbuilding Wednesday? Reblog this post with your response to the above prompt so I can feature it on my blog and engage more with your about your character!
Want to suggest a future question? Feel free to DM me (@homesteadchronicles) with any comments, questions or feedback about this project! My inbox is always open.
Want to meet other authors in a welcoming community? Join our Discord server, “The Homestead”, to find a casual collection of likeminded artists of every kind. Message me for an invite code!
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homesteadchronicles · 2 days ago
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I really like “pretentious” writing styles. Complex language, labyrinthine sentences, long parenthetical asides… I love them. It’s like going on a scenic tour and encountering strange and wondrous new sights and sounds. Language is beautiful and words are free, so why be economical? Indulge! Be decadent!
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homesteadchronicles · 2 days ago
What do you do with Too Many Ideas Syndrome?
At first you embrace it: “I’ll never stop writing ‘cause I’ll never run out of ideas! This is awesome!!!!” And then you realize that with so many ideas, you’re going to have to pick one to run with and then it’s like uh…yeah…  
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Too Many Ideas
This question has given me the opportunity to bring back the cute bunny post from 2015. In it I discuss how you bounce back and forth between ideas, so take a look. It might help!
In that post I mention that it’s really a matter of going with whatever idea is most interesting to you at any given time. This could change from day to day, so one day you might work with one idea and the next you work with another. This is really basic advice, so I’m going to try to take it one step further. 
Start with Your Characters
If you’re overwhelmed by how many concept/plot ideas you’ve got, make a list of each concrete idea and set it aside. Then, work on character development. Start with one key character and then work outward. 
You might be wondering, how do I create characters without any kind of plot, but writers do actually do this. We’ve got questions in our inbox right now from writers that have developed characters and are stumped on the plot. So it’s definitely possible. 
This key character you’re starting with? Begin by establishing aspects of them that are separate from plot, things like age, gender ID, racial/ethnic background, sexual ID, and obviously their name. Go as far as you feel compelled to go, but start with these basic facts. 
Then, think about their relationships/friendships. Do they have lifelong friends they knew as children? Do they have siblings they’re close with? A parent they bond well with? Think about those they’re friendly with, and then do the same thing you did when you started with your key character - their age, gender ID, ect. ect.
Next, think about potential future relationships. These don’t have to be romantic relationships. If your key character is an artsy type, maybe you envision them clashing with someone who operates with logic and reason, and then seeing how they become friends or enemies over it. This leads you to create yet another character. 
What you’re doing here is developing character dynamics. You’re thinking about who these characters are first, before you even begin to consider what will happen to them. Having a cast of characters in place before you plot anything out can immediately draw you in. As I’ve said before, this is one reason we write fanfiction. We’re attached to the established characters and we want to imagine them in new situations. 
The Character Quick-Change
Grab the list you made earlier of all your plot ideas and concepts. Start casting them in roles in the ideas you’ve already come up and see how they fit. One of your ideas might be set in a fictional, fantasy world with fairies, werewolves, dragons, while another idea might be an urban fantasy where they are no magical creatures but there is magic. And maybe another idea has no magic at all. So as you plug your characters into each vastly different idea, the two start to mold each other. Your characters drive the plot, and the plot you chose will help you add deeper levels to your existing characters. 
If something doesn’t feel right, move onto the next idea. Imagine your characters are standing on a stage, and you’re simply switching out the scenery and the costumes. You’re giving them opportunities to play different roles, but you’re allowing them to bring their own personalities and backgrounds to each role they take on. 
Eventually you should find something that just fits. And when that happens, you keep going with it. You might run into problems as you’re writing, and you might be tempted to move onto another idea, and that’s okay! Go with your instincts and see what happens. Discipline with an idea is hard to maintain, so don’t feel guilty about it. It’s something all writers struggle with. 
When it comes to frustration during the writing process, the trouble is differentiating between your idea just being dead and the typical writing problems that you’ll see with any idea. But I think that’s a whole other topic that maybe I’ll get into at a later date ;)
Writing = experimentation. Try things out and see what’s working and what isn’t. You’ll know an idea is worth exploring when it happens, because your excitement and enthusiasm will soar. 
And as an afterthought, here’s another post that might be useful to you: Focusing on One Project.
-Rebekah
The Plot Line Hotline is currently looking for admins! If you love writing about writing, go here to fill out our application!
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homesteadchronicles · 2 days ago
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Source @PaperFury
Suggested reading: 3 Secrets To Simplicity In Your Writing Process
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homesteadchronicles · 2 days ago
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Me writing at age 15: what IF the story was about people KIDNAPPING teenagers and CRUELLY EXPERIMENTING on them and I had a NINE YEAR OLD accidentally KILL A MAN with unharnessed DEADLY PSYCHIC ENERGY
Me writing at age 25: what if a vampire was just a really good dad to his loving family and my characters had a whole conversation with a faerie about human music genres
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